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Arizona sentinel and Yuma weekly examiner. (Yuma, Ariz.) 1911-1915, December 26, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060876/1912-12-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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DID AN UNUSUAL THING
The bouse of representatives did
rather an unusual thing in ousting
Representative Bowman, Republican,
who has held the seat as a member
from Pennsylvania for two years, and
then refusing to. admit George R.
McLean, his Democratic opponent.
Both men were held guilty of spending
moaey beyond the limit, thus exceed
to the speed limit prescribed by the
corrupt practice set.
TEMPERATURES YESTERDAY
Maximum, 60. minimum, 3G; hu
midity, 85 per cent
MEMORIAL TO LINCOLN
.A; two million dollar memorial to
Abraham Lincoln has been assured by
the action of the senate, in approving
the-' recommendations of the Lincoln
Memorial Commission. It will be
erkfcted in close proximity to the
great Washington monument in the
national capital.
VOLUME XLIII. NUMBER 6.
The
GIRLS JOIN IN FORMING
: (iOO-A-YEAR
M
LOS ANGELES MAIDS PLEDGE
TO MARRY NO MAN ON
SMALLER SALARY
LOS ANGELES, Dec. 26. Half a
6&en local girls of prominence, led
ter'MUa Chrystal LaChauce, have or
ga&ized the "Five Thousand a Year"
cfoib, which they believe will mean
lm hit-or-miss marriages in this city
f-the future. .The plan is that no
Bjflmber of the club shall marry a
nsn -who has less than $5,000 assured
Feirly Income. Miss LaChauce, al
though very young, has studied the
carriage question for years, and her
conclusions are that a marriage with
love and no pay-check" is a sad
KffW. She has interested many who
entertain the same opinion, and a
itf&abershlp of a score jot pretty-girls
ltttn aight, she declares. The consti
t&oa reads:
ffKo member of the club, . unless it
.c be shown that she has been in
kjfe with a man for net less than four
years shall be allowed to wed a man
3io does not earn each and every
Ratr at least $5,000, of which such
ascertain apportionment shall be made
tig the wife upon the agreement of
husband and said wife. Furthermore,
ftpshall be the duty of every member
cf the elub to warn other girls, non
Beznbers, against the policy of mar
E&ag for love alone."
tr
tf"ft's the only sensible plan," says
ss LaChaunce, " to raise the stand
d of marriage and happiness to the
proper plane Love will never change.
Selfishness, which is stronger, can
a$rer be obliterated, The thing to
4gi t&ea la to mix a little money with
live,
Tfcere are thousands of $5000-a-year
aeu. There are also thousands of
$J,(HM)-a-year men who lack only the
initiative to get into the former
FORTY DYNAMITE CASES
60 TO JURY
KtfBIANAPOLIS, Ind., Dec. 26. It
was understood at the opening of the
"dynamiting conspiracy" trial today
that the cases of 40 union-labor de
fBadants, accused promoting the
MeNamara dynamiting plots, would go
tit the jury late this afternoon.
WORD WINS FiM
H'VEY BY KNOCK-OUT
SYDNEY, Australia, Dec. 26. Sam
Laagford knocked out Sam McVey to
flay In the thirteenth round, in one of
the fiercest heavyweight battles seen
Australia for years.
WILL SING "THE HOLY CITY"
A few weeks ago, at the Methodist
efcareh, Miss Georgia Tomlinson sang
that beautiful song, "The Holy City,"
to such a charming manner as to eng
tirely captivate those who were pres
ent on that occasion. As she has been
requested to repeat same, she will do
so at the Sacred Concert to be held
KWt Sunday evening.
Wor
The Phelps-Dodge company of Bis
bee, owners of the El Paso & South--westesrn
railroad and one of the rich
est corporations in this country, on
Christmast day presented the citizens
of Tucson with $60,000 for the build
ing of a Young Men's Christian Associ
ation home.
John Mets, speaking for the Cham
ber of Commerce, addressing Walter
Douglas, vice president of the E. P.
& S. W., said:
"Kindly accept the thanks of the
Tucson Chamber of Commerce on be
half of the people of Tucson, for your
splendid gift to us and we trust that
the attitude of our good people to
your company -will always be such as
will express our deep appreciation."
Mayor I. E. Huffman said. "We are
mighty glad to get it. It is a magnifi
cent gift. The. cause in which the
money is to be spent is a worthy one
and will be deeply appreciated.
Judge William F; Cooper said: "It
is fine. Tucson appreciates the spir
it of the gift."
Rev. H. B. Roberts, pastor of the
Congregational church, said: "A
Young Men's Christian Association
building is the one great thing that
Tucson needs. One realizes this when
it is remembered that there is no insti
PROGRESSIVES TO REAR
TOR LAFOLLETT
ORATE
SENATOR TO MAKE FIRST PUBLIC
POST-ELECTION APPEAR
ANCE AT MINNEAPOLIS
MADISON, Wis., Dec. 26. United
States Senator LaFollette will make
his first public appearance, since the
election, in the Minneapolis' auditori
um next Monday evening under the
auspices of the Minnesota Progressive
Republican league. He will talk on
"A Deal in Politics."
DELINQUENT TAXES
KAPAI COUNTY
PRESCOTT, Dec. 2G. The delin
quent tax roll of Yavapai county for
the current year, has been compiled,
and reaches the amazing sum of ?4i,
095.63, which is over $10,000 more
than in 1911, and the heaviest known
since the county was founded.
IE
S AI 1 END
CANANEA, Sonora, Mexico, Dec. 26.
The srike, which affected the eng
tire camp, and in which as many as
1000 men were engaged at one time,
was ended today, through the in
fluence of Acting Governor Padilla.
The Examiner Office for Job Work
mm rftc y m n
I UUUUI1 UL l U I i ' lil
FOR A CHRIS
NEW
ARIZONA
AND
YUMA,
Is
IIS GIFT
tution of this sort to which the young
men can go for recreation. The gift
of the El Paso & Southwestern is fully
appreciated."
The Tucson Citizen says:
"That eyeryone in Tucson appreci
ates the $60,000 Christmas present of
the El Paso & Southwestern to Tuc
son, in the 'form of a Y. M. C. A.
building to be erected here, there is
little cause to doubt. It is a splendid
gift, worthy of the donors, and ac
ceptable to the recipients.
"The gift, made In recognition of
the friendly offices of Tucson's citi
zens in raising a large sum of money
for the railroad's right of way through
Tucson, and at a .time when large
sums of money were not, particularly
easy to secure here or elsewhere, now
shows the deep appreciation of the
Phelps-Dodge company for Tucson's
attitude, and that appreciation is most
fittingly expressed.
"Tucson has long needed a Y. M. C.
A. The matter has been long consid
ered and frequently agitated, but .he
required money seemed almost impos
sible to secure. The railroad company
has afforded an easy solution of the
difficulty." v
Phoenix, the capital city, has had a
Y. M. C. A. for several years. Yuma
is next in line we trust
iVERIDGE WILL MAKE
REPLY TO LAFOLLETTE
ST. PAUL, Dec. 26. Former Sena
Beveridge will answer Senator La
Follette in his address before the Pro
gressives of Michigan, Minnesota, Wis
consin, North and South Dakota, at a
meeting to be held in St. Paul an
January 24. The Wisconsin senator
will address a meeting of ' the Pro
gressive Republicans at the Minnesota
auditorium on Monday, Senator La
Follette will be follewed January 22
by Senator Kenyon of Iowa.
HER EXPERTS
ROLD TOURNAMENT
TORONTO, Ontario, Dec. 26. Ex
pert checker players from many points
throughout Canada assembled at the
rooms of the Toronto Checker Club
today for the opening of the annual
Dominion championship tournament.
Three hundred dollars in cash
prizes will be divided among the win
ners of the tournament.
. At Monday's session of the Superior
Court, Judge Baxter ordered the re
lease of Frank Peters, the young bur
glar who last October entered a room
on North Main street lodging house
and was chased away by the landlady,
to be caught in the back yard by
several men who were sleeping there
The culprit has been sentenced to a
term of six months in pail. His re
lease was on account of the extreme
youth, he being less than eighteen.
He promised to leave town if released.
Get New Magazines at Shorey's.
YEAR
YUMA WEEKLY EXAMINER
ARIZONA, THURSDAY, DECEMBER
Growin
IS STATE-RIGHT TAN NAMES ARNOLD AS
IN LEGALIZING RECEIVER OF LAMD OFFICE
MURDER
IT IS BELIEVED MANY IMPROVE-
I
MENTS CAN AND WILL BE
MADE IN FUTURE
GOV. HUNT'S POLICY APPROVED
DEATH PENALTY IS EQUIVALENT
TO THE CRIME OF MURDER,
SAYS MRS. MUNDS.
THROUGH GOVERNOR HUNT, ARI
ZONA LEADS IN UNIVERSAL
MOVEMENT FOR'PRISON
REFORM; AND THE '
WORLD GROWS
BETTER
There was a time when the state of
Connecticut thought it proper to in
flict the death penalty for fourteen dif
ferent crimes, but she has learned
to get along oh less now, and irfrposes
the death penalty only in two instan
ces wanton murder and high treason.
Three of the states Maine, Rhode
Island and Wisconsin have been get
ting along very nicely for a number
of years without any legalized mur
dering. The world ls..growing better.
Less than a hundred, years ago Eng
land had 222 crimes catalogued which
called for the death penalty. In the
majority of these cases hanging was
considered sufficient ' as punishment,
but there were several in the list that
called for something more classy
drawing and quartering, burning at the
stake, boiling in oil, and the like. 1
believe she still inflicts the death
penalty for all but 220 of these of
fenses. Surely the world is growing
better.
Crime has a strong tendency to be
get crime, and capital puniBhment, or
legalized murder, has a larger -influence
for evil in this respect than does
Unlawful murder for it goes unques
tioned, uncriticised and unrebuked.
When an individual takes the life of
a fellow creature, it is usually done in
a moment of frenzy or ungovernable
passion, whereas, when the state
'akes a human life, it is always" with
he coldest calculation and with the
most careful and deliberate attention
to the details,- When an Individual is
placed on trial for murder, the Indict
ment always designates the offense
as being a "crime against the peace
and dignity of the state" which
means the people and in order to
bring about peace and to heal a sorely-wounded
dignity, the state which
still means the people assumes the
role of murderer In turn - and takes
the life of the individual.
It is a bad example to be set by the
state or, the people, if you please
for, unquestionably, it has demoraliz
ing and depraving influence upon
every individual that goes to make up
our social fabric. It is my under
standing that the laws of all the states
exclude the butcher from jury duty
in a murder trial. Why is this? Sim-
(Continued on Page' Four)
26, 1912
PHOENIX, Dec. 26. Private ad
vicesto the effect that President Taft
has appointed Charles E. Arnold to
succeed himself as receiver for the
United States land office in Arizona,!
were received from Washington today
by Ralph Cameron. J
The message simply stated that Mr. .
Arnold's, name had been sent to the !
senate for confirmation. It .has been
generally understood in political . cir- j
eles that the president would sendj
a number of appointments to the sen--ate
today. ' . j
The name of the man appointed to
succeed Frank H. Parker as regis
ter of the land, office is a subject of
ES
mo dsiii
run imiLiii
TUCSON, Dec. 26. On Saturday
Tucson put in a bid for another rail
road. Acting on the theory that you
never know what is possible until it
has been tried, John Metz, president
of the Chamber of Commerce, called a
special meeting, and sent the follow
ing telegram:
"E. P. Ripley, president of the Santa
Fe railroad, Chicago: The Tucson
Chamber of Commerce, at a special
meeting, authorized me to communi.
eate with you and to say that, they
would like a meeting with you with, a
view of arranging a right of way,
through our city, free of cost to yourj
company, for a continuation of the
Santa Fe, Phoenix & Prescott to this
city." -
NARROW ESCAPE
OE
The Douglas International tells of
the remarkable accident which befeh
Sam Feeney, who is in the employ ot
the E. P. & S. W., at their pump
house in Douglas, and a well known
Cochise county resident. By some
means his blouse became entangled
on the pump shaft, which is about
three or four feet from the floor, and
In an instant he was swirling about
at a terrific rate of speed, his feet
striking the floor with great force
and lightninglike rapidity.
Luckily, the man's helper was, pres
ent and had the present of mind to
shut off the motor and rescue Feeney,
who at the time was unconscious and
thought to be dead, as he had whirled
with the pump shaft no less than 100
times.
He was hurried to the Calumet hos
pital and soon restored to conscious
ness, when it was discovered that ho
had suffered a fracture of one rib and
received some severe cuts and bruises,
but none that need be fatal
The velocity with which the man
turned on the shaft may be judged
, from the fact that his feet hitting the
, floor fairly knocked the heels off his
shoes and literally demolished
soles
the
(let New Magazines at Shorey's.
lively speculation, but.it is believed
to have been Bob Kirk. Kirk has
been an aspirant for the office. Par
ker, who is a strong supporter of Col.
Roosevelt, and who came out openij
as a Progressive in the last campaign,
did not apply for reappointment.
The terms of both Parker and Ar
nold expire January 5, and it .is . pre
sumed that the names, of their suc
cessors were sent to the senate to
gether. "I believe that ray appointment will
be confirmed by, the senate If no fight
is made again3t by the Arizona Sen
ators," Receiver Arnold said this af
ternoon. "I do not believe that Smith
or. Ashurst will oppose n.e." v
W RESELLERS. KILL
101 iRSRAL AND
iSSES PURSUE
WHILE OFFICER IS SPEAKING TO
RIOTERS, ONE SHOOTS
FROM BEHIND
SALT LAKE', Dec. 26. William Nel
son, aged 21, while serving his first
night as city marshal of Midyale, was
shot and almost instantly killed early
today by revellers celebrating Christ
mas. The slayers are not yet cap
tured. When four foreigners came out of
a Greek bakery they began, firing re
volvers. Nelson and another officer,
George Cartari, approached them froir
different directions. Nelson reached
the revellers first and ordered them
to cease the disturbance, after he had
fired one shot into the air to frighten
them.
While he was speaking, one crept
up behind him and fireed. The bullet
entered the officer's skull and he fell
dead. The revellers fled.
CHAIRMAN OF INVESTIGATING
COMMITTEE VILL MAKE "
STRONG EFFORT
WASHINGTON, D. C, Dec. 26.
An effort to extend the senate cam
paign fund investigation to cover the
presidential fight of 1912 will be made
by Senator Clapp, chairman of the in
vestigating committee, soon after the
congress reconvenes.
James Garvin and wife were in from
Somerton today to meet Mrs. Garvin's
mother, Mrs. T. Ackerman, and sis
ter, Miss Ackerman, from Los An
geles, who will make a visit of about
a month.
The Examiner office for Job worlc.
W PROBE GIFTS 10
CAMPAIGN OF
1912
NO MORE DEAD LETTER SALES'
It has been the custom, for many
years, for the Post Office Department
to collect all the unclaimed packages
from the Dead Letter Office and hoid
an auction. Different packages were
listed in a printed book, and a" brief
description of the contents was given,
then the auctioneer, without allowing
examination, called for bids, and the
person making the highest offer se-J
cured the mysterious package. Sales
have always been well attended," and
some of the purchases proved to be
bargains, while others were a perfect
hoax. This year .the merchants of
Washington protested vigorously, and
the matter was taken to the attorney
general, who, after a careful investi
gation, called the sale a lottery, and
it was declared off on the morning it
was scheduled to occur. There were
35,000 packages listed.
ARIZONA SENTINEL FOUNDED 1872
etter !
il
BLIND PIGS" II MESA
RAIDED B? SHERIFF
ANfl POSSE
ARRESTS MADE BY SHERIFF J.,D.
ADAMS AND CONSTABLES
JIM MURPHEY
PHOENIX, Dec. 26. Armed with
search warrants, Sheriff J. D. Adams .
and Constable Jim Murphy, Saturday
night went to Mesa, where they suc
ceeded in confiscating a considerable
quantity of liquor and arresting . two
men for selling liquor in a local option
precinct. The two arrests were-John-son
Trainer, a barber of Mesa, and a
man by the name of Londen, who was.
working for W. II. Glaney who Der
ates a pool hall.
The sheriff's office and the county
attorney's office is determined to .put
a stop to the sale of liquor" in- local
option precincts. Information was re-
ceived to the efect that liquor was
being sold in Mesa and the officers
proceeded to investigate. The search
took most of Saturday evening and.
lasted until well into Sunday morn
ing. From the establishment of Train
er the officers succeeded in getting
about two dozen bottles ol.per, and
from the pool hall belongingjjto Gla
ney two barrels of bottled Vere se
cured. In the latter case, .the owner
and proprietor of the place had gone
and had left Londen to take care of
the business. The officers t took hira
into custody. Glaney is. wanted, but
his whereabouts are unknown.
T
lySTILlILD
POSSESS!;!
T
BULGARIA MAY BE-1NDUCED BY
ENVOYS' TO TAJJE OTHER ;
PART OF EMPIRE .
LONDON,-. I)ec. 26. The possession
of the Turkish fortress of Adrianople,
the principle cause of contention since
the beginning of !warin the Balkans,
still remains the reiar'stumbling block
in the way. ofpekcel Compensation
for Bulgaria J?yJ giving her some other
part of European Turkey will probably
in the jid remove even this difficulty
and enable hereto consent to the re
tention by Taric?ajt. the great fortress
which the allied, roops were unable
to subdue.? . g Ji
b-adHnjured
S. W. Huss, son of S. P. Huss, of
the valley, was badly injured yester
day, in the lower valley, while engag
ed at work with a hay baler. The
mechanism of the bailer failed to work,
properly and one of the prongs of the
hay fork svfung loose and caught Huss
in the fleshy prt of the thigh, ripping
a great hole in his leg, and inflicting
a dangerous wound.
Dr. Clymerrwas telephoned for, and
he made a .quick trip to the valley,
where he found the boy and dressed
the wound.. He then brought the boy
to his. father's1 home in his automobile
where he left" him. Dr. Clymer stated
last night that the injury would not
prove lata!,- but would confine the
young man. .to his home for some time.

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