OCR Interpretation


Arizona sentinel and Yuma weekly examiner. (Yuma, Ariz.) 1911-1915, January 09, 1913, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060876/1913-01-09/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

for Yuma
O O O-O ooo'oooo o'.o o 0,0 o
and
o o-o o o ooooooooooo
o
ARMY OF CONSTRUCTION O
- O
While the main construction
work in connection with this
project was being accomplished
most actively, there were 1800
men and 2300 animals engaged
on the various jobs. The entire
project has been in course of
construction for seven . years,
and it is estimated it will take
two years to fully complete the
work outlined. Construction
at the present time is confined
to extensions of the canal and
levee systom. Councilman H.
S. Fay at San Diego.
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
o
o
ooooooooooooooooo
VOLUME XLIII. NUMBER S.
COAST LOSSES FROM
COLO BOri INTO THE
ILLliS
CITRUS CROP DAMAGE IS ESTI
MATED AT FROM $10,000,000
TO $30,000,000,
LOS ANGELES, Jan. 7. Showing
temperatures four to six degrees low
er than those of the night before, the
cold last night destroyed all hope of
avoiding losses to the citrus crops.
In money damage it is estimated at
anywhere from $10,000,000 to $2b,000,
000. Railroad losses,' expressed in
terms of shipments will figure any
where from ten to twenty thousand
carloads.
The actual amount. oL Joss is. de
! silent somewhat on the attitude of
ii-t .government. ' if it maintains the
position assumed last year in the
"sweated fruit" case, when oranges
artificially ripened by a slight heat
i;.g prouess- were confiscated, the
la ses will be heavier than if the
growers are permitted to "sweat"
s '.ghtly in order to take the frost out
oj. jome of the blighted fruit.
In some sections where the growers
H rayed their trees with water the
gioves were bedecked with icicles and
a network of frost. In -Los Angeles
the streets are fey. A man fell down
and damaged his jaw. In Sari. Fran
cisco it is reported that- a man was
frozen to death for the first, -time in
the history of the state.
HARRY li
PHOENIX, Jan. 7 All tho Prot
estant minister.-: Phoenix have
joined in a movement to prohibit the
marriage of persons oi unsound mind,
those afflicted avith contagious 'dis
eases and those in the last stages of
consumption.
A ringing resolution along thisjlin'e
was adopted at the last meeting of
tLe Ministers' Association, which in
cludes all the Protestant pastors of
this city, and Bean William Scarlett
of Trinity pro-cathedral has announc
ed that he will refuse to marry per
sons who cannot produce medical
certificates.
GOFFIN IN TWO PA
ZANESVILLE, Ohio, Jan. 7. The
first coffin to be sent by parcels post
was "mailed" from here to Dexter
City, Ohio. It weighed 14 pounds, in
two packages, and required 6S cents
postage.
ME
!M 1,1
NSW YORK, Jan. 7. A want ad
appeared today, rading in part: "I
Tate to work but need money. I am
lazy. Have you a lazy man's job for
nie that will give me three meals a
dav, lodging and a little loose
cha'ige?"'
RGELS
GENTS
costs ee
lkt m
.M: A U I I A I A Sk I -I K y
That Yuma will secure a $75,000
highway bridge across the Colorado
river is about as certain as anything
can be until its accomplishment. As
stated in The Examiner last Saturday
a bill to provide for such a bridge was
introduced on January 2. Through
the courtesy of Congressman Carl
Hayden, he Examiner has received
a copy of the bill, which is as follows:
A BILL
To provide for the construction of a
bridge across the Colorado river be
tween the Yuma Indian Reservation,
in California, and the town of Yuma,
in Arizona.
Be it enacted by the Senate and
House of Representatives of the Unit
ed States of America in Congress as
sembled, That there is hereby ap
propriated, out of any money in the
Treasury not otherwise appropriated,
not to exceed the sum of $25,000, and
in no event more than one-third of
the sum that may be necessary for
WANT TO' MUZZLE THE PRESS ,
The Farmers' Congress held at
Chicago, passed strong resolutions
against the federal postal . law re
quiring all newspaper publishers
to publish the names of the owners,
the amount of indebtedness, the
names of its creditors, believing the
law was slipped through for the pur
pose of muzzling the press. If the
wise legislators had also insisted that
each newspaper publish the names of
alN those indebted to it, they might
find a lot of well known names- in the
list
ooooooooooooooooo
O
O
O
O
oi
O,
o!
oi
i
Oi
IDEALS
Ideals are like stars; you will
never succeed in touching them
with your hands, but like the
sea-faring ,man on. the desert
of waters, you will follow them
0 . as your guides and thereby you
O reach your destiny.
o
o c
OGOOOCOOOCOOOOOOC
EXPENSIVE LUXURY
The Commerce court, of which
Judge Archbald, who has been on trial
before the senate, is a member, evi
dently did not overlook the personal
comfort of its members, and the us.
of the public funds in putting "Up and
fitting up a royal palace for this court,
is little short of scandalous. Five
Judge's chairs cost $690, and remoJel
ing these same chairs cost $475, mak
ing, the total cost of each $223 The
forty-eight chairs for tho different
rooms cost $2,054, the cheapest in tht
lot being six stenographer's chairr
which cost $12.75 each. Although tht
court was held indented quarters, the
fifty-five windows were decorated witl
curtains costing $3,444.80, and 25 foot
stools costing $6.50 each, were scat
tered about the floors. A davenport
cost $175, while simple things like
I pigeon hole cases were paid for at
) $114.75. About $40,000 was spent in
' fixing up this court which never per
' formed any especially useful purpose,
and which will be abolished on March
4th, next.
AND
YUMA,
, the construction of a bridge across the
Colorado river,- from School Hill, on
'the Yuma Indian .Reservation, in the
i state of California, to Penitentiary
, Hill, in the town of Yuma, in the state
; of Arizona, to be expended, under the
' direction of the Secretary of the In
! terior, invthe construction of a bridge
as recommended by the Secretary of
the Interior in House Document Num
bered One Thousand and Twenty,
Sixty-second congress, third session;
I provided, That no part of the money
herein appropriated shall be expended
until the Secretary of the Interior
: shall have obtained from the prope
authorities of the State of, Arizona and
the State of California -satisfactory
guaranties of the payment, by the said
states, or by the county of Yuma, In
the State of Arizona, and the county
of Imperial, in the State of California,
of at least two-thirds of the cost of
said bridge; and that the proper an-,
thorities of the said states assume
full responsibility for and will at all
times maintain and repair said, brdge
and the approaches thereto.
TARIFF TINKERS UP A STUMP
During the presidential campaign
Governor "Wlison referred several
times to a "competitive tariff," as the
kind that he considered mosty desira
ble. Democratic leaders at the capitol
upon whom will devolve the task of
working out the tariff bills for the ex
tra session, are giving ilvme anxious
thought to ihe question of what con
stitutes a competitive tariff within the
meaning of the president-elect. Appar
ently he intended the phrase to apply
to schedules so arranged as to pro
mote competition within the country
that would keep down prices. Judged
by this standard, the bills passed by
the house last winter, and put forward
as the basis of the Demorcatic tariff
program will hardly pass muster. The
sugar bill is a case in point. When the
bill was passed by the lower house
abolishing the tariff on sugar in obed
ience to the demand of the sugar j
trust and other refiners, the claim was
set up that this would save to the
American consumer between one and
two cents a pound on all the sugar
used. Developments in the sugar mar
ket since that time, not only have dis--nroven
this assertion, but indicate that
in attacking the sugar tariff the' Dem
ocratic leaders were laying the axe to
what was one of the most perfect ex
amples of the "competitive tariff"
lauded by Governor' Wilson. The esti
mate in regard to the saving which the
merican consumer of sugar- could rea
lize under free trade was arrived at by
assuming that the price of. sugar in
the United States represented the full
tariff duty added to the world-market
orice at Hamburg, which is the world's
:;reat sugar market In that case the
orice of raw sugar in the United States
would be over four cents a pound,
while in reality it is well under four
cents. The factor that has brought
down the price, it is admitted by ex
perts, is the great increase of American-Grown
sugar, and the competition
:t affords. The problem before the
Democratic leaders now is how to es
cape the charge of attempting to de
stroy the very sort of tariff that
their leader has praised.
The Examiner Office for Job Work
Certa
YUMA WEEKLY EXAMINER
ARIZONA, THURSDAY, JANUARYS,
YUMA NEE
aS?
HOW TO PLANT AUSTRALIAN RYE
DURING WlNTEffcWONTHS T'O
MAKE FINE- LAWNS -
TAKE- PLACE OF BERMUDA, GRASS
THE LACK OF GREtfj LAWNS' "HAS
PAINED ARTISJIC.SOUL OF
F. FRANCESCHl '
I 1
3
; Death
JUST A FE
1 00
"l3tISECSSARYTO --SE.E0THEfwhich e 1s supposed" to purchase, he
RYB EACHSUMMEtt AS THE
HEATjOF THE SUMMER
KILLS IT OUT
' TUCSON, Jan. 74 The "lack ' of
green lawns in Tucson, pained-tho ar
tistic soul of, Oammilp rFenzt Frances-
chL landscape architect, whoarrived
Monday to 'beautify .4h..BrPaso -&
Soatiorestern groundscln :6anta-rBar-
Tiara, whence "Fxanceschi comes thai
lawns alwaya aragren,' he tayaa
From .Prok 3. J. Tnarnber of tHe
Unirersity of. Arlisona, whom. h
called upon In the course of business,
he learned that winter -lawna are-pos-tubib
oj. ih sowing of Australia; rye
in September, on iop of the Bermuda
grass, of which most Tueeou lawns
consist. The expense, he says, would
be little, a few? pounds of the. rye being
sufficient tff- seed the ordinary' -lawn.
"The. seed should be raked into the
Bermuda," said Pranceachii "The men
of-the house can;-do it In an hour'some
afternoon. It is not too late-, wen5
now. A lawn so treated would be
srreenria two weeks. It would lasUun-
tll April 1.
"It is necessary to -sed f the rye
each. fall, as the heat of the summer
kills -It-eat - This is the combination
of "grasses that will be used in' thJBt
Paso & Southwestern gardens. .
"It seems .to; .me that the city or.
county should take the initiative1 in
this. A- gardener could keep all of
(he city, .-parks, looking green- and
trim. r
'Tucson- gardens ..'iwould profit
from: more: f ertllizev,' phosphates' and
nitrates;- it some plaees the ground
should be ;leesened by mixing saiuT
with it
Franceschi .-is. the son of Dr; E. E.
Franieschl, .an authority -on bamboos'
and succulents ...such aa.-eactus' and
yucca. ' j
SEEM
TH E G
LITTLE ROCK, Ark., Jan: 7, The
Arkansas convict system, brought into
prominence recently by the pardoning
of 360 convicts by Governor Epn
aghey as a protest .against the lease
system, is one of the first-matters to
be considered, hj. the states legislature
which convened today. -yvtx. t
Get NeW Magazines at Shotey'.
REFORM-
J
.1913
Jr-x fxxMKx'X
U Y mo AU h WMUS I I If!
Governor Marshall of Indiana, vice the actual ownership were concerned,
president-elect, last Saturday took there had been no change. As a mat
part in the crusade against gambling ter of fact, the so-called buyers and
hat has been launched by fraternal purchasers never handled, the stacks;
organizations. Governor Marshall ad- they, simply put up margins and paid
yocated national legislation against brokers' commissions,
gambling and promised his aid in-ob-; Under the new era of centralization
faining 3uch laws. , the stock exchange market, naturally
All of which caused a Yuma citizen is, in the hands of the few. If Mr
yesterday to ask: "When is gam- Morgan so desired he could play havo
Wing?"
when a man sits down on the
"wrong side of the table" at faro he
rbets' whether chance, luck or the cun-
ning of the dealer will bring a piece
of pasteboard to the top.
When a man takes a flyer on the
"street," puts up a margin of 10 per.
cent of the face value of the stock
bets upon : the face of the sum, the
mood of the money combine or on the
cupidity of the brokers on the stock
exchange, whether" they shall be the
"bears" or "bulls."
To a looker-on the difference in the
form of gambling is slight and in both
cases it is gambling, no matter what
term may be used.
In, the Pujo probe now going for-
ward at Washington it developed that
the stocks extant of the Reading rail-
.road has been sold and resold on the
f-New York exchange thirty times ii
one year; that U. S. Steel, the great-
est corporation in the country, should
have changed ownership seven times
In that period, according to the "sales"
recorded, and that Union Pacific
stock ' transfers" amounted to seven
times the total. During the period of
excitement a great "industrial" would
change -hands several times - in. a
month, yet, as iar as the public or
mi RUNS WIL
ENGINEER UitlNOUS
POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y., Jan. 7.
Overcome by steam from a broken
pipe, Engineer Williams lay senseless
in his cab while his train ran wild
for two miles. He recovered in time
to stop the train.
Oet 'new Magazines at Shorey's.
NORTHEASTERN PART OF THE
TECTED BY DEVELOPMENT OF
RECEIVE ITS SHARE OF COLD
CASTERS ASSERT MIDDLE W
M S 10 1 GULF STATES
WASHINGTON, D. C, Jan. 7 The week is over,
cold wave throughout the West ex-j Southern California is experiencing
tended southeastward today to the j the coldest weather in 40 years. Rec
Gulf states. The northeastern part of j.ords at other points today aro as fol-
the country was given temporary pro -
tection by the development of an area
of high pressure v over the Atlantic
near the coast, but this territory, ac
cording to the weather sharps, will
gradually feel the cold before the
- i -v -
and compel a stock exchange panic
any ;;our, and this is true of his chie
competitor, the Rockefeller interests
The late Mr. Harriman made hi.
great fortune thrsugh stock manipula
tion, more than in the advance in the
actual value of his roads and he wa
,a builder in the broader sense. Hi
. profits went to him" from gambling o-
thu-exchange.
j The stock exchange, must be neces
sary, else it would not be permittee"
J in all the great commercial center;
of the world; but the New Yorl
i stock exchange, with' which we havi
' most to do, should be something els;
' than- a gambling pit, given respecta
bility by the enormity oi its transac
tions and acting evidently under the
letter of the law.
Is the exchange a necessity to com
merce? Does the Chicago wheat pi
benefit the farmer who grows the
grain? One thing is certain, and tha'
is, if Wall street were not such a mag
net for the .money of interior banks
development at homo would receive
more assistance from the bank . sur-
pluses. But when "call money" goer,
shooting to 20 per cent, as part of th
stock exchange gambling game, per
haps1 the banks are not to blame fo
sending their surplus cash to tho grea
hoppe..
mKii! mm
I L.IL.U nnu ifjwuv
HOSE HUG
CLEVELAND, O., Jan. 7. Flies anc'
mosquitoes, germ-carriers, cause $257 -900,000
annual loss in human life an;"
another million-dollar loss in
former Federal Entomologist
cattle
L. O
Howard told a scientists' convention.
The Examiner office for job work:-
COUNTRY, TEMPORARILY
HIGH PRESSURE AREA,
BEFORE END OF WEEK,
EST FEELS BITING FROST.
PRO
WILL FORE-
1 lows: Pueblo, 22 below; Denver, 13
below; Salt Lake, 2 below; Cheyenne,
24 below; Minedosa, 36 below; El
Paso, 6 above; Amarillo, 2 below;
Omaha, zero; St. Louis, 22 above;
Chicago, 28; Nashville, 56; New Or-
TOhH.
U 1 ULUJ
1 leans, 6S.
o
v'o
O
. o
o
o
. o
;o
o
o
o
b
o
o
'o
o
o
o
o
O
O
C)
O
O
O
-O
O
O
b
O
O
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
MECCA FOR INVESTMENT
The carrying forward of this
reclamation work, by the gov
ernment, has already increased
the values of the lands about
Yuma. Today lands are .sell
ing readily at from $60 "to $200
per acre, that seven years ago
only brought from $15 to $50;
yet the opportunities for ad
vancement for the 'buyer are
today as great and far more
secure than were those for the
pioneer cf former periods.
Councilman Herbert Fay at
San Diego.
o o o oo o o ob oooooooo
ARIZONA SENTINEL FOUNDED 1872
1?
ST MIGHT B!
THE TEAR
- lees -
FANCY O-F A DREAMER IS DE
PICTED BY AN ARTICLEY'
THE L. A. TIMES
GREATER' IMPERIAL (CALEXI
COJ, Dec. 31, 1938. Tho General As
sembly of Calexico today voted $1,
000,000 for the cotton exposition to'
be held here next November. The
neasuie to vote a like n sum for the
big show of all the lower Colorado
country wiH come up before the "Iegis-
ature of the State of Andrade tomor
row and is certain" to be passed. The
city of Lobos, at Port Point .Lribos,
has subscribed $500,000, which. Is the
'argest sum pledged by any individual
cown asideTrom Greater Imperial, ex
cepting BrawleyV Yuma and El Cen
.ro, which have each given a like
sum. Greater Imperial merchants have
subscribed 1,000,000 and the town
aas bonded itself for 52,000,000,
which is. going some for a city with
a population of only 500,000 persons.
It is estimated that the boating priv
leges on the larger canals during the
3ix months of the exposition wijl. net
a profit to the exposition management
of $200,000. '
Ostriches and date exhibits wilLyOf
course, be great features of the' cot
on exposition. Yuma date growers
lave asked to have Thanksgiving day
set aside as Yuma Date Day and have
promised 100,000 pounds of dates in
me-fourth-poiind packages for free
listribution on that occasion. It Is es
timated that not less than 15,000,000
ersons will attend-the exposition jdur
ng the six months and that at least
"ijPpO.000 persons will tako advantage
it the low-rates, to spend the entire
.inter, here. This is giving a ijteat
upetus to the building trade and per-
uits' for more than 12,000 bungalows
fiave been issued at tho city, hall here
n the last sixty days.
HI SHOWS ARE
TUCSON, Jan. 7. Heavy snows in
the mountains around Tucson Mondaj
prevented tho experiment of the for
est service to determine tho efficiency
of a new high power telescope over
the field glasses ordinarily used in
searching for fires.
Forest Supervisor Robert . J. Sel
kirk, who was at Old Baldy in the
Santa Ritas and his rangers who were
?n other mountains for.the purpose
of building smudges telephoned ' that
it was- intensely cold and that the
flying snow made the experiment im
possible. OUTHFOL SLAYER
0011 HEARING
MORRIS, Minn., Jan. 7. One of
the youngest prisoners ever held on
a charge of first degree murder in
Minnesota was given.a. preliminary
hearing in jCourt here -today: He is
Olaf Christopherson, thjej56ear-old
boy who is alleged to havo confessed
to the murder of John Kling on De
cember 18.

xml | txt