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Arizona sentinel and Yuma weekly examiner. (Yuma, Ariz.) 1911-1915, January 16, 1913, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060876/1913-01-16/ed-1/seq-1/

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O RECLAMATION WORK EF O
O FICIENT O
0-O
O As is' usual in all United O
O States, government undertak- O
O ings,"the construction work in O
O connection with the Yuma Pro- O ,
O ject is of uniform excellency, O
O and bespeaks the efficiency of O
O Project Engineer Francis L. O
O Sellew and his force of offi- O
O cials, in recognition of which O
O the people of Yuma presented O
O Bin SeUew with a 122-piece O
O silver set encased in a hand- O
O some rosewood cabinet. Coun- O
O oilman Herbert Pay at San Di- O
O ego. 0
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOO O O
Yuma Valley, Where1 Jack Frost Biteth Not
o JLL y JL JL i-i H JU
AND YUMA WEEKLY EXAMINER
6 6 6 6:6 6 doo6 66o;X o .
o - o
o v o
O NO SUNSTROKES HERE O
O o
0 . O
O The valley lands i vary from O
O 100 to 200 feet above sea level, O
O while the mesa is about 75 feet O
O higher. The average tempera- O
O ture for Yuma city, for the year, O
O is about 73 degrees.. The great- O
O est heat period is two months O
O in the summer when 100 de- O
O' grees is reached. In the winter O
O the temperature rarely falls be- O
O low 45 degrees. Sunstrokes O
O- and frostbites are never experi- O
O enced in Yuma. City Council- O
O man Fay at San Diego. O
ooooooooooooooooo
VOLUME XLm. NUMBER
YUMA, ARIZONA, THURSDAY. JANUARY 16. 1913 f
ARIZONA SENTINEL FOUNDED 1872
9. . ; . -
1912 Mineral Output Largest in History of This Country
suggest change in C0PPERF1ELD AND ML I0P
. tUUuAllunAL LRWa
OF STATE
WANT LEGISLATURE TO ALLOW
CHILDREN TO WORK UNDER
CERTAIN CONDITIONS-
TUCSON, Jan. 14. A recommenda
tion that children under 16 years of
age be relieved of school duties to
work for a livelihood under specific
conditions, will be placed before the
legislature for incorporation in the
compulsory education act The rec
ommedation has been drafted in Tuc
son by the legislative committee of
the state board of education which
met here last week.
The recommendation is to the ef
fect that a child may be permitted
to work, under sixteen years of age,
if sufficient reason for so doing is
shown before a board who will take
the case into consideration. This
board, according to, the recommenda
"tion, will consist of the president of
the school board, the superintendent
of schools and a probation officer ap
pointed by the superior court.
As the present law now stands, a
superintendent Is forbidden to dismiss
a pupil from school except for these
reasons:
1. That such a child is taught at
home by a competent teacher in the
branches taught in the common schools
of the state.
2. That he is attending a regularly
organized private or parochial school,
taught by competent teachers, the reg
ular school hours, for five days in the
week, for the full time that the pub
lie school is in session in the district
3. That such a child is in physical
or mental condition (as declared by a
competent physician approved by the
board) as to render such attendance
Inexpedient and impracticable.
4. That such child has already
completed the grammar school course
as nrescribed by 1 a state board ot
education.
That this amendment is almost a
necessity is readily seen as it often
happens that a- child must contribute
to the support of a family which the
present "law does not allow.
Several other important matters
were discussed at the meeting among
which were some changes in the pres
ent code governing the work of the
committee and incorporated in its re
port to the legislature.
1GKENS CHARACTER
S A3 s
Do you tecali, "Mr. Topsawyer," of
David Copperfield"? Perhaps not
Young Copperfield, himself, could not
recall that he had ever met him. When
William," the waiter, asked the boy
who was on his way to Salem House
school if he knew him, David was com
pelled to reply that he did not.
"There was a gentleman nere yes
pudding. Ain't that lucky? Come on
little 'un, and let's see who'll get the
most."
And David Copperfield's testimony
that "the waiter got most," with his
big tablespoon to Copperfield's little
spoon, may be accepted as more than
true. He got it all. And, after the
meal, which William, the waiter, had
taken from the boy, he extracted then
... ir i x Vi?tvi fny VllC qPT
terdav" said the waiter at. tne xw.wnat was uuuuub iu
mouth Inn "a stout gentleman, by vice.
the name of Topsawyer perhaps you "If I hadn't a lamny, ne uu u
know him?" I tnax poini anQ tuaL "
"No'-' replied David, "I do not think cpwpock, I wouldn't tae a sixyvu.
' I If I didn't support an aged parent and
t any,oa nnd eaitew. . broad- a lely sister" here the waiter was
brimmed bat, -gray coat, speckled greatly agitated-"! wouldnt take
ALASKA'S-MINERAL OUTPUT FOR
1912 IS ESTIMATED. AT $21,
850,000 IN VALUE
choker," said the waiter.
"No," David replied
haven't the pleasure-
He came in here," said the waiter,
eyeing the ale which David had or
dered for his dinner, "ordered a glass.
of this ale would order it I told him
.tronir n And fell dead. It was
too old for him. It oughn't to be
drawn. That's a fact"
Of course. Da'vid Copperfield did not
drink he ale after that, anitthe wait
er, offering himself as a -sacrifice, had
the pleasure of drinking .what David
had paid for.
In like manner, it will- be recalled,
the waiter ate the chops which made
up the principal part of Davld'a din
ner. .
"What have we got here?" he asked,
putting a fork into David's plate. "Not
chops?"
"Lor4, bless my soul," he exclaimed,
"I didn't know they wore chops. Why,
rWs the very thing to take off the
, , - t thai- bpr. Ain't it
Daa euwia ui m.. -----lucky?"
"
When the chops had been disposed
of the waiter brought in the pudding.
.T,,;T,rt hft exclaimed. "Why,
bless me, po it is. What!" looking at
t nearer. "You don't mean to say
it's a batter pudding? Yes, it Js, in-
WW a hatter midumg, ue
taking up a tablespoon, "is my favorite ie
SE
farthing. If I had a good place, and
bashfully, "I was treated well here, I should beg ac
ceptance of a trifle, instead of taking
it. But I live on broken wittles and
I sleep on the coals" hefe the waiter
burst into tears.
And when David rewarded him with
one. ot his three bright shillings, gift
nf thfi faithful PesrKoty. he "received
it with much- humiliation and venera
tion and spun it with his thumb, di
rectly afterwards, to try the goodness
of it"
If one could suppose such a thing
perfectly preposterous, of course as
the evolution of William, the waiter,
into modern big business; and if one
could follow the supposition still pec
fectly preposterous, of 'course and
nicture the fictitious Mr. Topsawyer
as a bugaboo .which still furnishes the
organized and capitalized William, the
waiter, an excuse for grabbing things;
if all that could be Imagined, then the
exnerience of David Copperfield at the
Yarmouth Inn would shed an illumi
nating light upon the demand of the
people of today that prosperity be pass-
Ad around
For, with that picture in mind, it
would be perfectly plain and not per
fectly preposterous to see in young
Copperfield and his unequal contest
a representative oi tna comnum ycu
THE UNITED STATES CONTINUES
TO LEAD THE WORLD IN THE
PRODUCTION OF PETRO-
. LEUJV( 'FOR '"1 9.12 -4 '
IS
CHOICE OF MICHIGAN
LANSING, Mich., Jan. 14. By vote
of the two houses of the Michigan
legislature today William Alden Smith
was chosen to succeed himself in the
United States senate.
Alfred Lucking of Detroit received
the complimentary vote of the Demo
cratic members.
PANAMA CANAL 1BLLS
MAY BE ARGUED
AGAIN
AMENDMENT TO PRESENT ACT
MAY OPEN WHOLE QUES
TION AGAIN
i
mm s
ONE CENT POSTAGE
One-cent postage; an extension of
.the-parcel post and rural free delivery
Rprvice: establishment of federal aid
for post roads, and a readjustment of
railway mail pay, are some of the
postoffice reforms on the program of
the new Democratic administration
YS CENTRAL
BftI 13 NECESSARY
iirAcuTMP.TnM T) C. Jan. 14.
Pestus J. Wade told the House bank
ins? and currency committee today that
the country never could have a sound
monetary system without a central
bank.
NEARLY ALL MINERALS SHOW
RECORD-BREAKING PRO
DUCTION" FOR 1912
ARIZONA LEADS COPPER OUTPUT
WASHINGTON. D. C, Jan. 14. Sen
ator Root introduced a bill to amend
thft Panama Canal act so as t elimi
nate the provision exempting Ameri
can coastwise ships from payment oi
tolls.
QAHO LEGI5LAI
AGAIN ELE
ORE
DOMINION PARLIAMENT
IN SESSION AI OTTAWA
BOISE, Jan. 14, On the first bal
lot, Senator Borah was re-eelcted
United States senator today by the
legislature.
MRS. BROKA GETS
THIRD OF
Get "hew Magazines at Shorey's. j
OTTAWA, Ont, Jan. 14. Confront
ed with a heavy legislative calendar
that is calculated to keep its members
mnrr U'OolfQ tn C.OITIG. thC
Dominion Parliament re-assembled to- J Gould Brokaw, wealthy, clubman, for
day after the holiday recesB. divorce.
NEW YORK, Jan. 14. In the Brook
lyn supreme court, Justice Aspinall
granted to Mrs. Mary Blair Brokaw
S5 000 of the $15,000 she had asked
to cover the cost of suing William
Large figures, some of them clean
record-breakers; have been attained in
the mineral output of the United
States for 1912, according to the spe
cialists of the United States Geological
Survey. The figures of coal produc
tion are most sensational, all previous
records having been surpassed by
about 50,000,000 tons, an increase
equal to lhe total production of. the
country 4Q years ago. The productioii
for 1911 was 496,221,168 short tons;
the estimate for 1912 is 550,000,1)00
tons, and the final figures may even
reach a still higher mark.
The production. -of copper was also
the largest in the history of the indus
try, the high-water-vmark reached in
1911 being handsomely surpassed. Ac
cording to the statistics and estimates?
received by the Survey the output of
blister and Lake copper was 1,249,000,-
000 poundB in 1912, compared with 1,-
097,232,749 pounds in 1911, the respect
ive values, heing nearly $200,000,000
and $137,154,092. The. production of
refined cooper is estimated at 1,560,
000,000 pounds in 1912, compared with
.1,433,875,026 pounds in 1911. The pro
ductlon in Arizona- may have exceed
ed 350.000.000 pounds, not only a rec
ord output for, Arizona but a record for
anv state for any one year.
The gold-mining industry of the
United States , was- generally normal
in 1912 but the Survey estimates in
dilate the smallest production 8ince
1907. when the output was valued at
$90,435,700. That for 1912 is estimat
ed at $91,685,168. In 1909 the goio
production reached very nearly tne
$100,000,000 mark.
Alaska's mineral output m 191 is
estimated at $21,850,000 in value, an
increase of $1,200,000 over the figure
for 1911. Of the total for 1912 the
gold production was valued at $16,
650,000. The total value of Alaska's
mineral production since' 1880, when
mining began in the Territory, is stat
ed, in round numbers, at $229,000,000,
of ' which $202,000,000, is represented
by the value of the gold output
In silver production in the United
stntos in 1912 the indications are for
a possible output of 64,000,000 fine;
ounces, tie highest figure since is.j
when the production waB estimated atj
63,500,000 ounces. The high prices
generally paid for silver, copper and
lead in 1912 stimulated proaucuuu
(Special to the Yuma Daily Examiner)
PALO ALTO, Cal., Jan. 14 The
humane calendar of the American
Humane Education Society says on
the first leaf of 1913: "The last Sun
day in January is Child Labor Day.
It is necessary to educate men and
women regarding the child labor
what it really is, and how dearly it
is costing the human race."
. It is our national disgrace that hun
dreds of thousands of boys and girls,
under sixteen, in this country, are
working while other children play or
qro to-school. k .
Boys of nine and ten years are err
.loyed in the coal mines and breakers
Hundreds of little boys work- all
night long in glass factories..
Little messenger boys are ruined by
night calls at houses of vice.
Charles P. Neill, United States com
nissioner of labor, says: "These
children are working, for US.: They
ore working for ME. ..They "are work
ing for- you:" . "
Even though one's own state has
an effective child labor law, the peo
ple in the state use child labor, for
they buy cloth children in other states
have helped to make, or shoestrings,
straw hats, trimmings, etc. ''Florence
Kelley says no one can stand up and
say his or her clothing is innocent of
child labor.
Would we let our own boy or girl
ten or twelve years old to work
ten or twelve hours a day or night?
By what right do we permit or com
pel other people's children to help
i mak our food and clothes?
Only the Human Father,
A man with power to think,
Will take from little children
The price of food and drink. .
Only the Human Mother f
Degraded, helpless thing!
Will make her little children 'work
and live on what they bring!
No fledgling feeds the father bird!
No chicken feeds the hen!
No kitten mouses for the "cat
This glory is for men.
"5. a re the -strongest, wisest- race-7-,
' Loud may' Bur' praise 'be" sung! t
The tfnly animal alive
That lives uron its youns:!
Charlotte Perkins Gilman.
ATTLEMEii Of COMIHT
FEEL IEED OF AID
III PiOLEI
FIX RESPONSIBILITY FOR" PRES
ENT UNSATISFACTORY
RANGE CONDITION
PHOENIX, Jan. 14. The need of
the strongest federal laws for safe
guarding the' rights of the stockmen
and extending their privileges, was
urged today by H. A. Jastro, presi
dent of the American National Live
Stock Association at the opening ses
sion of the annual convention of the
association.
Jastro attributed' the fact that the
United States' has less live stock per
"apita than ever before to the unsatis
factory range conditions, "arising out
of indiscriminate grazing, and the
scramble to 'secure w;hat is left of the
already depleted ranges."
Federal regulations, he asserted,
offers the only solution of the diffi-
cultyt-- - -
THEODORE TETZLAFF
Theodore Tetzlaff is motor champib n of the world. He won the title
in competition with Barney Oldfield, the daredevil track driver,
' at Los Angeles, taking two straight heats best time, 38 2-5
for the first mile, and 41 flat for the second mile'
I lull!?! 'J r.uuLUUsiu
DIG!
1000 PULP AND PAI
REARING IS
The visiting -assessors were enter
tained last evening with a banquet at
the Stag Cafe. The banquet was giv
eng by the members of the Commercial
Club to the distinguished visitors. All
of the assessors, the deputy assessors,
members of the tax commission and
other visitors were present, together
with fifteen of the. members of the
Yuma County Commercial, Club.
The banquet provided by the Stag
Cafe was up to its usual excellence.
Clement H. Colman presided as toast
master, and after the eating was end
ed and the cigars had been passed
around, various members of the asso
ciation and theaax commission were
called upon for speeches. The re
sponses by- the visitors and home peo
ple were interesting.
Evcrvone had a good time and the
visitors were prfuse in their compli
ments to Yuma and its hospitality.
WILL RE-ELECT
SENATOR WARREN
CHEYENNE, Wyo., Jan. 14. The
twelfth Wyoming legislature,- which
will be called upon to elect a United
States senator and to act upon numer
ous Ifgislative proposals of import
ance, was opened here today. The Re
publicans have a majority on joint bal
lot, which is .believed to assure the
re-election of Senator FrancisE. Warren.
TEMPERATURES YESTERDAY
Maximum, 64,; minimum, 35; hu
midity, 4S per cent. -
PROHIBITION IS
IDE ISSUE
TEXAS
NOW
N
'DRYS' AND 'WETS' PROMISE VIG
OROUS FIGHT IN STATE;
WIDE PROHIBITION
EUROPEAN NATIONS CLAIM THE
RIGHT TO SEND THESE IN
FREE OF DUTY
WASHINGTON,. D. C, Jan. 14 The
Customs Court today listened to argu
ments regarding the wood pulp and
paper cases; in which several Europe
an nations . claim the right to send
i these commodities into the United
States free of duty under Hhe "most
favored nation" clause of their treaties
because free entry, is granted Canada
by the only operative section of the
Canadian reciprocity agreement
(Continued , on Page -Fourt
T. F. Reilly, the mining man, is now
located at Picacho, where The Examiner-
goes to him daily.
The Examiner office for job' wort
Yesterday Yuma weather was warm;
today it is cold. Yuma's reputation
for an even climate is in danger.
vThe Examiner Office for Job Wort
AUSTIN, Tex., Jan. 14. Prohibition
ists, and' those oposed to prohibition
promise a vigorous fight for and also
against a state-wide prohibition meas
ure at the thirty-third session, of the
Texas legislature, which convened at
the capitol today. An effort also is
to be made to modify the restrictions
placed on railroads in this state.
While Texas admittedly needs rail
roads as badly as any state of the
Union, it is claimed that no other
state' exacts so much from the trans
portation companies.
An amendment to the present stock
and bond law also is to come up. The
first important business on the pro
gram will be the formal election of
Congressman Morris Sheppard, the
winner in the primary, to the United
States senate to succeed Col. R. M.
t Johnston, who is filling the unexpired
term of Senator Bailey by appoint
ment of the governor.
t

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