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Arizona sentinel and Yuma weekly examiner. (Yuma, Ariz.) 1911-1915, January 16, 1913, Image 2

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060876/1913-01-16/ed-1/seq-2/

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GHOLARSHIFS 1
E IS DERAILE
SUPERVISO
0Y0 GEIS HO CHANGE IN NATIONAL
FRENCH BOOT MOORS ,
SLAY 500 IN HARD
THREE NEWSPAPERS THAT LEAD
THE ARIZONA WEEKLY SENTINEL
lire
I
his no
E 5
Established 1872
Published Every Thursday for Over Forty Years Without Missing An Issue
E
ED
PLANS
MULE
Entered in the Post Office in Yuma, Arizona as becond Jiass Man Matter
Price. S2.00 Per Year Two Subscriptions, $3.00
Fffi 8
i scion
WED
THE WEEKLY INTER OCEAN
Published Fridays
Established January 20, 1911
Subscription $2.00 Per Yea
DiATioar rawnanpr nf Mnrtheasr.firn Imperial County. California
Entered in the Fostof fice at Bard, ImperiaL County, California, as Second Class
Man Matter
"From the Country God Remembered and Man Doesn't Know"
THE YUMA DAILY EXAMINER
"A THINKING PAPER FOR THINKING PEOPLE"
By W. Harold Shorey ,
Published Daily, Except Sunday
Entered in the Postoffice in Yuma, Arizona, as Second ClasB Mall Matter
Established March 17, 1906
Price, $6.C Per Year
75c Per Month
THE WRONG GALLERIES
TO BE GOOD
I aa improvement and not a detriment
: ' in state nolitics. One effect will un-
The story of Senator Ashurst'-s futile doubtedIy be to tear down many party
effort to get into the limelight. oy tah.- f f th women wlu vote dis.
ing advantage of the audience which ! crimnating!y and not because of the
had assembled in the senate galleries mere sQund Qf a party name
to hear Senator Bailey's swan song, ; ,
is told in a few brief lines in the Press TEN REASONS WHY A BOY OUGHT
of the country.
At the conclusion of. Bailey's speech
Ashurst immediately Secured recogni
tion, warmly defending Hearst and
speaking in favor of the operation of
the initiative and referendum in Ari
zona. The people began to file out of the
galleriek and most of the representa
tives and senators who had listened
for four hours also, retired The pre-.
siding officer asked Senator Ashurst ! record
1. A boy ought to be good for his
parents' sake.
2. A boy ought to be good for his
own sake.
3. A boy should be good for his
honor's sake.
4. A boy should he good for. others'
sake.
5. A boy ought be good for a good
to' suspend while he tried to restore
order, but the Arizona senator said
he did not want order. .
"The chair will restore order
whether the senator from Arizona de
sires it or not," snapped Mr. Galling
er, who was presiding.
This action of Ashurst is haranguing
a dispersing audience in the United
States senate is typical of the man.
His flowery line of talk will not hold
, a crowd at the .capital. Ashurst can
talk to the galleries all right but not
to the galleries of the United States
senate. 1
How much better if. Arizona could
have a representative of deeds in
stead of words in that body! Tucson
Citizen.
SAN
DIEGO'S POPULATION 80,000
SAYS STATISTICIAN
6. A boy ought to be good for a
good reputation.
7. A boy should be good if he ex
pects to get along.
8. A boy should be good if he wants
to be happy.
9. A boy should be good if he wants
to have friends.
10. A boy should be good if he ex
pects to have a partner.
In a recent issue of The Examiner
the population of Son Diego was, in
cidentally, mentioned as being about
80,000. The new estimate, is based
upon the calculations of Hugo Grosser,
statistician, as published in the San
Diego Survey and Exposition News.
Mr. Grosser finds that the building
operations, allowing a per capita of
'$115 the highest in the United States
indicate a population of 80,482; the
Dumber of water-taps, allowing 7.7S
individuals to each meter, whereas
the standard is 6.5, a population of
80,899; the ratio of persons to each
gas- meter, placing the estimate twen
ty per cent below the lowest used in
any other part of the country, a popu
lation of . 80,310; the ratio of individu
als to each electric light meter, plac
ing the estimate twenty-five per cent,
below the lowest used elsewhere, a
population of 80,500; the number of
telephones, granting a . reduction of
twenty per cent, below the standard,
a. population of 80,568. .
. From these estimates, Mr Grosser
deduces the conclusion that the popu
lation of San Diego is not less than
-80,000.
WOMEN SHOW DISCRIMINATION
Despite the fact that Arizona has
allowed the better and fairer sex to
cast a vote has caused some publica
tions of the Southwest, particularly
the El Paso Times, to throw, fit after
fit over the hoop-skirted politics of
this state, the first election held under
the new system, that at Prescott, fails
to show basis for the fears that have
been expressed. In fact, the women
showed themselves to be discrim
inating in their balloting. The only
woman candidate in the field was.
beaten' by'a2 overwhelming majority.
One Republican, the only one running,
was elected, whiie the rest of the city
ticket is made up of Democrats. This
shows conclusively that the women
are not voting blindly. They are not
following the precepts of husbands or
fathers, but are thinking for them
selves. Of the .total of 920 votes cast, 265
were by women.
, The, equal suffrage amendment has
placed a new element in Arizona poli
tics which will have to be reckoned
with in the future. Just how it will
vote none can say. The Examiner is
willing to declare positively, however,
that the women, if they continue to
show suh good sense and discrimina
tion in their future balloting as in
this, the first chance offered, will work
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
O O
O THE WAYS OF A WOMAN O
O - O
.OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
O O
You may boast of lovely womankind
and sing aloud her praise,
And remark her cheery manner and
her optimistic ways,
But a woman is a woman hard to
fathom as the sky!
She can do a dozen women's work and
neyer hat an eye.
But she can't be optimistic in a faded
summer hat
When the frost is on the window and
the rent is on the flat!'
She will soothe your wounded feelings
and assuage your sudden fright
When a flock of ghostly hutcher bills
jumps out at you at night.
She may be as hold and fearless ar
a lion full of roar
When your purse is like a fritter and
and the wolf is at the door;
Still, she can't endure the torture of
that faded summer hat
When the frost is on1 the window and
the rent is on the flat!
Yea, the ways of subtle woman arc
unsearchable and strange,
And her sunny disposition is suscepti
ble to change;
She can be as sad and silent, as a
doughnut on a plate;
Sigh and seek her quiet chamber in a
melancholy state,
Then iush on you like a sunburst in a
forty-dollar hat
Hang the frost that's on the window!
Hang the rent that's on the flat!
9 COUNTIES REPRESENTED IN U
OF A. UNDER PROVISIONS
OF LEGISLATURE
TUCSON, Jan. 13. Not all high
school students in the state are yel
informed that there is a scholarship
of the value of $150, for work at the
University of Arizona, assigned to each
county in the state. A law passed by
the last legislature provided for .these
scholarships and nine of them have
been assigned for the current year,
There were no applications from the
other counties.
Appointment is determined by sue
cess in competitive examination, held
toward the end of the school year, un
der the direction of the county super
intendent. The papers are sent to the
university to be read and the student
passing the best examination is given
the appointment.
The scholarship is good f r . 50 on
the expenses .of the freshing year at
the university and it is not continued
to the second year.
The state does not pay the money
of the scholarship direct to "the stu
dent when he attends the universitj
but sends it to the university office
to defray the fegular fees of the stu
dent. It is a condition of occupying
the scholarship that the president of
the university certify to the state
auditor before an installment of the
scholarship is paid, that the student'?
work in college is satisfactory.
Already Inquiry Is being made of
the president of the university about
the scholarships for next year. Higr
school students Interested in them
3hould address President Wilde of thr
university, at Tucson, for information,
and when the time for the annual ex
amlnation ' approaches, applicatior
should be made to the superintendent
for admission to the examination.
Even if there be no high school in
a given county a young man or woman
residing there may be a candidate for
the county's scholarship if he com
Dletes his college preparation else
where in the preparatory departmen
of the university, at either of the nor
mal schools, or at a high school in an
other county.
The largest single item of expense
at the university, as elsewhere, is the
board. This costs $20 a month and
there are approximately eight and one-
third months in the year a total of
about $167.00. It is apparent, there
fore, that the scholarship discharge?
nearly the whole of this item.
This year the scholarships are held
by the following students:
Pima county, Fred W. Rogers of
Tucson.
Maricopa county, John W. Getsinger
of Phoenix. .
Yuma county, Ruby Livingston of
Yuma.
Cochise county, Margaret Poiser of
Douglas. s
Gila county, Turner C. Smith of
Globe.
Graham county, ' Alma sessions of
Thatcher.
Yavapai county, Ralph Bell of Pres
cott.
Apache county, L. S. Udall of Sa.
Johns.
Greenlee county, Allen C. Jones of
Cliftori.
THE BEST MEDIUMS
At a little gathering of magazine
men at the New York Athletic Club,
recently, J. E. Jones, who founded the
United States Press Association, de
clared that the home printed pages of
local newspapers would become the
advertising mediums to supplant the
big periodicals, and cited the methods
adopted by a half dozen great adver
tisers who have . already ' "seen the
light."
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Ever notice how often a dis
carded newspaper is turned to
the "Classified Advertising"
page?
Want ads are among the moat
O. thoroughly used columns of the
O daily press.
You can scarcely fail of re
sults when you use a classified
ad in The Examiner.
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Yuma' has the climate; Yuma has the
soil; Yuma is all right.
The Examiner office for job work.
BUY A FORD
Buy a Ford because it is a hetter
car; not Decause it is cueo.pej.
Thus spoke Henry Ford, t':o -an be
hind this great little machin., and the
owners of Ford cars everywhere have
been found ready to back up this
statement.
Every fourth automobile now in use
the world over is a Ford.
The arrival today of a carlood of
the Fords, from the Detroit factory,
is good news to Yumaites, and it
means an opportunity to get one of
them at a right price. It is understood
that these cars, with freight included,
will sell for $675 the lowest price
at which a first-class car ever sold.
W. M. Winn is the Yuma agent, and
the Fords are now being unloaded at
the depot.
A MEMBER OF "THIRD DEGREE"
COMPANY WRENCHED HIS
BACK IN LEAPING
PHOENIX, Jan. 10. While' round
ing one of the sharp curves between
Jerome and 'Jerome Junction, the eng
gine of a U. V. and P. train leaped from
the track AVednesday , afternoon "and
rolled down a 40-foot embankment.
The engineer and fireman went
with the engine but the engineer was
not hurt, the fireman receiving no
injury beyond the scalding of one
foot
On the train was the "Third De
gree" company. A. L. Berner, one 'of
the troupe, became excited and leaped
out of the coach. He wrenched his
back and was. not able, to play his
part in Prescott last night. The role,
that of "Howard Jeffries, Jr., was tak
eng by Manager Edwin Pierce, who will
also appear inr that part at the Elks'
theatre this evening. !
SUPERVISORS ALLOW HOLTVILLE GROWERS TO MAKE EXHIBITS IN THE FRENCH CASUALTY LIST IN-
DISTRICT TO BE REIMBURS- - - SPITE OF ADVERSE WEATH- L CLUDES 12 KILLED AND
ED FOR ROAD WORK . ER OF PAST WEEK qiytv wmiMnrn
T7!T. PWHTfl Ton 1A U !. CAM T3T71TM A TTTm, T m tl
' MOGADOR, Morrocco, Jan. 10. The
ing yesterday the Board of Supervisors listening to reports from almost every n.,.,, . , . ,
iench column today fought a severe
voted, on roll call, -to unanimously pass fruit-growing district in this part of ei. Ui '' ... , ,
- . a severe battle with a large farce of
me account oi tne money expended on tue siaie, tne executive committee oi -nT . i .. . A ,
Moors whom they routed with 500
the Holtville-Yuma road, amounting to the third National Orange Show unan- til1nj . , .
Killed. Twelve French soldiers were
?d,500, to the general fund and to take imously agreed that there will be not killed and 60 wounde(J
vifaC uUlu tu xxuitviue ruau - subuib UBVldUUI1'"um The Moors attacked the -French 20
district planS for the show as originally out-; mies &gt Qf Mogador wnere
This money was expended under the "ned. Ttie show will he held, larger were gg the Hnes of communica.
direction of Supervisor Boyd in an ef- and more- beautiful than ever, in this tion in soutnern Morocco.
fort to show the world that a real city, February 17 to 22.
route existed across the sand- hills to There is an abundance of the finest
Yuma. He maintains that the iact
fruit in every district yet available
fnr TnoViTicr nvfnhito in cnifo ef no orl-
was proven since the Yuma convention it.
i vprae w.eauier cuiiuiuuus oi me past
last Saturday adopted the route for few days. -Not a single cancellation
the National Highway. Mr. Boyd had of space has been made and on, the
but the action of the Yuma convention contrary many sections have already
had its effect and he was allowed the sent in -word that they will be on hand
reimbursement, on the ground that at with- even a better display than they
-was made for the benefit of the whole had loriginally planned to make.
country rather than for his - district Following the report that the. fruit
alone.
men are standing (solidly behind thc
s"how, the coniniittees have taken lip
their work with - renewed energy and
San Bernardino and the fruit growers
will demonstrate to the world that
they are equal to any emergency, and
will make the third National Orange
Show worthy of the great citrus indus
try which is represents.
The great fruit exhibit .tent, built
especially for the National Orange
Show, is now enroute from the manu
facturers, arid the indications are that-
every foot of space in the two grea?
IELIE1I DIES IN
MIL, BELIEVED TO
HAVEFROZEN
WAS PLACED IN CELL WITH NO
COT; HAD TO LIE ON COLD
CEMENT FLOOR
Thft KPRKinn nf tha AriVnno fnimfv j j .
v,4i. umj m&itjiiu ui over i cents as now
Assessors, which opened in Yuma yes- would be most beneficial to us. This
terday afternoon, has thus far proven ' lmportant matter is engaging the at- tents will be occupied by exhibitors
very interesting, and if the assessors tentlh of the assessors today.
find it possible to put into execution! Assessors are here from eleven Ari-
a few changes in our present system j zona counties. Thev are: I. F. Doyle,
of assessment it will prove of verv! Coconino; W. G. Dtinoan, Gila; X). D.
p-eat interest to a considerable num-j Phillips, Graham J. H. Frby, Green
ber of taxpayers, particularly that Iee w- T Williams, Navajo; George
lass which is best able to pay a just'E- Truman, Pinnl- T. E. Campbell,
snare or tne- taxes, out, by evasion,
or flaws in the present laws, pays but
a comparatively small sum, while thr
man with a small farm, or a town lot
or two, pays the limit.
The large mining companies are the
most persistent, and the foreign stock
holders, in many instance1?, ptv rrore
income tax in England on thpir Ari
zona incomes than they pay taxes on
their Arizona properties.
To correct these evils is the logical
aim of the meeting of assessors and,
eventually, it will he done because the
people are "seeing the light" and a
change must result.
The assessment of all property at
ts market value is being considered,
i natural result of which would mean
a reduction of the tax rate to one-half
or one-fourth of what it is now, and
would place Arizona in a favorable
Ight before the investors of the world.
With the valuation of Yuma county
doubled and the rate reduced to lVs
or 2 cents on a dollar's worth of prop-
Yavapai; A. B. Ming, Yuma; J. W.
Bogan, Pima; J. T. Bonf- Maricopa;
E. A. Hughes, Cochise. Twicity as
sessors are present. R. L. Pjnyon,
of Globe, and C. H. Colman, of Yuma:
The two last mentioned were elected
to membership at this session. ;
P. J. Miller and Charles R. Howe,
of the State Land Commission, and'
Deputy County Assessors H. S. Ross
of Cochise and H. H. Holbert of Pima
who- were present were invited to
take seats with the members of the
0
BIG
WILL AOD 4 I
ACRES TO
VALLEY
LAND IN BUCKEYE VALLEY WILL
BE, DRAINED AND PLACED
UNDER IRRIGATION
DOUGLAS,, Ariz., Jan. 10. John G.
Holt, an employee of the "Copper
Queen smelter, was found' dead in
the city jail Wednesday morning. Holt
got off shift at 11 o'clock last night
and it is reported, became intoxicated.
He was arrested at about midnight.
He was placed in a cell in .which .there
was no cot and had to lie on the ce
ment floor.
There were three blankets in the
cell, but when found thve blankets were
not over him. Physicians said the
man died from" heart failure. The
general report about the city during-
the day was that the man had frozen.
The temperature reached six , below
zero.
PHOENIX, Jan. 10. Four thousand
EW GOVERN
OR
Wii m THE LID
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo., Jan. 13.
Elliott M. Major was inaugurated gov
ernor of Missouri at noon today in the
assembly chamber of the temporary
capital. Both branches of the' legisla
ture were assembled there, as well
as members of the supreme court, in
coming Btate officers and Governor
Hadley and the retiring officers. The
hall was lavishly decorated and the
balconies were thronged with specta
tors. Immediately after taking the
oath, Governor Major delivered his in
augural address.
A pedigree is a guarantee
of quality When you buy a bull
you look up his ancestors The Stickney Engine has
a pedigree Look it up.
E. F. Sanguinetti
E. F. Sanguinefti-Kardware Dept.-Main Store Yuma, Ariz.
acres of land in the Buckeye valley
association and take part, in the dis-VVe drained and placed under irri-
cussions. . - ,,' ....
ff, , m Kauon as soon as"ine avaname supply
1 P : : j i -v - .
E. Camnbell. Dresident: George e. Vi vv,1LCi 15 muieaseu uy me construe-
Truman, vice president, and E. a. 0n a new .supply ditch. "This ditch
Hughes, secretary were all present .wu extend frpm the-present head of
and assumed their respective, ppsi, the, Buckeyercanal 36 miles - up the
tjons . Aua .Jbna.anu win cost approximate-
The meetings are being held at t' ly $40'000- '
courthouse, and it is possible that to- , At . present 16,000- acres' of Buckeye
night may see the end of the .sessions. Tajley land are. under cultivation. Ex-
though-it may be found impossible to cept for a period of about 60 days in
conclude until tomorrow. I the , summer, there is ample , water to
irrigate, the entire 20i000 acres. Dur
ing, .that .60, days, however about'2,000
I inches, in addition to the supply avail
able with the present dam arid canal,
.is. required.
Last summer the directors of the
Buckeye Irrigation Company made" an
appropriation for the purpose of in
vestigating the development of an ad
ditional water supply, in order thai
stock for the other 4,000 acres might
be sold and that land added to the
cultivated area of. the valley Engi
neer W. A. Farish was employed to ;
irivestigate and report. .-.Engipee? Far
ish .has just submitted "his final re
port , - ,
:
TMTftflTI
ruifiiij
iC simplicity.
efficiency,
low cost of
mnintenance
ITS - '
-v- r
The Laync Patent Multi-Stac Enclosed Shaf t
Centrifugal Pump and Screeii. Sacddacsaot trouble
VRITE-FOR CATALOG NO. 75
laync & Bowler Corp.
902-910 Santa Fe Aye. (Cor. Violet)
LOS ANGELES. CAL.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
FOR CHILDREN 1 to. 8 years
MASKED HJj
SU
1 isms
0 01
SCAPE MONEY IN IDEAS
iff! lf5.SiBARD. '
--ry ' -ar- P3 team Si b 5 fftsx
KEEP YOUR SINK
TRAPS
CLEAN
B. T. B bbitt's Pure Lye or Potash cuts the grease
and dirt from sink pipes, saving plumber's bills. A
little Lye and a lot of Water for genera! Household
Gleaning and Disinfecting. Banish Dirt and Germs.
Great Labor and Money Saver. Valuable presents
for the labels. : : : :
Write for Inflict explaining many uses.
B. T. BABBIT
HEW YORK CITY
LOWELL, Ariz., Jan. 10. mask
ed men, Tuesday morning at 1.30-
o'clock, held.-up thg, Lowell bar and
robbed the saloon and two men who
were- placed at the,.point of Colt re
volvers, afterward maKIrig vgobd their
escape, and 'no .traces have: ben "found
of them so -far... '
At the .time 'the" bdndits? entered' the
place the bartender arid" ; fwo men
named John Blum and M. Wallacfc
were in the saloon. They poked re
volvers in the face of the bartender
and - the two me'rinanied;;" arid, qqrii
pelled them io -stand up beside the
wall "during the robbing" process. '
While one of. the men went behind
the bar to rifle the cash register, the
other held the. men- quiet with two
ugly-looking revolvers, one in either
hand. The robbers secured a little
more than $150 from the cash till.
$25 from. Blum and $18 fronf Wal
lace. After they had the money
safely in their pockets they bade the
trio a polite farewell and backed out
into the darkness of the night and
disappeared.
Bell. Howe, Singer, and other millionaire
Inventors began life as poor boys. Fortunes
nwait other inventors. Can YOU think of
something to patent? America's greatest
inventor tells HOW TO INVENT
in a booklet sent to you free by
COPP & CO., Patent Attor
neys, 745 8th St., Washing
ton, D.C. Be sure to name
this newspaper in your letter.
Ask Editor about cost of Patent.
OVER 65 YEARS
EXPERIENCE
' F9WW 11
Trade Marks
. v. o,"""ii " oivciuu auu uBBcnpiion may
nntckly ascertain our opinion free whether an
liiTnntinn l9Tirnhghlrnnt.nf.hio .
Hons strictly confidential. HANDBOOK onPatenS
3ent free. Oldest agency for securing- patents.
Patents taken through Jlnnn & Co. receive
tpecial notice, without charge, in the
Scientific American.
A. handsomely illustrated weekly. Lnreest clr.
dilation of any scientlQo Journal. Terms $3 a
1fV"i;f2?r0ths,5U So'dbyall newsdealers.
MUNN & Co.36lBroadwy. New York
Branch Office, (325 P St. Wasblnston. D. C.

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