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Arizona sentinel and Yuma weekly examiner. (Yuma, Ariz.) 1911-1915, January 30, 1913, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060876/1913-01-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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6 BRIDGE BILL IS OUT OF O
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COMMITTEE ,
(Western Union Telegram)
WASHINGTON, D. C, Jan.
22. (To Geo. Michelsen, Yuma,
Ari.) Senate committee on In
dian Affairs, of which I am a
member, recommended the ap
propriation of 25,000 to assist
in the construction of a bridge
across the Colorado at Yuma,
and I am watching the matter
at every step.
' HENRY F. ASHURST..
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VOLUME XLTII. NUMBER 11.
osbom iiiiis profit
SECRETARY OF STATE OSBORN
SUGGEST CHANGES TO BENE
FIT THE TAXPAYERS
PHOENIX, Jan. 2S. Between Feb
ruary 14, 1912, the day on which Ari
zona became, a state, and December
31, the office of Secretary of State
Sidney P. Osborn collected .$42,189.25.
The expenses of the office for that
period, including all salaries, were $18,
562.44, leaving a net profit of more
than $20,000.
Secretary Osborn thinks this profit
entirely too great and he will say so
in reports that he is now preparing
for submission to the governor and
legislature.
The report to the governor will be
-submitted within two or three days,
..and the one to the legislature ;,sh.6rt
time after that body meets jn special
session. The one going to the legis
lature will point out the necessity of
revising the election laws. "Various
changes in other laws affecting the
secretary's office will be strongly ad
vocated. . TORONTO, Ont, Jan. 28. A rush
of applicants is expected at the office
of provincial secretary of Ontario foi
positions as "liquor tasters" under the
newly organized movement for gov
ernmental supervision of all the drink
ables on sale at public bars and hotels.
TOPEKA, Kas., Jan. 28. By a vote
of the two branches of the Kansas leg
islature today, William H. Thompson,
a Democrat, was named to succeed
Charles Curtis, Republican, in the
United States sen?"
!L Til IT
IN OFFiGE TOO
GREAT
RUSH FOR PLAGE
IS LIQUOR TASTER
Kansas elects -thomson
seutor
S AFFORD, Jan. 2S. The council
"has finally passed an ordinance per
mitting the Standard Oil company t
erect buildings and store oil Hear the
;Safford depot The matter had receiv
ed considerable agitation, as large
.meetings of the chamber of commerce
-civic league and citizens had declared
;in favor of granting the permission,
but' a number of adjoining property
owners, headed by Attorneys Mc
;gowan and Dial, put up very strenu
ous objections. The mass meeting
. held at the schoolhouse was one of
the hottest ever held in Safford.
LABORER FINDS $15,000
NEW HAVEN, Conn., Jan. 2S. A
workman passing through a lumber
.yard on the east side found a bundle
of $15,000 wortn of securities which
were stolen last July from the salt
of Louis .Bernfield.
Taxe
WRONG SUP
IN TH
WASHINGTON, D. C, Jan. 2S
Now that the novelty has worn off the
parcel post, officials are bending their
energies toward taking some of the
"kinks" out of the system. The most
common mistake so far is the use ot
1 ordinary postage stamps for the mail
ing of the parcels. The law specifi
cally provides that "distinctive
stamps" be affixed to packages sent
by the system. This is in order that
by keeping track of the sale of these
special stamps the postoffice depart
ment may gain an exact knowledge of
how generally the( service is used.
Postoffice officials have announced
that a number of complaints that par
cel post zone maps were in error, were
founded on misapprehension. It was
said that patrons frequently overlook
ed the fact that -some cities are not sit
uated in the exact center of a unit, and
labored under the misapprehension
that the first zone of approximately
"0 miles should be described with the
ity as center, when the fact was that
the geological center of the unit in
-which the city was located was made
the center.
Even dinners are, being sent by par
cel post.. Four bachelor ranchmen,
living on adjoining farms eight miles
from Lake Arthur, N. M., are eating
dinner every day, with Uncle Sam,
RAN CIS E. WARREN
AGAIN WYOMING'S
SE
RECEIVED FIFTH ELECTION AT
TH HANDS OF THE WYO
MING LEGISLATURE
CHEYENNE, Jan. 28. Senator
jFrancis E. Warren today received his
mfth election to the United States sen-
late at the hands of the Wyoming leg
islature when both houses gave him
:i major', over his Democratic op-
Hponent, John B. Kendrick.
Representative Manson, who cham
pioned the Progressive cause, refused
Pto cast his n ballot for either candi
date.
. S. TO ATTEMPT 36QC-
1LE WIRELESS TALK
WASHINGTON, Jan. 28. With the
Arlington wireless station and the
.scout cruiser Salem, the navy depart
ment is about to attempt a 3000-mile
wireless conversation.
The House naval committee was in
formed that the department is fitting
out the Salem at Philadelphia with a
powerful radio apparatus, and plans
to send her to a point somewhere off
the coast of Spain to ascertain wheth
er she can pick up messages sent by
the wireless station here.
Dr. E. B. Ketcherside yesterday re
ceived a letter from Dr. Thomas J.
Pugh, who recently moved to Pearisall,
Texas.
AND
YUMA,
. serving as waiter. The meal Is cooic-
ed at Lake Arthur, and then dispatch
ed by parcel post. A parcel post
lunch in a dinner pail interested Cin
cinnati, Ohio. J. J. Murphy could not
: wait for his wife to pack his lunch
so she sent it by parcel post. He re-
' ceived it in time. There were sand-
: wiches, beans, lemon pie and lots of
goodies.
Human ashes were jailed by par
cel post from St. Louis, Missouri, to
Ewardsville, 111. Preparations for
the funeral of Frederick Neumann, at
Edwardsville,xhad been made when it
i was learned that his will directed that
' his body be cremated. The body was
1 taken to St. Louis for cremation and
j the ashes were sent back.
To save a cent, an Erie county, Ohio,
farmer sent a "package of scent" to
the postoffice at Painsville, Ohio, for
I parcel post delivery and aroused considerable-dissent
on the part of Post
master Moody. The package was wrap
j ped in brown paper and contained sev
eral fine skunk skins, 'frozen. The
bundle was tossed into a corner or
the postoffice where it was rather
warm. Then the skins thawed. The
owner was sent for and forced to take!
charge of them. He left the package
in the street until the skins froze and
then carried them home.
PRIZE FIGHT
DIES FfiH HM
"CHICK" ROSE KNOCKED UNCON
SCIOUS, FAILS TO RECOVER;
OPPONENT IS ARRESTED
NEW YORK, Jan. 28. "Chick"
Rose, a prize fighter, who was knock
ed unconscious in Brooklyn last night
by a blow on the chin in the sixth
round of a 10-round bout with "Sail
or" Smith, died.early today in a hos
pital. Smith and the referee were ar
rested. TURNS
FIER 42 YEARS
EL CENTRO, Jan. 28. Years ago,
when Kansas was first settled by the
covered wagon pilgrims, a young man
and his bride quarreled and separated.
That was forty-two long years ago.
The young woman was Alice Clothier
and the man was a brother of Mrs.
George Dixon's mother, Mrs., W. B.
Billings, of El Centro, which makes the
story have local interest.
The young couple parted and went
their ways. After long years of wait
ing, the bride married another. Years
passed and the second husband died.
The widow married again and the
third died within a few years.
And a few days ago the first hus
band, aged and gray, turned up in the
Kansas home city o fthe bride of. 42
years ago.
Rumor has it that they , may be mar
ried again.
ROSE,
Be Paid on Full Cash
YUMA WEEKLY EXAMINER
ARIZONA, THUR SDAY, ' JANUARY
THE U. S. R. S. HAS INVESTED IN
TWENTY-FJVE BIG PROJECTS
AT EXPENSE OF $68,000,000
YUMA PROJECT RANKS THIRD
TOTAL RECEIPTS FROM ALL PROJ
ECTS UNDER WAY ESTI
MATED AT $77,000,000
FOLLOWING REPORT WITH TAB
ULATED SUMMARY GIVES
INTERESTING "DOPE"
ON THE RECLAMA
TION WORK
The present moment is- a proper one
to point out just 'what the United
States Reclamation Service has ac
complished. The details follow:
The act of Congress approved June
17, 1902, known as the "Reclamation
Act," created a fund for the reclama
tion of the arid lands from the moneys
received from the sale of public lands
in certain of the Western states and
territories, excent the 5 per cent, of
the proceeds of such sales set aside by
law for education and other purposes.
The estimated total receipts from this
source to June 30 1912, are $77,612,
201.41. Th net investment of this fund
in reclamation works on June 30, 1912,
amounted to $69,858,216.93.
The act requires the Secretary of
the Interior to determine the estimat
ed cost of construction. Entrymen
and private landowners receiving any
water from reclamation projects are
therefore required to contribute their
proportion of the cost of construction,
operation and maintenance of the proj
ect wherein their lands are situated.
The cash receipts from this source to
June 30, 1912, were: Building repay
ments, $2,156,422.75, and operation and
maintenance, $877,825.82.
In addition, sales of water to towns
and cities, leases of power developed
on the projects, rentals or carrying
charges for irrigation water, miscel
laneous sales of old materials, etc.,
have produced -an additional return of
$3,1S9,275.56. Reimbursement for the
work done for the Indian Service now
amounts to $1,581,236.62. Under the
respective laws authorizing these
transactions this amount is credited
as a reduction of. the cost of the
projects.
No new projects have been under
taken "since 1906, but prior to that date
twenty-five primary projects had been
undertaken, the net investment in
which on June 30, 1912, amounted to
$68,823,171.56, as shown in the follow
ing table: y
(Continued on Pase Four'4"
BEVERIDGE TO ERECT BUILDING
CHICAGO, 111., Jan. 28. Ex-Senator
Beveridge of Indianapolis will erect
a building costing $125,000 near the
central business district here.
The Examiner office for job work
I Irs H Ju
30 ; M3
"S?h, 99Sf"
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MEMBERS OF THE FIRST ARIZONA STATE LEGISLATURE
Below will be found a complete list of the members of the Legis
lature which will convene in its second extra session on the 3rd of
February. The list includes all members of the House and Senate,
together with the county from which they come, and their politics:
. SENATORS
Maricopa County
C. B. WOOD (D)
H. A. DAVIS (D)
Cochise County
C. M. ROBERTS (D)
W. P. SIMS
Yavapai County
HOMER WOOD (D)
M. G. CUNNIFF (D)
Pima County
A. A. WOLSLEY (D)
JOHN T. HUGHES (D)
Apache County
.LORENZO HUBBELL (R)
Navajo County
JOHN T. WILLIS (R)
Coconino County
FRED S. BREEN (R)
Gila County
ALFRED KINNEY (D)'
J. F. HECHTMAN (D)
Greenlee County
. GEORGE M. CHASE (D)
Yuma County
FRED W. WESSEL
Pinal County
J. F. BROWN
Mohave County
HENRY LOVIN (D) '
Graham County x
W. W. PACE (D)
Santa Cruz County
J. H. HARRISON (D)
REPRESENTATIVES
Maricopa County
DON C. BABBITT (D)
GEORGE F. COCKE (D)
J. A. R. IRVINE (D)
LEON S. JACOBS (D)
DANIEL P. JONES (D)
HARRY JOHNSON (D)
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UTE INDIANS ADOPT THE
AMES OF NOTED
PE
COLORADO REDMEN BOAST OF
' "ELIHU ROOT," "CHAMP
CLARK," ETC.
WASHINGTON, D. C
Jan. 28. ,
The Indian Bureau census recently
taken of the Ute Indians in Southwest
ern Colorado, who a few days ago de
fied the state authorities when they
tried to arrest one of the band, shows
that the redmen have in their tribe
of less than 500 persons a remarkably
large number of celebrities. -They
have an "Elihu Root," also a "Chanii,
Clark," and a "Ward Beecher." One
of their m.n has been given the Eng
lish name of. Virgil Clark, while Jan
anese heroes have given rise to "Oy
ama Coyote" and "Togo Weeks." one
of their women being "Kate Field."
In choosing surnames the Utes have
picked some of the choicest they
could find, among them Adams, Ban-
croft, Kingsley, Beecher, Brooks, Mills,
Browning, Harrison, Marsh, Howe,
Lang and Peabody. One hears the
proud name of Fatty Burr Clark while
others sign themselves Babe Brown
and Babe Deer. '
Beichteler Bros., Sunday, shipped
twenty-eight ostriches, to a purchaser
in Salt River Valley. ' '
Value
Reclamation
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Cochise County
SAM BRADNER (D) .
J. M. BALL (D)
GEORGE CRAIG (D)
C. B. KELTON (D)
W. J. GRAHAM (D)
, . A. G. CURRY (D)
J. F. DUNCAN
Yavapai County
P. J. WREN D)
PERRY HALL (D)
1 H. H. LINNEY (D)
A. A. MOORE (D)
Pima Cpunty
J. W. BUCHANAN (D)
KIRK T. MOORE (R)
PRANK L. CROWFOOT (R)
Apache County '
. N. GONZALES (R)
Navajo County
FRANK O. MATTOX (D)
Coconino County
i THOMAS MADDOCK (R)
Gila County
WILLIAM E. BROOKS (D)
'J. TOM LEWIS (D)
JOHN wmURVHY .(D)
Greenlee County
M. H. KANE (D)
W. M. WHIPPLE (D)
Yuma County
THOMAS DRENNAN (D)
J. R. KERR (D)
Pinal County
ALEXANDER BARKER (D)
Mohave County
JOHN ELLIS (D)
' Graham County '
A. E. JACOBSON (D)
A. R. LYNCH (D)
Santa Cruz County.
HARRY SAXONi (D)' ,
T AS
CHARACTER III SKETCH
LONDON, Jan. 28. Auguste Van
Biene, known to theatrical audiences
all over the world as the composer
and player of "The Broken Melody,"
died on the stage of the Hippodrome
at Brighton, just as his characteriza
tion of the old music master had
died 6,000 times in Van Biene's vaude
ville act.
The hauntins: refrain of "The Broken
ftiei0(jy na(j inspired audiences in
many countries before its composer
brought its career to an end.
"If I had not -done so," he 'once
said, "it would have driven me to a
lunatic asylum.
UNITED STATES SELLS
AEROPLANE FOR DUTY
CHICAGO, Jan. 28. The monoplane
operated by George Mestach in Che
fatal collision which resulted in the
death of Howard Gill at the aviation
meet held here last fall, was sold at
auction today by the United States
collector of customs for failure to pay
duty on the machine,
It is said to be the first time that
a flying machine has been sold by the
government, none having been here-
tofore confiscated.
Captain J. Nr Bickal is out again J
after an illness of over a week..
t
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OF CONSTRUCTION O
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. While the main construction
work in connection with this
project was being accomplished
most actively, there were 1800
men and 2300 animals engaged
on the various jobs. The entire
project has been in course of
construction for seven years,
and it is estimated it will take
two years to fully complete the
work outlined. Construction
at the present time is confined
to extensions of the canal and
levee system. Councilman H.
S. Fay at San Diego.
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ARIZONA SENTINEL FOUNDED 1872
Projects
E
F
FEAR REPORT OF VETERINARIAN
WILL LEAD TO AN EXTEN
SIVE INSPECTION
DOUGLAS, Jan. 28. Douglas stock
men are uniformly anxious over the
report that the state veterinarian and
the bureau of animal industry will
probably carry on a very extensive
inspection of Cochise county for the
purpose of quarantining all suspect
ed portions. They also propose to. dip
all herds in the county.
The local cattlemen contend that
there are at most but two tick .in
fected, or rather suspected, districts.
One is to the east of Douglas and the
other to the north and west. These
districts will be under fence In the im
mediate future. Local cattlemen, from
the sections referred to say that they
will be more glad to have the 1ord
look out for the drift fences. They
are also anxious to "see" a "Hue fen
between Arizona and New Mexicti
which has been proposed, .established
at the earliest possible time.
ARIZONA LOST
HER FIRST VOTE
WASHINGTON, D. C, Jan. 28.
LOST" the electoral vote of Arizona
and its bearer. Finder please send to
the ofice of the vice president"
The Arizona senators and Represen
tative Hayden, of the baby state of
Arizona, sent out the foregoing notice
when the time limit for receiving the
returns of the national election ex
pired. WASHINGTON, D. C, Jan. 28.
Wilfred T. Webb, the missing Arizona
messenger appointed to bring the elec
toral returns here, telegraphed Sena
tor Ashurst today from New York,
saying he is on his way to Washing
ton.'
Webb made no explanation of his
tardiness.
According to law, Webb, by being
late, loses his mileage, which amounts
to $750; and is also subject to a fine
of $1,000. More important than that
in his own estimation, at least, he
will also likely lose whatever chance
he had to the United States marshal
ship for Arizona. The law is specific
in fixing the time limit for filing the
electon returns and in providing pen
alties for failure to comply. Accord
ing to the federal statute, a messen
ger will have to be sent to Arizona for
the returns.
OFFICERS SEEK
SLAYER OF BAN
HAYDEN, Arizona, Jan. 28. A Mex
ican was killed at the Ray mine, and
the officers have been notified to ar
rest Francisco Ramirez and hold him
on the charge of having done the kill-
ing.
hre.
He is known to have friends near
TEMPERATURES YESTERDAY
Maximum, 76: minimum, 55: hu-
jmidlty, 26 per cent

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