OCR Interpretation


Arizona sentinel Yuma southwest. (Yuma, Ariz.) 1915-1916, October 28, 1915, Image 2

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95060877/1915-10-28/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

HJMA DAILY EXAMINER
(Member Associated Press)
k Thinking Paper for Thinking People
Established March 17, 1806
" W. H. SHOREY
Editor apd Proprietor
SUBSCRIPTION RA1ES
Per Year $$.,00
Per Month 76
Entered at Yuma. Arizona, as second
class mail.
Published daily, except Sunday.
BARD INTER-OCEAN
Established January 20, 1911
SUBSCRIPTION RATE
Per Year $2.00
Entered at Bard, Imperial county,
California, as second class mail.
Published Friday.
ELECTION IN STATE OF
NEW YORK
In New York State, in ad
dition to the suffrage issue
a dominant feature of the
election will 'be the question
of adopting a new state con
sntution as revised dv a re
cent constitutional conveh
tion, presided over by Elihu
Root. The new constitution
at the'request of the suffrage
leaders, has not been made to
include the suffrage amend
ment. hence the constitution
and the suffrage issue will be
voted upon separately, neith
er question having anything
to do directly with the fate of
the other.
The features of the revised
constitution are measures de
signed to give the cities o:
the state greater latitude in
the management of munici
pal affairs, and coincident!)
to relieve the legislature o4
a vast amount of local mat
ters; to make the governor z
more responsible individual
by making the numerous ex
ecutive arms of the adminis
tration more directly respon
sible to him, to reform the ju
diciary so as to eliminate
some of the red tape that is
declared to handicap the
- prompt execution fha-daw-l
and among othec provisions,
the short ballot and the bud
get system.
Two important articles, re
lating to taxation and reap
portionment will be submit
ted to the voters, separate
from the general constitu
tional question.
Two other separate amend
ments would provide for a
$27,000,000 bond issue to
complete the Barge Canal,
and to permit the legislature
to alter the rate of interest
on certain state debts already
incurred.
Although the Republicans
were in a majority in the con
vention, they are not a unit
in supporting the new consti
tution, nor are the Democrats1
standing solidly against it.
In personnel, the New
York election calls for the
choice, of a full assembly of
150 members, eleven supreme
'court justices and three con
gressmen, as well as county
and city officials in some sec- j
tions of the state. j
Congressional successors
are to be chosen to Joseph A.
Goulden, Democrat, of the
23d district, and Edwin A.
Merritt, Jr., and Sereno E.
Payne, of the 31st and 36th,
respectively, who died while
serving in the last Congress.
The candidates are: Wm. S.
Bennett, Republican, and
Elsworth J. Healy, Democrat
both of New York, in the 23d
district; Bertrand H. Snell,
of Potsdam, Republican; W.
L. Allen, of Malone, Demo
crat, and Howard D. Hadley,
of Pittsburgh, Progressive.
in the 31st district; and Nor-
o r 11 . r r
1 T T T.I !
MTlfl I fillip I I If'nT flT
Geneva, Democrat, in 36th
district.
SOME NOVEL THEORIES
IN EDUCATION
Startling and revolution
ary theories were advanced
in a recent lecture given by
Mrs. Winifred Sackviile J
Stoner, author and educator,
before the students of the
University of Southern Cali
fornia.
Mrs. Stoner is the mother
of the 13-year-old prodigy,
Winifred, who speaks eight
languages, has written and
published ten books, and is
now lecturing in an eastern
university. Winifred spoke
Greek and English at 17
months.
Mrs. Stoner believes thai
much of the present educa
tional system is badly adapt
ed to prepare the students fur
the important things of life.
"The most vital thing in
the world," she told her heai
ers, "is parenthood. The
schools and colleges make a
big mistake when they do not
prepare their students to be
intelligent fathers and moth
ers." She then confidently
told the young men present
how to pick out a wife. "Find
a girl whose mouth turns up
at the corners, to prove that
she smiles more than she
scowls," she advised them.
Mrs. Stoner believes that
all examinations should be
abolished.
"Examinations do not show
'.low well the student has
studied, but how badlv the
teacher has taught," she re
marked. "In Germanv there
vere hundreds of suicides
ast year among overwrough
pupils at examination time
there are just two purposes
n education: Self contro
ind theoy of service. Wh'at
2ver makes for these is iood
ducation. The seven foun
dation stones of happines;
ire heredity, environment
gooa neaitn, cnaracter, amni
rion, efficiency, and love."
ELECTION IN STATE OF
MASSACHUSETTS -
ONE-FIFTH OF THE U. S.
TO VOTE TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 2
England has barred treating, but
we understand that setting up exer
cises will continue in favor'on the big
drill grounds. Columbia State.
Massachusetts, in. addition
o the suffrage amendment,
will vote next Tuesday on the
proposition of giving the leg
slature authority to impose a
rax on incomes, ana similar
authority for the taking over
of land in country districts
or the purpose of establish
ng homesteads for those who
may wish to escape from the
ongested quarters of the
ities.
A successor to Governor
David I. Walsh, Democrat, is
be elected and the candi
dates, including Governor
Walsh, are: Nelson B. Clark,
rogressive; Samuel W. Mc-
Call, Republican; William J.
Shaw, Prohibition ; Walter S.
Hutchins, Socialist, and also
eter O'Rourke, Socialist-
Labor.
A lieutenant Governor and
arious other state officials,
.ogether with forty senators
and 240 members of the big
state house of representa
tives are also to be elected.
ELECTION IN STATE OF
NEW JERSEY
Having disposed of the suf
frage issue at the special elec
tion, October 19, New Jersey
has left little of general inter
est for tire election of Nov. 2.
Voting on this day will be
confined to the election of 6
members of the state senate,
and a full membership or
in the house. The campaign
has been very quiet, no state
wide issues being involved.
In some legislative districts,
local option has been an is
sue.
Eight States New York,
Massachusetts, Maryland,
New Jersey, Pennsylvania,
Kentucky, Ohio and Missis
sippi will hold elections on
Tuesday, November 2.
In four of these states
Massachusetts, Maryland,
Kentucky and Mississippi
governors are to be elected;
in six states New York,
Massachusetts, Maryland,
New Jersey, Kentucky and
Mississippi the- state legis
latures, in whole or in part,
are to be elected, and in five
states New York, Massa
setts, Maryland, Pennsylva
nia and Ohio, important. con
stitutional issues are to be de
cided. With a few local excep
tions, in fact, these constitu
tional questions will be the
dominant issues on election
day, inculding as they do
such fundamental matters as
woman' suffrage, municipal
home' rule, prohibition, state
income taxes, referendum
plans and some lesser re
forms. The woman suffrage ques
tion will come, up for decision
n New York, Pennsylvania
and Massachusetts, which big
states will furnish, in point
3f population, the greatest
rest the suffrage "issue has
2ver had in the United
States. New lersev. the
:irst state in the East to vote
Dn equal. suffrage, defeated
the proposition at a special
3lection given over exclusive-
y to the suffrage question on
October 19. While it has
been held by some political
observers that the result o.s
the test in New Jersey would
3e reliably indicative of what
might be expected in 'the 3
"upper neiPhhnnno s ta tes .
the suffrage leaders have not
bebn discoifraged by the big
majority with which the is
sue was defeated in New Jer
sey, and lookjorward to the
rigger test with confidence.
The importance of this test
s indicated by the fact that,
n point of , population, the
states of New York, Pennsyl
ania and Massachusetts,
which will vote on suffrage
November 2, include over
20,000,000 people a fifth of
:he population of the entire
United States and these
20,000,000 are practically
double the population of the
states in which eaual suf
frage has as yet been fully
achieved.
NON-PART1 SAN DIRECT
PRIMARY LAW OF
'CALIFORNIA
D. C. Rose is receivrng a visit from
his brother of Millfield, Ohio.
Two campaign organiza
tions, aligned cnierly on op
posite sides of the so-called
sides of the so-called "non
partisan direct primary law
of California, are makine
heir final efforts to reach
the voters who will cast
their ballots tomorrow at the
special state election for and
nine constitutional
amendments and two refer-
ndum measures.
A' coalition committee,
composed of representatives
rom several parties co-oper
ated with independent party
representatives against the
non-partisan bills. .
Gov. Hiram W. Johnson
and other officials and citi
zens conducted a state-wide
speaking campaign for the
eleven measures.
The opposition directed its
attack principally against the
primary and form of ballot
aws which, if carried, will
eliminate partv lines in the
egislature and on the re-
POSITIVELY ONLY BIG CIRCUS COMING THIS SEASON
Onljr Real Wild Animal Show on Earth
G.
BIG THREE RING WILD ANIMAL
"THE SHOW THAT'S DIFFERENT"
PERFORMING
ANIMALS
65
BIG SENSATIONAL
. ANIMAL ACTS
65
Performing Jungle-Bred Lions, Tigers, Leopards, Jaguars, Grizzlys, Cinnamon, Siberian and
Polar Bears, Elephants, Camels, Zebras, Zubas, Hyenas, Sacred Cattle, Kangaroos, Ourang-
Outangs, Apes, Chimpanzes, Monkeys, Mountain Goats, Dcfgs, Etc.
.
The 50 Musical Carrier Pigeons, "" " . '. 1
Tom, Dick, Harry, Horse-Riding Seals, 1 V-
Big Bill, Wrestling Grizzly, . r'r,
Mile. Florines' Performing Leopards,
Tot and Tiny, World's Smallest Performing Horses!,
Aerial Dogs and Monkeys, . 1 -. "i ,
Bob Chocolate and Black Knight, Tango Dancing Jofses,
Tom, Jerry and Louie, Horse-Riding African Lions? J
Performing. African Lions,
Six Educated Zebras.
Danger, Dynamite, Cactus. Gunpowder Just Mules,
Riding, Driving, Racing Ostriches,
The Comical Clown Pigs.
E
4
FULL GROWN AFRICAN LIONS
IN ONE ACT
WORLD'S CHALLENGE GROUP VALUE $50,000
24
Qmitantfl AERIAL LION rides in balloon, surrounded - shooting
dilippUlI Skyrockets. The most amazing wild animal acfextant.
HIGH-SCHQOL RIDING, DANCING AND MILITARY
HORSES AND PONIES
World's Premium Stock. Every one an Actor
40 ANIMAL CLOWNS 506 PEOPLE' 6 CONCERT BANDS
1 00 Animal Trainers Two Big Special Trains - Three Calliopes
Glittering Mile-Long Street Parade at 10:30 A. M.
Performances Rain or Shine, 2 and 8 p.m. Doors open at I and 7
SEE THE BIG FREE-TO-EVERYBODY ACT before the
main performances begin on the show grounds. You'll have time'after the parade
to get dinner arid then to the show grounds for the big free features.
WILL EXHIBIT AT
: 'YUMA'::
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER
10
mainder of the
already partly-
state ticket,
non-partisan
through previous legislation.
Other measures were the
nine constitutional amend
ments and the two referen
dum measures in the order in
which they appear on the
ballot:
1. Direct primary law
makes remainder of the state
ticket including legislators,
non-partisan. '
2. Form of ballot law
provides new form of ballot
and regulates its preparation
and handling.
v 3. Term of superior judges
constitutional amendment
extending term of superior
court judges from six to 12
years, except those elected
for unexpired terms.
4. Term of judges filling
vacancies a "constitutional
amendment providing that
appointees filling unexpired
terms in the supreme, district
court of appeal and superior
courts shall hold over until
their successors take office.
5. Rural credits consti
tutional amendment author
izing legislature to establish eral law a new system of tax
system of rural credits, lation under the supervision
r HpnnQit nf nnhlir nnhlici'Pf a taxation commission
mnne.vs a constitutional !'which shaI1 supersede board
amendment providing that
the legislature or the people
Kir on iniHoivP mPRIirfi mflV
determine how public funds raI amendment extending tax
shall hp. deposited: continue CAC1UF"U" lu "41W1 Ppw-
of equalization in 1919.
10. Exempting property
from taxation constitution-
in force present constitution
al regulations until such
rVi o n rroo ora m oHa
t ... .. i n tabling counties to modify
7. Initiative and referen-, . . -, ,
ty used for social service.
11. County charters con
stitutional amendment en-
dum constitutional amend
ment requiring two thirds
vote of electors to create any
bonded indebtedness and au-j
thorizing legislature to safe
guard initiative and referen
dum petitions from traud.
8. Condemnation for pub
lic purposes constitutional
amendment authorizing ttib
state, county or municipality
to acquire property for fu
ture needs and beyond its
confines under -certain re
strictions. 9. Taxation constitution
al amendment declaring leg
islature shall provide by gen-
ment.
MCHIIG DECISION
GQMPENSATiON AGT
MADISON, Wis., Oct. 27 Tne su
preme court today held that typhoid
fever contracted through drinking
water furnished by the employer, and
resulting in the death of. said employe
is an accident, and within the mean
ing of the workmen's compensation
act.
This decision is one of the most far
reaching of any announced by the
court since the compensation act was
enacted:." J

xml | txt