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The Mathews journal. (Mathews C.H. [Court House]) 1903-1937, October 17, 1912, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95067647/1912-10-17/ed-1/seq-2/

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P?ITuF?u^SWORD SEAR I
/ ) SCIENTISTS STOLID FACES
??9HiIN0T(>X. D. C\?'special.?
their faces and hi
o?*?p sears, some of them evidently
: tous < utS, many ?>f
tan .i( ii gates t<> tin- fifteenth
onu5 Coi on Hygiene
Demography M ? cted at
1 nacqualntwd
with German college customs, who
not know that th
honorable n rerstty clubi
-who '
hed <!? I
.1 who B
more than ten SU
; i renl pa I
-
I
W. W. I., r. ? I >r.
eilt? and I
who
? ;u
uni- !
- the duels I
? I head. !
Duels \- a Sport.
"Th< really
; >eked upon In
most of them
I Dr. Weber. "They ?
it Is very sei- ;
lied, and 1 think !
than
on ' otball which
play.
"In most ol ? German uni
I berg, there I
i lube, somewhat
to the fraternities In Anieri
K\\ the students ri?> not
i them, as they are expen
of the students are
time to them. There
? ndly rivalry between the clubs.
ry two weeks or so the clubs
.rs, which means a friendly
BRYAN AND WILSON
IN CONFERENCE
OLN, NEB.-? Special.?Govcr
Woodrow Wilson, prealdentlal
nom ' mocratlc party, and
William .'. Bryan, three times Demo
ndldate for the same office,
a heart-to-heart talk here Monday
situation through
the country. Both unhesitatingly
I a 1 ?emocratic victor).
In the sun parlor of Falrvlew, Mr.
n'a home, the veteran campaigner
omer In national polities,
for a few hours before the Gover
ln left, discussing tin- pro
npaign, but with par?
ticular reference to the Rocky Moun
tvhere Mr. Bryan had just
pleted a six weeks' tour.
"Wi did not have time to go into
.lie matter very thoroughly," said Gov
r Wilson. "We sat up late B
y ni^iit and agreed to a method
of handling the mountain states. That
it."
The Governor old not think it would
to the Pacific ?east.
"We are keeping open the last two
and a half weeks of the campaign,
however, and 1 do not know yet what
impaign committee will make
..m. i set out to make trips In the
ipaiga, but the local committees
have been making tours out of them."
The Governor was delighted with
ption in Nebraska "1 think
demonstration in Lincoln was very
remarkable, Indeed," he said. "1 !?
had s splendid time, especially with
Mr. Bryan." The crowd assembled at
Lincoln was estimated at 00,000.
The candidate again spoke proudly
of the fact that his "lucky number"
followed him in Lincoln. He OCCU
room No. 11 :! at a hotel, which
D Thirteenth Street, and delivered
h at the auditorium, bes.
making thirteen speeches in Nebrai
The Governor and his host, Mr.
Bryan, went together to the West?
minster Presbyterian Church, where
Mr. Bryan la an elder. After the
services the congregation gathered
around the two men and an informal
ption followed
WAGE SCALE TO
BE ADJUSTED
BOASOKE, VI*? Special_The
general cosnmlttec of the l'*<*d<?
rated Trades of tin- Norfolk and
Western Railroad, in whi?-li Bine
?l?ft?-r?-iit trail?* unions are in?
volved, coaaprlslag soase c,ooo
men in all. are in t-onfereiue
with the officials of the i?a?l with
a view of adjusting a wage s*-ub*
for the y??ar ami the adoption Of
Morking rules. A Straight in
creaee of thr?*?* ?cuts ?ht hour Is
lieing deaaS?ded. Tin? ?-?inference
will last s?'\?*rul days.
HULLS TAKE Of HORNS
WHEN BILLY BUTTS IN
NEW YORK.? Special.?It was a
great day for the bulls in Reading on
the stock exchange Monday. Barney
Bartsch, Harry Content, Jakey Field
and all the other big traders on the
long si?ie were dealing In thousands
Of shares in a rising market and mak?
ing the quotation to suit themselves,
with the public trailing after. There
was a big crowd of brokers around
the Reading post watching the pyro
techalca.
Above the din arose the strident
voles of Harry Content, the veteran
who led the manipulation of Northern
Pacific when it sold at 51,000 a share
<-n May 9, 1901, when the Struggle
between Morgan and llarriman causeo
short but acute panic of that day.
enty-four and a half for 2,500
?eading!" cried Content. There was
a lull. Reading had opened at 172%,
and this was the high price of the
day. The crowd held its breath.
four and three quarters
for 10,900 Reading," came a piping
voice from Content's elbow. The
tied crowd turned and surveyed
with astonishment a little man whom
nobody recognised. Who was the
stranger who had the temerity to :
Harry Content not an eighth, but s
full Quarter above the high price of
tin- day for Reading?
"A Daniel com?- to judgment!"
sneered Field. The crowd jeer? d. The
little man smiled and repeated decls
.. "Seventy-four and three-quar
ng!"
i Content stopp? <i bidding. i
rtanged to a frown.
"Who is he?" was whispered in the
.. ?1.
Hurty, who know.?- ?
mi the floor, joined th.
"That's Billy Mitchell," said Hurty
rin.
afitchell?" came the in
"U'hy, Mitchell, of Gwathmey ??;?
He bids
100,000 bah without
turning a hair," said Hurty.
thousand shares of Stock is only pik
?
am Mitchell is one of the big
on the Cotton Exchai
lie is a membei >>f th. stock excha
ears on the floor. J (<?
was passing through the exchange on
his way to lunch when the excite?
ment in Reading attracted him. He
interested, decided
to take S hand, and then bid the big
bulls In Reading tt? a standstill. HI?
bid was within one-eighth of the hlgh
esrt price of the day. The atock
slumped thereafter and closed at 178.
Hellt. In sin-It contests ther.* is no at?
tempt t.. really hurt any on?-. Son
tinos they last hftoen mlnut?Bs
Wlun it is seen on?
the opponents is bl?eedlng too freely <>r
of helm? hurt, the flght
!. Tiny ;ir<> ."?imply gam?
r-oraetimee real fights occur,
is trouble bet ? i
resulting from various can
tin- OPPOU? picked.
not bo much cars Is exercised t<> pre?
vent the fighters from | urt.
There is not s<> much ?'fToit to protecl
< of th<
i duelling swords are
? i sometimes one or the other
testants ratch?ed
?? badly.
ir- u S?ho?>l Honor.
"The scars received In these sti
considered mon
m:iri<s of honor among the students,
but after tin* university days are over
the mi o look hack at them with lots
n. Often the men in the clubs
? r through i il Many
of ?'?<? wounds received leave scars
whi' h remain until the ? their
Wurkerl modestly admitted
thai si duel, and
? ed a sword tin the
r i ?-: i * ; side which <>:n! his life.
Bui last night he laughed over the
ml had lots of fun
calling the incident. He said it had
not endangered his health since his
uni' erslty d
ople In Europe understand what
?m.m university duel means," s.iid
Dr. Weber, th?* only one of the I
who speaks English, "but i f?-ar that
ir? the Cnited states our actions as
Btudents might he mlsundersto
Pie " make it plain that these arc
not r? ai duels or fights, but simply a
kiii' of game at which the German
uni' rslty students play, and is no
w-o* ? ? tiinn th?> American ?rain.- of
? il. This?" cuts really amount
?thing.4'
pted Mitchell's hid arm
the exploit did not cent him a ??? Tit.
but he had momentarily assumed a
Ity of fl,747,500. He went to
Eberlin'a and ate a forty
luncheon.
CHICKS' CLUCK TORTURES
TWO ART LOVINti SOULS
NEW YORK.? Special.?Say, for
stance, that you, s writti-, and your
wilt, an artist, sit in your rooms with
the tioith light windows at New
.?.?l you, the writer, are un
in whether to us?- "at length"
Instead of "finally," and your w
the artist, as she poises her brush,
undecided whether to j^o in for art
and make her painting realistic. <>r :'
s. i k money by impressionism, do you
.?
THAT, if a brood of chickens, h
Ing climbed through or over your
i? ni.?you hating chickens?and
cluck <>ut their presence with?
"Peep, peep," and sounds to that
narrow and specific efft
You (Note by the gifted reporter?
Ugh! Watch the copy editor stille
nlus by revamping this original style
of construction) (Note by the copy
? tutor?Hal Ha! Fooled!) might feel
just about us William a. Salisbury,
the writer and an editor of this city
and Near Rochelle.
And
11's wife, the artist,
Did, when, two months ago, having
constructed a fence t<> separate the
property of
.Mrs. Nellie H. Peck, wealthy widow
of the late Edward If. lVek. of Now
York, and their own artistic half acre.
Chickens, owned by Mrs. Peck,
scampered into the Salisbury grountla,
a, flowery, verdant and all the
other magasine things,
And just put literature and art
clean and clear on the celebrate?!
blink?
The ayes have it.
Wherefore, the writer got out with
his little K<?n one bright and sunny
morning nn?l,
With said m?MSenger of death.
Did. with malice aforethought and
malice afterthought.
Mow down, maim, cripple, wound,
destroy and just plain
Kill, ?very blamed chicken that
wasn't quick enough to dodge a t?rn
peramental aim.
The reason being.
That Salisbury dhln't know whether
he was describing a Balkan battle or
S fight between a Rhode Island Red
ami a black Wyandotte, or
Mrs. Salisbury a painting of an
Egyptian afternoon in a cigarette fac?
tory, or an egs-laying contest.
Following which Salisbury was reg?
ularly "pinched," found guilty and re?
leased on a suspended sentence.
? Still?
The chickens came.
And the happy couple, feeling that
their work was interfered with, de?
cided that Mrs. Salisbury should take
h?BT easel to a colony at Woodstock,
X. Y . and there to show genius up.
While Salisbury remained on the
ancestral half-acre to beat his type?
writing machine into subjection.
Supplementing which there would
have been naught else to say had the
chickens remained at home.
But they were not of that breed.
So, one week day, the writer tripped
out into his chrysanthemum patch
and caught every chicken he could
grab.
lie caught two.
These he placed in his cellar and
then served a complaint on Mrs. Peck,
charg'ng her with permitting her
chickens to roam where they were not
in the lenst welcome.
Justice Samuel F. Swinburne was
to have heard all about it yesterday,
and you would have heard all about it
this morning,
If
The case had not been adjourned
until next W?-dnestiay.
in the meanwhile,
Mrs. Pick's son, Minor, declares
IT IS SPITE WORK.
While Salisbury th ?lares
IT IS NOT.
KILLS HIS SWEETHEART
THEN HIMSELF
PITTSBURG, PA. Special.?Because
pretty Grace Mapleson, aged lifteen,
spurned the advances of Joseph Kei
lerman, aged thirty-two, the lovesick
.u shot and dangerously wounded
her and then committed suicide in
the ; ils mother early
today.
Kellerman had called to renew his
it the girl marry him ana
when lo- met with repeated r? fusal
in shoot im-'.
eared.
"Oh, John," sobbed Mrs. John,
"l'\ ? something awful, and I
tost afraid to tell you ?but I
must: i made a most awful mistake
this morning and sent your new dress
suit to the rummage sa). d of
your ?ild one, and when 1 fourni out
what i had done and ran over t?> get
k it h.ni been sold."
"That's all right, Mabel, dear," said
John amiably. "1 stopped In at the
sale myself and bought it back for
thirty-five cents."?Judge.
\Y? hope that when the n?xt ?~!<-n
eral Aaeemblj convenes the need for
a better system of taxation will be
D by th?- legislators ami that they
will act accordingly.?Newport News
Presm
VJ ^
-_3^
I.OKI? ROBEBM KJTniEXEB.
UlIS.? Following anonymous
threats against his life, lx>rd Kitchen
<>f the Boer War, on his way
back to Egype from London, was sur?
rounded by detectives here. He will
1)?* heavily guarded fo long as he is
in France.
THINK DE PALMER
WILL RECOVER
THOUGH \<>T ?>ll OF DANGER,
Will KNOWN AI I?) RACER
is IMPROVED.
MILWAUKEE, HIS_Special.
Ralph De Raima's condition t?xik
a slight turn lor the Indter t?>
tlay. Although not out of clan
ger, phystelans dtcciared th?* fa?
mous auto drives' had a good
Ckhance i?> recov?er.
Deich Bragg eaptalaed hi*- po?
sition in tin* accident today.
"Although 1 kii?'w muh?' on?*
??ii? coming-." lu* said, "1 had not
tri??l to pull t?> ?m?' **l?Jo ?if Use
course t<? let him by, as there*
\\??ui?i n??t have ih*?'ii enongh room
for hitn to pa*.- at tlii-. point had I
given all use r<??in I could.*1
NO FLIRT, THIS GIRL
\\ El** IN AN 1IOVR
-JU_
nil' AGO. 1LI,. Special.?Five min
after John H, liiasley, titty-three
y?sars old, of Hammond, Ind., met Nel?
Brown, eighteen years old, Thure
?lay, to hire her aa a housekeeper,
they became engaged. An hour later
they were marri.
The (sirl admits the brevity of ac
quaintan?ce ami courtship, but Hlne
ley kijs he is not surprised in the
hast. He hail received "messages
from a higher force" which told him
of the coming marriage.
The bride is an orphan. She has
living with Mrs. William Dal
sell, of 4 su y Armitage Avenue. When
Hinaley ?ailed Mrs. Dalsell introduced
the pair ami said: "This girl is a
good housekeeper and a good girl,
ami you must not flirt with or annoy
h? r."
"Well," answered Ilinsley, sur?
prised, "maybe I'd better marry her
to prove my intentions are O. K."
WILL BUILD CEMETERY
NEAR WEAL/THY COLONY
NEW YORK. Special.?There is con
sternatlon among the wealthy colony
in the vicinity of rlerricka, I.. 1.,
where W, R. Grace, J. P. (..race.
Lieutenant Governor Sheehan, Justice
Pendleton, Howard Gould, Harry
Payne Whitney, Payne Whitney, W.
K. Vanderbllt, Jr., Clarence 11. Mae
kay and many ethers prominent in
business and club life have their coun?
try p!.
The board of supervisors of Nas?
sau county grant?-?! yesterday to Wil?
liam Hart, ?d Manhattan, r?-pr?-sent
|ng the Repose Mausoleum Company,
the right to lay out and erect build?
ings on the Isaac U. Willets farm for
cemetery purposes.
From now on members of the hunt?
ing s.t, when they invite friends to
sit on their porches and take them
through their groumls, will be con?
fronted by the structures on the ceme?
tery property. The permit states all
bodies must be placed in ?sealed
caskets and not put in the ground.
The runs of the Meadow Brook
hounds will also have to be materially
changed, as the WllletS farm was al?
ways a favorite line, the jumping be?
ing so good. Foxes could always be
raised in its thick underbrush, which
will all be removed now and laid out
in b?'?utiful grounds.
When the permission was first ask?
ed by the company in May a hearing
was set for July 8th, at which time
many wealthy colonists were present
and protested against the cemetery,
urging that their property would be
damaged and worthless as country
homes, as no one, they said, cares to
be constantly confronted with a grave?
yard.
The company is to pay to the local
school ?listrict f?ir school purposes $1
for each hotly placed in the vault, and
the same sum to tin- county for road
purpos?'S, tin- amount t.. be paid each
y?-ar.
MAN FINED FOR
INSULTING LADIES
K I C H MOXIL VA.?Specials
l ruin?e thttl lit* had l??-?-n ?Irink
in?i in e* teiiiinl Ion of Ids eoinliM't,
und decljtriiiu Un?! h<- it?tend?**?! no
osTesuae, l-:. P. < atiienrt ??a? fined
SV!.'? mill ftiHts lij .1 untie?- < rtitt-li
flel?! In Polle?*? t'onrt t??day ff??r In
l?-rf?-rliiK ?vlth inilie.n Sa llroud
Street.
TI??? numen of the la?ll?*N un- heinic
??l?ref?illv KiiHnlril by tin- |?<>lie?-.
other i ti h h ratattag that they are
niotlM-r nuil ?l?,iiiil?l?r?tlxr latter
befan* ntiont ei?iiii?*?'i? rears ol?l ?ml
jirel ty?-I lie police ?lecllue 1<? r?-\ ?'a!
their Meatlty.
(nth ear I ?.ium arreated Saturday
afternoon by 1'ollceitiMii llt-r I iicti
on complainl of the elder of the
tWS I a Mas. *>vli<? e??iiipli?ined that
the nui 11 dellhernlelv ntepped In
front of Iht-ni and refn?e?l l<> let
then? pann. II WVaa not In?? UK hi out
In ??? l?t?-u?-?-, or elinrKe?!. an far an
t-onld lie leariicil. that (allieart
Miiitl na? Ihinii olVeii*?!? ?? t?r tile
Inilli'.i, if, liulcnl, he naiil 1111} tltliiK
at all.
II ii|?i??-nrn li? lin??* l?eea the "?'
tlonn of ?In- man, mon- than nn.v
II1?1114 eine, thai olt'eixled the l?xlie*.
One of lli.-in alleged that t'ath
??111I ntepped i?|?ou her foot.
The ni'i'iiMi'il ??us ex?*eedinir;ly
penitent anil, while he tulmitle?!
the till'i-iiHC, he liliwneil hin eonill
1I1111 for hi? ?'?????lurl. When the
man atlmltieil IiIh iftillt, Ulli?* eine
vrnrn nald. 11ml it ?nan on hin own
admiK?aiin, rather than anvlhlnjr;
that either of the complainant*
m?l?l. that canned Junthc John to
Impone the line. \
t wthenrl wim reprcN?4nted by G.
K. Pollock.
RIOTERS ARE 6N ?
TRIAL FOR flFE
LAKE (IIARIES, Li_Special.
\ruuil deputies |Kiir?>le?il tin
streets here, when Uie trial
ol iilty-t\\M m??mln'rs of lb?*
l'.iolhei boo?I of Timber Work??r>.
rlsargesl wliii morder in <?onn?o
tion with fatal rioting durftsig tin
labor troubles last July, Ih-j-uu in
the IM-trict Court.
\ Isolidai was ?i?-< -tared through
oat tin- stale f?>r today, ami tin?
re pr?sent?t! ves of unt?os came
lier?.-. Tbc '-?l?*r?'iis?- ? - ciiiiiitlt e"
???ut oui Invitations **to coae t?i
iak?? ?*tiarge and alma that osr
gassixed iai??>r ? ?. against meaTda**e.*'
Two hundred witnesses, Inctnd?
ing inteen Burns ?l? u-?-ti\?->. were
?>n liand ut tin* opening of court.
l'i\?- men were kill?-?l in a light
between union ami aoa-unton
lumber ?nrkrrs at th<> Galloway
i imbcr Company's laant on July
17th:
III sl?,\M? NO. ?? \\ \\ l ?
? \*?U FROM HER ><>? t
NEW YORK E -Suit for flO.
? ali?n?t i
was Tuesday against John J.
kcal pruducei who on
s. i ? 9th married ' ?thy
h in Stamford, * '<::n.
\\ inach, h.-r former hus?
limitr m the suit. Complaint
In the Supreme Court
Wins, h haa als.'
for an annulment of the divorce grant?
ed to Mi a Wins? h t hei pril.
it is said by his attorney, B
: Street.
Wlnsch says he married Mrs.
In Philadelphia in November, 1910,
and thej maintained a home In At?
lantic City. When he was away on
business In November and December,
1 9 1 1. and January ami February,
1912, the husband asserts. Collins was
a frequeat ?aller ?>n Mrs. Wlnsch.
? bruary. 11*1 -'. th<
ant has detained and harbored
plaintiffs wife sgainst the consent of
the plaintiff and In opposition t-> his
most pesceabls efforts to obtain in r."
the complaint continues, Wlnsch add
that his wile's suit for divorce v.as
uht on the advice of Collins,
who took her to Chicago in March
or April.
"I thought Collins was my fi
sai?! Wlnsch. * I Introduced my wife
to him and never dream? d he would
turn her against me. When i win
my action for annulment of the dl
her for
bigamy."
"it is not true that Wlnsch Intro?
duced me to my presen!
Collins in his office in the Cohan
Theater building. "1 never knew lira
.1 until last January, and I met
her her?- in N"?\\ fork and not by
Wlnsch's introduction, i ? In?
strumental In th on, nor
did 1 take her to Chlcaj?o. She sepa
d from Wlnsch last i ? be
?he ?\?r met
Benton McMIUln, former Gov? mor
? . was an uncle of Mrs.
Collins. Shi? has been thrice married,
being the widow of Fred U. Regel, of
St. Louis, when Wlnsch married her
two yeai Collins is president
of the Fred C. Whitney Produi h g
Company. "When marri. ??I in Stam?
ford, Conn- he gave his au<- as twen?
ty-eight. His bride said she was thir?
ty-five.
THOMAS J. RYAN
TAKES OWN LIFE
Democratic Leader in Pennsylva?
nia Faces Death Rather
Than Meet Poverty.
PHILADELPHIA. PA.? Special.?
Themas J. Ryan, Democratic leader
ci Pennsylvania, member of the Don
nelly-Ryan-Guffey triumvirate that
for so long controlled the organisa?
tion of thwt party in this State, ended
his life late Sunday afternoon in his
office in the Land Title and Trust
building by shooting himself with a
revolver. Tin- examination of the
pistol shows that the lirst cartridge
?Ji?i not explode ami the second bail
was the one that lodged in hi? brain.
Ryan was hopelessly Involved
financially, and from a man of great
wealth it is understood that he had,
through unfortunate investments, be?
come practically pennllesa He was
Interested in Dreamland at Coney
Island, .V V., and lost a large fortune
when the amusement park burned
down two rears age. This season he
built another amusement resort on the
sit?- of the Old 1'oint Breeze race
track lu-r?-, but it has not been a sue
CSSB, and there was a meeting sched
uled for his office today, where his
creditors were to gather and devise
plans for a trusteeship.
Several years ago, after he had
amassed a snug fortune, Ryan began
to invest in local traction securities.
He was Intimate with the Widenera,
and the late QeorgS L>. "Widener gave
him the concessions at all of the parks
on the lines of the Philadelphia Rapid
Transit C?>mpany. In many of his
\ entures he was aided financially by
the Wideiiers and Jam?*? J. Guffey.
GREEKS RALLY TO
COUNTRY'S CALL
RICHMOND, VA.?Special.?
Voting unanimously to accept the
royal decree from Athens calling on all
loyal ?Ureeks over here in America to
return to ?Jreece to rally to the de?
fense of their nativ?? country, over 250
members of the local (Jreek colony met
Saturday night at Sparks' Hall, 719
teast liroad ?Street, under the auspices
of the Pun-Hellenic Union. George
GlanalOS piesided as chuirman. Many
chei ?>f Intense patriotism to their
fatherland were made by Ur--:ks
prominent In the local colony her?
The spirit of the evening was % ^,
fested in the following words by "one
o? the Greeks who spoke:
"\\ ?? do not give up our citizenship,"
lie said. "We have adopted thLs ?coun?
try for good, and when th?- trouble is
over we will come back. If we go
abroad t<> fight the battles <-f Or?
It will not be tor King ?.?eorge, but
for our lathers and mothers and loved
ones They are still in the old ?oun
try and we must protect them from the
Turk."
Woman Worship in the North.
James Oliver CurWOOd, author of
"The Flower of the North," tells the
following story about the men to be
found In the country about Hudson
Bay, where the scene of his story is!
laid: "1 was at Prince Albert,'* he
says, "sitting on the veranda of the
little old Windsor Hotel, facing the
Saskatchewan. During the fow days
tous a number of factors, tran?
sad hall-l.reed eanoemen had
corns down from the north. One of
these men had not been down to the
of civilization for seven years.
Three of the others had not been
down in two, and this was the annual
trip of the other ?-ight?for there WOTS
just eighteen of us sitting there to?
gether. We were smoking and talk?
ing when a young woman turned up
the narrow walk leading to the ve?
randa. Immediately every voice was
hushed, and as the woman came up
the steps those twelve roughly clad
m? n of the wilderness rose to their
feet to a man, each holding his cap
in his hand. Thus they stood silent
and with bowed heads, until the young
woman had passed into the hotel. It
was the most beautiful tribute to wo?
manhood I had ever seen. And I, the
man from civilization, was the only
one who remained sitting, with my
hat still on my head!"
%tmt9
Lender of Tammany Hall and a power
in the New York State Democracy,
whoso suggestion that Governor Dix
ho ranominatod met with such a storm
of protest that he now seems to he
in a quandary as to who his choice
for Governor will be.
TAET ON TOUR
INTO VERMONT
President Will Visit the Birth?
place of His Father at
Townsend.
DALrTOK, MASS_Special.?
President Taft left Senator
Crane's home here Monday and re?
sumed tai? automobile t?>ur. creas?
ing Un- Iin?- Into Vermont.
The l*Tesi?h*nt, who is accom?
panied by Mrs. Taft anil Mi-?.
Mabel Boardman, planned to
have luncheon at Brattlehoro ami
slop at Manchester for dinner. On
his waj ib?- President will ?????it
the birthplace of his father el
Townscnd, \'t.
In Manchester the imrty will
I??* the gaests overnight of Robert
la, Lim-ofTi, son of the martyred
l"T??si?l?-nt.
Goreri?or-elect -letchot ami
other Republlcaa l?-a?i??rs <>f 111??
Siale probably will iu??et the
President.
rO>STA>TI>OPLE,? Sperla.1
That the effsarts of tin* powers
have proved su? ??*ssful ami that
a war between Tarkey and tin?
Balkan league Is now improbable
?vas the view eanareased today by
leading diplomats, who. as Repre?
sentatives of their government*??,
have b-iit ih< ii iiiiiiu-M??' toward
peace.
It i*. asserted that the Bghllllg
now going on in iii?> Balkans will
have mi effect <>u ilu- general sit?
uation, but ?an he attributed to
tin? aareat thai has nrcirallnd there
for many ?ears.
BRITAIN READY.
LONDON. Special_Great Britain
stand- ready to join with Use
gr?-at European powers to ?-o?-r??>
Turkey ami the Balkan States
luto peace.
l\iil<iwhiir a long conference at
the foreign office today, at which
Sir Edward <.r*cy. the British for?
eign minister, presided. il was
learned from an authoritative
source that England had accept?
ed, with modilications, the RaSBO
French proposal to ?l?-ai sKinlj
with Turkey, Bulgaria, Staprla,
Mon?*u*?jro ?ml Give??-. How ?".er,
ibis ?loes not preciada a dcclaru
tion of war.
Th?* Balkan Stat??s and Gre?-??
nrr air? ad.v on a war footing ami
fighting bas b?*?*ii In prognes*
along the Turkish ami Greek
frontiers for aearly a week.
SHA UP BATTLE IKiUGIfT.
SALONIKA. EUROPEAN Tilt
KEY. Special.?A sharp battle was
fought unlay beCweesS Bulgarian
troops, who crossed the frontier
Into the V??ly Rey district, and
Turkish soldiers.
The Bulgarians seized several
unoccupied Turkish blockhouse,
and began putting them into
shape to withstand a siege when
the Turkish troops came up.
Wh??n the strength of the Bul?
garians was seen additional Turk?
ish sohlten w?-r?? s?>nt to the front.
The can-let was still raging this
afternoon.
COKRESI'ONDENTS GATHER.
SOPi.., BULO A RI A.? Special*?
War cos respondents gatlierc<l In
this ?ity in <-x|>e<-taiioii of-hostili?
ties in th?* Balkans were notifie?!
toduy by tb<* geaeral stair of the
Bulgarian army to prepare within
the next few ?lays I o join th?;
liead?|iiarters* staff leaving Solia.
MARKET DEPRESSED.
PARIS. Special.?War possibili?
ties in the Balkans again depress
?*<I the pon?aos Of Paris, Vienna
and Berlin today.
However, the tension In the
financial districts of Ian-ope was
MOO t?'ii?H* ami the outlook was
regarded with more optimism,
despite dispatches tolling of light?
ing. Money remains easy for
loans.
Answer, Yes.
When a New York reporter asked
John I). Rockefeller If it were true
that he was <?nly worth $900,000,000,
Mr. Rockefeller smiled and parrietl
the ouest ion in his usual way.
economical, young man," bo
said. '"Work and save. Then you'U
be richer some day than I am, maybe.
"Prosperity," Mr. Rocekfeller con?
tinued "prosperity Is said to have
ruined many a man. I
PASSENGER AND FREIGHT
TRAINS HAVE fOlJ-ttJlON
HAOERSTOWfN, MD.? Special)? A
disastrous collision between a ?'hila
delphls and Reading passeager jtraln
and a freight train on the Wdstern
Maryland Railroad, occurred nearj here
today.
The flrsl report to the railroal offi?
cials says that eicht j.. rsons havdbeen
killed and many Injured.
At tho Country l'ostofac
"Mornin', John."
"Months', Mister I^essler."
"How be you 7"
"Spry, thank y'. Hafcrn
ness bin in this mornin'V
?V?>p."
"r.it any mail?"
"Vep."
"What kind?"
"Pustal."
"What did It say?"?F'
When tho People^
?t.ft
--" ? mai- - ? ?!?? ? saaaai i as asn
Fl^Rr^cWs7sow
BY "SDN" DEAD FOR 44 YEARS
NEW YORK. Special.? The veil of
BsyateO Which has Shrouded the dis?
appearance o? Teresa ? u.?k?o?) Slck
lea, the Brat wife of General Daniel
K. Blckli s, was raised Wednesday by
Mrs. Anna Nail Mart in?/.. ?>f l'ra?l
hurst Avenue and v'ne Hundred and
Fifty-first Street
Mrs. Martines, seventy-five years of
was tin? girlhood chum of the
tirst Mrs. Sickles and probably knew
her more intimately than any of her
friends. Famous as a singer, she had
com? to America iti I860, where she
soon became prima donna Of the Ole
Bull Concert Company, at that time
th?' most note,i musieai organisation
in this country. Antonio Bagioli, lica?l
of an Italian opera ?company and
father of Teresa, had preceded Mrs.
Martin?-/, here, so it was not unusuai
that the young women should meat.
The story Mrs. Martinez tells is
particular Interest In view of tho be?
lief of Alfr.d Summers MolynoUX,
who thinks he has proof ht? is the
sou of the tirst Mrs. Sickles. Mr.
Molyneux, when ? baby, was found 111
a carpet bag aboard*a train at South
Atmboy, N. .?., s few months before
Sickles, then a isman from
New York, killed Philip Barton K
and Mr. Molyneux was iat?-r t?>i?i by
the nurse who cared for him she had
?n tt? believe Mrs. Sickles was his
mother.
Sought Mother for 27 Y<
Por tw< years after re
C*eivlng th.s information Mr. Moly
neiiN 1ms mother anil last Week
advertised t<> learn whether she was
dead or alive.
When a reporter found Mrs. Mar?
tinez, th?- former prima donna said
she would willingly give such infor?
mation as si: ed.
"Mrs. Sickles died when she was
thirty-one years eld," said Mrs. Mar?
tinez, 'and to the best of my knowl?
edge all other members of her fam?
ily have passed away, unless It bo a
brother ?if Mrs. Sickles. I am cer
taln of Mrs. Sickles' death, for T Bang
at her funeral i also acted as her
bridesmaid. When her father. An?
tonio, died T sang at his funeral."
Mrs. .Martinez Bald Mrs. Sickles,
who, as she breathed her last at the
CLARK CHANGES
PLEA TO GUILTY
INDIANAPOLIS, IND_Special.
Edward Clark, rormcr business
manager ?>l tin Iron-Workers'
I nion at Cincinnati, changed Id?*
plea from not guilty to guilty at
the ?liM'iiiug ??f th?- i??i?'rai dyna?
mite ?conspiracy trial today.
It Ma?- prc?li?'l?'<l that others
??f th?' d?ef?endants wonld follow
(lark's example ami that many
of the forty-six defendants left
would join a stampede t?? throw
tlu*ms?'l\?'s tt|?oii tin* mercy of
the ooart.
MAY DROP CHARGES
AGAINST KIDD
RICH MOM), VA., Special_
lu ?>r?l?*r to prt'M'iit AtUirmy
LOttts O. Wendciihiii-g from get?
ting hohl of whites*-?-?- in the fa
mons Leo hidd iiiiinorulit y al?
legations and hurting Hie prose
< ulioii? ease in the pending llrii
ri?'i? county charges against the
pickle iiuinuiact tiler's son, it i
nol Improbable that the charge
against Kitltl. scheduled for to?
morrow in Justice CrtitohticUl's
?*??urt. will Ik* nolle prossetl.
That this woniti be the oat
???inie of tin* city case, whtcfa lia
Ih-?-ii hanging lire lor several
weeks, was kralted about in i\>
lie?* Court this morning. The
probability of this move l?i check?
mate the defense and prneerve
th?* prosecution's case la the
county is considered ti??' inore ni4
parant la view of the lad that
tin* nroaecutlon ?i?m's not bclievo
that it will be aale to conrict
Kiihl of th?- charges schedtdtod t??
Ik* aired in Polloe Court tomor?
row. The principal Witness
against Ki?l?l?n girl whom he is
all?*g???l tO have \\ rouge?!?will
testify, tin' indue Bay, thut relu
tions between herself ami liiiltl
Were not Improper.
Commonwealth W 11 n ??*???? s
against Ki?l?l in th?* charges dock
?'t?*?l in Judg?* Scott's court in
the county are <i?'i?'n*-?> wltaeatea
in Use ?ity psaa? As tneee wit?
nesses?three young girls??ere
summoned in the city ?-as?* by Mr.
Wcnricnburg, eoim?el f?ir hidd.
the pr?iseeution in the county
??ases Ls powerless to prevent the
attorney from siib??oeiiu<liig and
talking with them. If this hap?
pens, the county prosecution ar?
gues, its ease will In* weakened.
The city ease against Kidd was
set for Saturday, but went over
of necessity until tomorrow bc
eause witnesses subpoenaed by
Mr. Wenden burg were not per?
mitted?at the alleged instance
of Henri???! Commonwealth's At?
torney iYank Button?to appear.
Mr. Wenden burg resented what
he ternsed Mr. ?Sutton's unwar?
ranted and unprecedented inter
ferenee ami ha?l SOUSe pertinent
things to say anent it
RURALITE VICTIM
OF SHREWD CROOK
RICHMOND, VA.?Special.?
c. it. iiurton. forty-two years old,
who giv? s his occupation as machin?
ist and his address sa Roanote, was
arrested this morning ami lodged in
First Police Station, charged With ob?
taining, under false pretenses, $2 be?
longing to Henry Johnson, a visitor
at tin- State Pair.
Burton, who is believed to be ?
professional carnival and lair ?-rook,
was caught red-handed In the Capitol
Square this morning by Detective
Charles W. Atkinson.
When taken Into custody, i.urton
was attempting to procure money
from another ruralite, according to
the poli;e, by unfolding his BCh?
which, it is said, was a proposition to
furnish lucrative employment with
the American Locomotive Works, for
which, as agent Of the corporation, he
secured ? fee, a consideration which,
by tlu* way, was "spot" cash.
Johnson, an early arrival, it :ip
peara, fell a victim to the sharper last
week. After being assured that ? po?
sition would be given him when he
applied at the locomotive plant, the
stranger 1 > i ? 1 him adieu.
Johnson was told at the shops that
Burton, nor anyone ?-l.se, for t lia t mat?
ter, was authorised to act as employ?
ment agent n?- was further tuhi that
he had been duped.
Burton's \i<tim has been looking
i ami low for the smooth-tongued
Individual. This morning his search
was rewarded with succesa As he
sed through the square, h?i ?spied
Burton eeated on a park besah, in
tion with a com?
panion.
Johnson rushed breathlessly into
police headtiuarters and ? \. itedly ex?
claimed:
"I've f?iund the follow that fiim
fiammed me."
He was asked to explain. He did.
"He's out yonder in the grove," he
added.
Of thirty-one, must have died In
was burled from St. Joseph's
Church, Washington Place ami Sixth
?venue. Interment was in Groan
wood Cemet? Martines
uist Of the church and his
wife the sob
Six-m I_ist Years in Seclusion.
"Mrs. Sickles wan living in SSClO
rdoa at One Hundred and Eighteenth
street and North River at the Urns
of her death.-' said Mrs. Martin?-/..
'That was in th.* country in those
days so far out. In fact, that i slid
not have a chance to sas hor before
the end came. Her father ?ii?-?i som?
- later. Hi- was buried from SI.
Joseph and Interred In Gi'een'wood.
Mrs. Bagioll died ?.iubt j > at
Crot?n l'a ils. Where she was lnt< rred
1 do n?>t know.
"So far as i ever knew the Sickles
had but One Child. This was I.aura,
who. While young, eloped with S man
named Carleton. I think lu- was an
Englishman. About ?imht <>r ten
years ago Mrs .t'arleton ?he?! in Brook?
lyn while sin- was residing with her
uncle, George ?'o..k. If Mr. Cook Is
alive he h? the last of th?' family.
Thinks sin* Would lla\<- Told Her.
"I was so Intimate with Mrs.
silkies." said Mrs. Martines; "that it
seema almost Impossible thai If s son
wen- horn to her she would not have
confided in ?ne. Moreover, l saw her
every little while, wv were firm
friends ir?>m the time l cam?- to
America until her death. T have
it published that Mrs. Sickles was di?
vorced. This is not so. Had til? t>?
a divorce General sickles would
hardly have placed ? shaft over her
grave, which he did."
According to Mrs. Martines the
Slckles-Bagloll wedding, the society
event Of the season, occurred at the
Bagioll home. f.L' Prince Street. Later
the Bagiolls ii\?-<! st Fifteenth
Str?-?-t an?! on East Thirty-second
Street, still later they moved "into
tile country" at One Hundred and
teenth Street and North River.
For y?-ara they maintained a country
home at Hastings.
While th?> Bagiolls were at on?* time
wealthy they died poor.
Detective Atkinson was detailed to
itnpany the complainant, who in?
sisted in first swearing pul s warrant
for Burton. The latter was surprised
and was a prisoner before he knew it.
Johnson will appear against him In
Police Court tomorrow morning.
Search by Jail Warden Confirms
Hrcum That Jasper Allen Tarried
Ro? oh or.
ROAMlKK, Y A.? Special_Jas
ROANOKE, V V. <>?i. 7.?.In?
?x-r Allen, brotlu-r of l'loy?l nuil
sblna Allen, came to Roaaoke
last night. ssTompanlrd by Vi?-u?r
Allen, son <?r Floyd ABen, to ?r
range for counsel for Sklna Allen.
This nmmlng Jasper \n<-n aras
arrested at the Jail iio??r by Jalhe
W. C, All?-n anil locked up OB flu?
??imrg?? ?>f carrying s pistol, which
be denied having until in? was
s?-ar?-b?-?l by Hi?* jailer ami his n?
sistaat. H?* had been in tin? jail
last nlglil. but was not s?*ar?-li??d.
?laib-r Alton, during tin? night.
could nut si???'|) well and dreamed
In* M*ar?-ln*?l .lasjn-r Alton ami
found a gun on him. He tlroain<*<!
1Im* MU?e thing s?*v?-ral lime? ami
this moralag r?-p<>rt?*<i the nmtter
l?i .Iinlg?? Slii,|ib-s. who ??initxl
him t<> ssaarch th?* visitors when
they cante ba?-k i?> ?.??<> their kin*.
inan this looming.
Ai 10:34 o'clock when .Ta-ix-r
ami V4ctor Alhn arrived at tin
jail ami requested admittance.
Jailer AUen Infotined ib?-in thai
they would lia*e to be s-nrchnl
f?>r w?-a|M>us. Both submitted,
though .lack Mien had protested
(hat he luid no pistol.
When his breas) coat posgfcet
was reached lu- linefeed and grub?
bed bis pocket, but th?- jailers
were to?> quick for, him. They
covered him with their -runs ami
a .:.s-?alib?-r Smith ?v Wesson was
found concealed in a leather ami
tot In his br?-as| po? kit. Allen
claims that Ik? is a constable, ami
as such a ceases? ator of tin*
peace, which gi*.?-s him a right
under the Slate law to carry a
gun.
Altea was later ar??ai_n?-<l be
for?- aTasttoe B?-rk?-ly for ?arrying
conreatod iveapoas, and hi- case
contlnned until aexl flalaidsj to
give him an opportunity to s*M-ur?*
a ?-ourt ? <?rtlli?at??. showing that
b?? is a State officer, ii?* was insII
?*<i in the sum of $ioo, with At?
torney it. ii. Willis as satiety.
Jiisib-?* Berkley i*emtered an
?ipinioii to th?? awect that he Im*
Itoves Allen has a right to oaiTy a
pistol, but Stated that lu* did not
<l??sir?? t<? try the caae, as he him
self is ander indictment in Bed?
ford county on a <*on?-eale<I
weapon ?"barge, and, as a cons?'
queue?*. pr??feTM that BOase otlM?r
justbt? sit in tho ?-a.se.
Allen will leave for his homo
In Curroll this afternoon.
WAR AGAINST
VICE CONTINUES
Chicago Police Make Many Ar?
rests?These Included Several
Innocent Parties.
CHICAGO, ILL.? Special. Har?
rison B. Riley, millionaire head
of tin? Chicago Title and Trust
Company, will Ix* arraigned in
court unlay, at lb?* same tiim*
Hint officers with warrant?, ami
capiases are searching for ftfty
iwo other owners of property, al?
leged io bans been aaed f?>r im?
moral parpoaes.
This was bat one Step in tho
vice war b?"lng waged ? >>" Mate's
Attorney Wayman. Mor?? than
1,000 women, residents of tin* r<?
stricted district, planned a parad??
today to end at VYayiiian's office.
There tin? women were to ?I?*
maml bonus tvlm-li have is-?u de?
nied tin-in by the hotels, som?* by
Wayman's oiders, others iM*?au><*
th?') refase t?i ?'iitertain this class
?>f women.
So vigilant hare been th<* de
tectlres in sean hing for disorder?
ly resorts that several mar lied
couples have b?-en arrested and
subjected to abus?-.
On Attorney Way man's orders
a patrol wagon is kept in th?? dis?
trict ready t?i mak<- a last run
in ?-ase any arrests are sonde. Af?
ter the cases against th?- ow n?-rs
are ctoncinded State's Attorney
Wayman Intends to go after tin?
k?-?*|H-rs. In- said.
What ?a all this we hear about the
on's oysters being Infected with
typhoid germs? Are ire to be denied
the most tempting cold weather dish
known? We just believe these gorm
theorists are stark crazy (in their pet
Subject and propose to eat all the oys?
ters w. can pay for, or have any one
else to treat us to.? 1'.lackstom- Cou?
rier.
Roosevelt's appeal for support in
the South on the ground that h
half n Southerner proved Ineffective.
Woodrow Wilson is a whole South?
erner, born a Democrat on Southern
soil. ST here and has
always been claimed by the Southern
| people as a son of the South.?Peters?
burg Progress.

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