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Tazewell Republican. (Tazewell, Va.) 1892-1919, October 10, 1912, Image 2

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i azewcll Republican.
PUBLISHED RVEKY ritUKSDAY AT
TAZKWELL, V1KGINIA,
? Bv?
W t,. i,'MKIEN.
Editor and Proprietor.
SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Republican, one year, in advance $1.00
Advertising Rates furnished on ap?
plication. Correspondence solicited.
The publish, r of The I?epiblican is
not responsible for opinions express? d
by CJonespondent*.
The Republican is enter-d at the
Postoffice at Taxewell. Virginia, as s??c
ond-class matter.
All p-r??>ns who take the paper from
tho posU>th>e or rural del-very box?*s
will be expected to pay for same. If
you do not de?eire the pap r you will
kindly notify us, or tell the postmaster
or rural carriers to Bead notice to dis?
continue.
Tazewell Republican.
THURSDAY. OCTOBER 10, 1912.
THE PURITY OF ELECTIONS.
General Ayers, the democratic candi?
date for Congress, is posing as the ad?
vocate of a pure ballot and pure elec?
tion!?. He seems to have deluded him
s?lf into the false belief that a pure bal
- lit and h?ines* electiens can be secured
by simply discontinuing the use of
m >~ey. ? KCept f r lef-irimste campaign
purposes. H" fails to recognize, or re?
fuses to acknowledge the f??ct, that th?
purity of elections is more dependent
on honest election laws than on honest
dollars. He does not appear to see that
the corruption of the electorate is more
clearly the outgrowth of the dishonest
election law i of Virginia than tie pro?
duct of corrup'i >iiipts who handle the
corruption funds of the moneyed inter?
ests for the benefit of some particular
pirty or candidate.
General Ay.-rs i-? reluctant to admit
that the poll tex ciiahficntion for voting,
which he helped place in the new eon
atitution, has done more to make the
voters venal than any other thing that
has been known in the politics of our
state. I'ut in a card, addressed to the
voters of the district shortly after his
nomination for Congress, he uninten?
tionally admitted the corrupting influ?
ence of the poll tax qualification, when
he said:
"Ido rot want the support of
men who have to be bribed to give
it. * * ? I, therefore, appeal to
every voter in the district who has
not paid his poll tax and qualified
hineelf to v? te to do so at one?.?
pay i' \o:irself?pay it with your
own mi.n ?> ; ?qualify y-iurself to ex
the PRIVILEGE of an Amer?
ican .'it ;z< n without wearing any
man'.* collar. Permit no man to
pay whvn you come in vote: 'I paid
your p ii tax end you must vote for
my man.' t ut come t<^ the polls und
vote independently."
Is this no' an admissu.n that the poll
tax qoalification for voting is an inex?
haustible source of corruption? The
Congr? 3-ional campaign of two years
a^o, p< rhapa, had aroused the attention
of Gen? ral A/ens?it being an undeni?
able fact that a movem-nt for the col
leition of a poll tax fund was originated
at his home town by one of his man?
agers in this campaign; tnd that the
fund raised was sufficiently large to pay
the pol! taxes of eight thousand delin?
quents, wiio were expected to vote for
"rr.y man'?Stuart. Cannot the demo?
cratic candidate see that he and his
democratic associate? in the constitu?
tional convention have degraded the
sacred rijrht of suffrage that attaches
to every American citizen into a cheap
privilege? General Ayers says to the
voter: "Qualify yourself to exercise
the PRIVILEGE of an American citi?
zen," by payment to the Commonwealth
of one dollar and a half for each of the
three years next preceding the election
at which you offer to vote Can it be
denied that the constitution of Virginia
bas degraded suffrage into a commod?
ity? Having so degraded the elective
franchise and having debauched eight
thousand men by paying their poll taxes
for them two years ago, is it not cruel
for the dem?crata to be now prosecu?
ting and persecuting the poor voters
who dared to sell the privilege whievi
they bad bought themselves or that had
been purchased for them by political
corruptionist8?
While the poll tax qualification for
voting is the fountain-head of the cor?
rupt ballot in Virginia, there are many
other polluting arteries that come into
the stream along which the voter has to
travel as he journeys to the balllot box.
These corrupting arteries or feeders
are the registration and el. ction laws
which General Ayers assisted in framing
and putting in the constitution.
Is General Ayers really and truly for
a pure ballot? We would dislike to be?
lieve he is not. But if he is, why rest :
upon his idea that they can be secured j
by using money only legitimately; and
without granting the request of Mr.
niSssTi|i and the republicans to have the
present dishonest election laws reform?
ed? Surely he should favor a fair ad?
ministration of these unfair laws, if he
wishes the coming election to be clean
and honest. Why has he not reeiuested
the circuit court judges to appoint a re?
publican member on the electoral board
of each county in the district? These
boards are now, ard have been ever
since the new constitution went into
effect, composed entirely of partisan
democrats. Why has not the General
nrged that the electoral boards of the
several counties of the district permit
the republicans to name their own elec
tion officers and select one of the clerks
of election for each precinct? Mr. Stu?
art on the Moor of the constitutional
convention asserted that the only way
to absolutely assure an honest election
was to give the minority party one of
the clerks at each precinct.
Now, General, if you wish to prove
that you are earnestly for a pure ballot
and honest elections, do not stop with
s ?y half-way remedy, but travel tbe
whole distance. Cease to treat suffrage
as a privilege or license, and hold it up
as a right, as declared in our priceless
Bill of Rights. Do not longer cling to
the unfair election laws you helped to
write in the constitution, which laws,
even one of your most ardent newspa?
pers supporters (the Lynchburg News)
avows afford facilities for administering
"a dose of vote stealing that is vote
stealing?a sort that would mean some?
thing?a sort that would retire Mr.
Slemp to private life and keep him
there. ' '
WILSON AND THE BOSSES
Doctor Wilson, the democratic candi?
date for President, has been trying to
win popular favor by refusing to accept
tainted money or the assistance of cor?
rupt political bosses foi furtbering his
interests in the campaign. The first
act of the Wilson farce was performed
in New York with Governor Wilson,
Colonel Hare*eey and Colon? 1 W atterson
as the star actors. 1 his was at the be
ginning of the Wdson campaign for the
nomination for President, when the
Govern??- succeeded in attracting public
attention through his dramatic refusal
to accept the tainted money of Thomas
F. Ryan for use in his campaign.
The second act was witnessed in the
Baltimore convention, when Mr. Bryan
demanejed the expulsion of Thomas For?
tune Ryan from the Virginia delega?
tion, and defiantly violated the instruc?
tions given him by the people of his own
state by turning from Champ Clark to
Woodrow Wiiaon, becjuse Boss Murphy
and hij pocket delegation from New
York were supporting Clark.
The third act was put upon the stage
at Syracuse, N. Y., the principal actors
being Gjvern >r Wilson, Govern<>r Dix
and Charles Murphy, the Tammany
boss. This was a very ridiculous act, in
which Governor Wilson affected to por?
tray his horror at being associated so?
cially or politically with the machine
leaders and state officeholders of New
York, Tammany Leader Murphy, John
H. McCooey, Murphy's deputy in Brook?
lyn; Norman E. Mack, Governor Dix,
Lieutenant Governor Conway and their
friends and followers. The newspaper
reports state that Governor Wilson
was "rrade very uncomfortable" by be?
ing forced to sit at the same table with
Murphy's gang at luncheon; and that
be ate none of the lunch except a little
"bread and better," leaving the table
with the excuse that he "wanted to see
a trotting race " The newspaper ac?
counts also said that when a photogra?
pher got Governor Wilson to pose for a
picture, and Wilson found that Murphy,
Dix and McCkwey bad fallen in along?
side of him he ducked his head and
ran away like a scared chicken runs and
hides from a hawk that is threatening
to pounce on it.
But it appears that Governor Wilson
is now getting rid of his aversion to cor?
rupt hosties and distaste for partaking
of their hospitality The fourth act in
the Wilson comedy took place at Indian?
apolis last week. Following is a part
of the press account of the occasion:
"Indianapolis accorded the candi?
date an enthusiastic welcome. He
was met at the station shortly after
noon by committees from the con?
servation congress, the University
club and the local democracy, head?
ed by "Tom" Taggart. Unlike
Tammany leader, Murphy, however,
Mr. Taggart did not attempt to
thrust his attentions on the candi?
date. He contented himself with
supplying automobiles, lunch and
other necessitiea for the candidr te
and his party, while he himself took
a position in the far back grpund.
The Governor was hardly aware
that Mr. Taggart was in the vicin?
ity, or that the Indianapolis leader
wes the general master of ceremo?
nies of the day. It was Mr. Tag
ezart and his friends, however, who
arranged the monster mass meeting
at the baseball park in the evening,
at which Governor Wilson address?
ed about ten thousand wildly enthu- I
siastic citizens."
Governor Wilson ia claiming to be a '
progressive democrat. He ia certainly '
a progressive politician; and he baa pro
: grees?*d so far that be can manifest
j hoiror when brought in social and po?
ll ical contact m it h the corrupt bosses
lof New York state, and express disgust
, when t? ndereil the tainted money of
Thomas K. Ryan, a Wall street mag?
nate, lie has progress? d in the art ao
far that he can go to Indianapolis, ait
down at a lunch supplied by "Tom"
Taggart, who "was general master of
the ceremonies of the day." They say
[ that "Tom" took a position far in the
back ??round, but he headed the local
democracy that mot the thy old D c or
at the station He furnished the uuto
mobiles, the lunch and the other n> ces
sities for the candidat?*. Bjt "Tom"
"kept in the back ground." they say
Was this a prearrangement?
Now, what is the difference between
Charles Murphy, the Tammany boss,
and "Tom" Taggart, the Indiana boss'
Ciarles Vurphy has become notorioui
and rich by levying toll or tribute 01
the gambling hells and other vices o
New York city, while "Tom" Taggar
has become notorious and immense!;
wealthy by the operation of his owi
gambling hell at French Lick Springs
Indiana, ?the Monte Carlo of America
What is the difference between Gov
ernor Dix, of New York, and Governo
Marshall, of Indiana? Dix is Murphy'
governor, because Murphy made hit
governor; and that is why Wilson an
his friends insisted that Dix should nc
be renominated last week by the Net
York democrats.
Marshall is Taggart's governor. Tag
gart named him as Wilson's runnin
mate at the Baltimore convention; ar
was one of the silent forces that brougl
about the movement to shelve Cham
Clark and nominate Wocdrow Wilsoi
These were good and sufficient reasoi
for Governor Wilson to racceept the tain
ed association of "Tom'' Taggart.
They say, "the Governor was haid
aware that Mr. Taggart was in the e
cinity." Perhaps he wo<-e a speci
pair of gh.ssi? that tran.ifoimed Ton
stripe?! clothing int > regular ministen
garb. But how could bis nostril-, th
are so acutely tuned to gather th?? od
of tainted money and tainted t...ss<
escape the French Lick smell of t
gasoline used in Tom Taggart's au
mobile? And how could his refined a
delicate palate fail to rt*cognize 1
French Lick flavor of the dainty viar
of which be partook so graciously
Tom Taggart's luncheon?
Truly, Governor Wilson has become
progressive that he can shape his mo
and political scruples to suit the rr
and the occasion.
If there is any one thing more it
another that wib make the R mst-v
men in the Ninth district more resol
in their purpose to solidly bupport It
com Slemp for Congress, it ia the v
shallow trickery of the Rotmoke Tin
and the Lynchburg News to show th
how they should act and vote The
punlic r:s of this district, whether r
for Roosevelt or Taft, have long si
learned that when these papers t;
political virtue for their text that ti
are only seeking to indoctrinate th
to whom they are preaching with pu
ical vice. Mr. Slemp will profit by
efforts of the Times and News to di
the support of the Roosevelt men a?j
from him. The Roosevelt people no
nated Slemp at Bristol, and they *
keep the faith and elect him at the p
in November.
-?#?#>
Nothing sets so wide a mark betw
a vulgar and noble soul as respect
and reverential love of womankind,
man who is always sneering at wot
is morally low and coarse.
Saved By His Wife.
She's a wise woman who knows
what to do when her husband's life i
danger, but Mrs. R. J. Flint, of Br
tree, Vt , is of that kind. "She insii
on my using Dr. King's New Discover
writes Mr. Flint, "fora dreadful cot
when I was so weak my friends
thought I had only a short time to I
and it completely cured me. " A q
cure for coughs and colds, it's the n
safe and reliable for many throat
lung troubles?grip, bronchitis, cr?
whooping cough, quinsy, tonsilitis, Il
or rages. A trial will convince ;
50 cents and $1 00. Guaranteed by
dealers.
Advert isemer
VIRGINIA?In the Clerk's Office of
? the Circuit Court of the County of
Tazewell on the 3rd day of October,
1912:
Ollie A. Brewer, Plaintiff,
Against j In Chancery.
Charles Brewer, Defendant
The object of thi. suit is to obtain a
divorce a vinculo matrimoni from the
defendant, and an affidavit having been
made and filed that Charles Brewer is
not resident of the state of Virginia, it
is ordered that he do appear here with?
in fifteen days after due publication
hereof, and do what may be necessary
to protect his interest in this suit. And
it is further ordered thst a copy hereof
be published once a week for four suc?
cessive weeks in the Tazewell Republi?
can, a newspaper published in the coun?
ty of Tazewell, and that a copy hereof
tie posted at the front door of the court
i house of this county in a manner pre?
scribed by law. and that a copy of this
order be sent by registered mail to the
defendant, Charles Brewer, to White
wood, Vs., his last known place of
abode.
A copy?Teste:
C. W. GREEVER, Clerk. ]
W. B. Spratt, p. q.
BUSINESS IS GOOD
- Broostrup la Sao Francisca? P-o?t
HARVEST OF THIS YEAR AND LAST
Estimated
WINTER WHEAT Sept., 1912
Bushels. 39/0,000,000
Acreage. 2 5,744.1000
SFRINt; WHEAT
Bushels. 300,000,000
Acreage. 19.201,000
TOTAL WHEAT
Bushels. 690,000,000
Acreage.
44,945,000
CORN
Bushels.2,995,000,000
Acreage
108,1 io,e>oo
OATS
Bushels. 1,290,000,000
. 37,844,000
Harvest
1911
430,656,000
29,162,000
190,882,OOO
26,381,000
621,338,000
49.543.000
?,531,487,000
105,825.000
922,298,000
37,763,000
Acreage.
POTATOES
Bushels. 398,000,000 292,737,000
Acreage. 3,689.000 3,619,000
TOBACCO
Pounds. .. 976,1000,90o 905,109,000
Acreage. 1,194,200 1,012,000
HAY
Tuns. 72,000,000 55,000,009
Acreage. 4?), 209,000 43,017,000
Good prices means good times. Do yoa wish the present prosper
ous times to continue? Then vote for Protection and Prosperity
The Mountain Fiend.
A Tale of Tug River.
BY H. A. COMPTON.
CHAPTER XII.
"I'm feelin'awful bad today, Jim,"
said Reuben, as two men made their
way down Tug towards Matewan. "I've
had a dull headache ever since I left
old HardinV, und jest feel like I'm tak
in the grip. "
"You moight be takin' fever," said
Jim, "er hit might be yaller janders,
fer yer eyes air lookin' a little bit yaller
ennyhow."
Onward they journeyed, Reuben con?
stantly complaining that he was grow?
ing worse. It was an hour past noon
when the two men reached the Ran?
dolph home?one tired and weary and
the other racked with pain.
Quickly a bed was prepared for the
sick man, but none thought that if
would be after long months of almos!
unendurable suffering that he agaii
would leave the bed.
Reuben slept soundly for severa
hours and it was hoped that when he
awoke he would be feelin? better, bul
not so All night through he tossed anc
rolled, constantly talking in t roken sen
fences of bis lost darling.
When morning came "Aunt Rinda'
waa sent for. She waa an herb docto
and almost tbe only source of medica
aid to be obtained. It was not long be
fore she arrived, bringing with her i
great bunch of herbs.
"He's got typhoid fever, sure, "sail
tbe good old woman, laying a wither?
hand on the flushed and burning fore
bead of the sick man, "and his fever ii
mighty high, too," she continued as sb
took a chair by the Are.
"Purty bad case, haint hit, Ann
Rinda?" inquired Jim.
"That it is." answered the old wo
man.
"An' what"?here Jim was inter?
rupted by the sufferer starting up from
a troubled sleep.
"I'm a comin', .Mary, I'm a coroin',
honey, ' he muttered. "I'll be thar
right 'way."
"I'll make him some boneset tea, "
said the old woman, when the sufferer
had again become quiet. "That's the
beat medicine in the world to break up
fever. ' '
Reuben was induced to drink great
quantities of the tea, but despite the
skill and nuraing of Aunt Rinda, be '
grew constantly worse, and for several
weeks he hovered between life and
death.
Christmas morning dawned clear and
beautiful The sun shone bright and
warm, but gradually hazy clouds began
to gather, and by evening the sky was
covered by a solid mass shifting rapidly
towards the east Presently soft, feath?
ery flakes began to fall, and in short
time snow to the depths of several
inches covered the earth.
All through the day drunken bands of
mountaineers had made their way into
the village, cursing, shouting and yell'
ing. All the occupants of Randolph's
cottage, save one, were much disturb?
ed. That one, the fever-stricken Reu?
ben, heeded not the noise of reckless
horde outside.
With the approach of darkness came
a raging wind, which blew and drifted
the snow about the house in great
mounds. How the wind whistled and
shrieked; how the hemlocks sighed and
moaned and the shutters and window?
of the Randolph home rattkd as thej
resisted the furious gale. But unmind
ful of all thi8 the unconscious moun
taineer peacefully and quietly lay wrap
ped in heavy blankets, with jugs of bol
water at his feet.
Morning dawnec cold and piercing,
and tiny particles of frost flew in the
air. Several days of intense cold foi
lowed, then the weather moderated
This was followed by another enov
deeper than the first, which cover?
the earth for many days.
One evening about the latter part o
February, Pete Randolph came in fron
the newly-establuhed postoffice with i
glad smile on bis face.
"I have some nrettv encouragiru
news," be said, taking a letter from his
pocket. "Mr. Moore has written me
something that will do Reuben (tond, I
j know, if he could only understand it.
1 He says that he has aeen an article in
I bis paper that giv? s without doubt the
1 whereabouts of Reuben's (sweetheart."
i Continuing, as he took the letter from
the envelope, "be says a Oatlettaburg
paper states that old Colonel Benson,
who is very rich end now in his last ill?
ness, has advertised for the parents of
Mary Baily, who was kidnapped a few
years ago by an outlaw and who has re-1
mained in bis poeeeesion since that time
? He explains that the girl has bisen treat?
ed kindly by bim and his family, and
that be and the captor of the girl at the
time of the kidnapping were were se?
cret friends, but since that time have
ceased to be such. He says the outlaw
came once to take the girl away, but
she reeisted so stubbornly that the man
? left without her and baa never seen him
since. He now wants the girl's pa?
rents or friends to come end take her
' away, as he is rapidly settling his ac
| counts."
?As Randolph began to talk tr e sick
man stirred, and before he waa through
: Reuben was sittirg upright in bed. The
sound of or<.< name had brough- the
fever-stricken man to conscio.raaaaaa
again, and fr.-m that moment he i radu
? allv better.
?To Be Continued.)
What an invertebrate is the ma o who
never haa the desire or courage to con?
tradict another. He must despise him?
self and certainly he is despised by
others.
?<xxxxxxxxxxx>too<xxxxxxxx>:
Greatest Subscription
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The Pittsburgh P?8t ra kiiigamon^ the Lading
metreep? lilan papers of the day, ie.e-i u.iele* this re?
markable otter tee ?>u renel-rs n\ :
The Pittsburgh Post, fJS" $2.25 Per Year
Tazewell Republican Weckly $1.00 Per Year
OR BOTH AT THE RATE OF $3 25
The jegular price of The Daily l'-^t is $5.00,
and NOW it is ottered t> you for lens than HALF
THE UOST if taken with the "TAZEWELLREPUBLICAN."
THINK OF IT!
This unusual otter is limited, which makes it
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FILL OUT THE ATTACHED COUPON, AND MAIL TO DAT TO
TAZEWELL REPUBLICAN
TAZEWELL, VIRGINIA
PITTSBUR6H POST SUBSCRIPTION BLANK
Tazewell Republican,
Tazewell, Va.
Gentlemen:
Enclose please find $3.25 for which please have
mailed to me, commencing at once. The Pittsburgh Post
(6 days a week) and the Tazewell Republican (weekly)
for one year each.
Box or R. F. D.
Town.State.
N. B.?This offer applies to our old subscribers as well as new.
extended for one rear from date at expiration.
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oc->?r<>?<xxxx><XKX>ac
CONDENSED SCHEDULE
CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD and OHIO RAILWAY and CAROLINA, GLINLHFIELD sil
OHIO RAILWAY of SOUTH CAROLINA
THE NEW SH. RT LINE BETWEEN
Dante, St. Paul and Speer's Ferry, Va., Johnson City, Tenn., Altapass and Ma;ioi,
N. C, and Spartanburg, S. C. "CLINCHFIELD ROUTE."
LFi ECT V? MAY 12 1912.
?0 5
MIXED
OAltT
P. M.
110
135
2 21
246
327
3 44
3 59
f4 18
440
456
534
647
654
f 708
759
824
846
f 922
f 950
10 05
NO. 3
PASS.
DAIIT
EASTERN STANOARD TIME
STATIONS
NORTH BCj-'D
1 MIXED
DAILY
A. M.
615
f 7 49
9 07
917
955
10 45
A M.
800
8 20
8 51
908
9 41
956
10 09
fTO 20
10 32
fl043
1115
1155
12 02
?1215
12 47
105
121
151
213
223
P. M.
????a
331
f 425
4 34
502
5 40
Leave Dante,
St. Paul,
Dungannon,
Ft Blackmore,
Speer'a Ferry,
" Cameron, Va.
" Kingsport,
" Pactolus,
" F?>rdtown,
" Gray,
"_ Johnson City
Arrive Erwin,
Leave Erwin,
Unaka Springs
Huntdale,
Green M't'n
Toecane
Boonford
Sprucepine
Arrive Altapass
Va.
Tenn.
Tenn.
N. C.
Leave
Arrive
Altapass
Marion
Koatic Yard
Forest City
Cbesnee
Spartan burg
S. C.
Leave
Arrive
Leave
Arrive
Leave
NO. 2
PASS.
DAILY
P. M.
12 45
1217
1140
1120
10 42
10 24
10 09
955
9 42
930
9 01
817
810
! 758
728
712
6 67
635
614
605
S PASS.
GAILY
P. M.
8 05
6 45
5 43
529
602
425
The Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway, and the Carolina, Clinchfu" J and
Ohio Railway, of South Carolina, "Clinchfield Route," reserves the right to vary
from the time shown above without notice to the public.
Patrons are requested to apply to nearest Ag< nt for definite information
or to
J. J. Campion, Chas. T. Manuel,
Vice-Pree. and Traffic Manager. T. P. A. In Charge Par?. Deft,
f?Flag Stop Johnson City, Tenn.
,CORTRIGHT
?^^a^^^^^ METAL
H If Vi' JJ^Jm/I//?J//'/ *W,, > /' ?///ft ?^?aaaiai ? a**lalaaf
i mm?mmam' shingles
m??^^^^^M LAID RIGHT
WWwWWr^VWW WER0LD1II00D :
rM^^^?^fj shingles ;
-f // ? Jw?*>'**m?m?em??B<r f **~ No dirt ? no bother, and ?vheaoae?
1-'-?//.''^'s^Hk^^^f^St^S^^7Kli??m """^ X^T m**e ? thoroughly atoms-proof
A j^i^J^ffMw/i/^^?f/Pn[iW eeA fire-proof roof, neither of which cai I
Wir\ 'm? ^^__i^^ujfl?llif *>e cl*'roed i?r the wood ?hingle.
* Aa to price?th?iy coal no more than ?
good wood ehitarie, aad ia aeese placea ihey coat much lea?.
Roof? put on 26 yean ?fo are a* good aa new today, and have new? *a***a*aV*i repair*.
FOR SALE BY
TAZEWELL PLANING MILL CO.,
TAZEWELL, VA.

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