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Virginia citizen. (Irvington, Va.) 1891-1921, May 17, 1907, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95079220/1907-05-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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?UHm.
Voi.umk XVI.
Weekly Journaljlevoted to the Interests cf Lancastei Cttniy in Particulai; tlie Horihem Neci and Rappahannock Valley in General, and the World at Large
IRVINGTON, VIRGINIA, FR1DAY, MAY 17, 1907.
NUMBEB 33.
CHAS. M. STRUVEN & CO.,
(Formerly with Struven & Wacker)
STEAMSHIP, FACTORY
AND
MACHINISTS' SUPPLIES.
WHOLESALE
GROCERS AND
SHIP CHANDLERS.
Btokers and Commission
Merchants For
MENHADEN FISH SCRAP
AND FISH OIL.
114 S. FREDER1CK STREET,,_BALTIMORE, MD.
ABENAQUE 2?S??iXE
ARE UNEXCELLED FOJt FARM WORK.
2 lo 18 Horse-power PortaDle a.id Stationary Engines.
MANUFACTUKEl) n Y.
ABENAQUE MACHINE WORKS,
WESTMINSTER STATION, VT
CATALOCJUE M.
O. B iVNIUFF A CO., Livoly, VA., Aeonts.
BUFFALO GASOLINE MOTORS
FOR
? TO 40 BOBUi POWIB.
CHESAPEAKE LAUNCH AND MOTOR CO., A'g'ts.,
BROOK AVE., NORFOLK, VA.
SKNH KOK CATAMMJUK.
SPEGIAL OFFER OF GASOLINE ENGINES.
We have sevcral 14 horse-power Buffalo Gasoline Motore, luat
?rar's iniulel, with this y?>ar's imrftovementa, right from factory,
#hich we offer for protnpt acceptance at $500, iuatalled in boat.
FRANK T. CLARK COMPANY, LTD,
Sash, Doors and Blinds,
Hardware, Paints, Varnishes,
Window and Door Screens.
i'oK3hed IMate and Window Glass, Mantela, Tiles and Grates.
Building Material Generally. Estimatee eheerfully given.
FRANK T. CLARK CO., Ltd.,
96-98 8R00KE AVENOE._NORFOLK, VIRGINIA.
MONUMENTS AND GRAVESTOKES.
We pay the fnight.and
guarantee safe dellvery.
Largest Stock in the South.
Illustratcd Catalogne Pree.
Establijhed 1S48.
|JTHE COUPER MARBLE WORKS,
;?'..-.3i2 159, 161 and 163 llank SlM NORFOLK, V*.
^^-^l?BJBJBJHBBJBflBJBl jBMBHBHBHBBBBBBBJ I BlBJBflHBBB^BlHBJBflHB
SASH, DOORS, BLINDS,
MANTELS, HARDWARE,
WINDOW AND DOOR SCREENS,
MILL WORK OF ALL KINDS.
C. A. NASH & SON,
Opposite Postoffice. NORFOLK, VA.
THAT'S THE NAME; THAT'S THE PLACE?
THE HAWKS-MAUPIN CO.,
J.15-117 HIQH STREET,
PORTSMOUTH, - YA.
SASH. MOULOINGS, GLASS, PAINTS,
DOORS, BRACKETS BLINDS. HARDWARE.
We have i Beautiful line of Mantela, Tile* and Grates, which we will be
glad to tell you about. l'rices right. Goods right All right.
WKITE US OK 8EE US.
THE GREAT POLICY-HOLDERS'CO.
*7-1. Why is It that the Union Central, while !ts nrcminma are low can nav
? the largest dividends? ' ? 7
lst. Becsuse the company Is cholce ln aelectlng Ita rlsks. Conaeqnence- a
ow ueatn rate. ? v
2iwl. Rccaaae for twenty years It has realized the highest lutereat rate
*/_X With what reault?
? We furnlsh maxirnurn insurance at miiilmmn coat.
Before taking Life Insurance wrlte foa ratea In the great I'olicy-holder
. i 9- ? E^MER ahd R. H. NORRIS, Kilmarnock, Va.
A<rencleJ:< A. C. BALL, Mnluak, Va.
( M. B. HTKIMIPELLOW, Rrandy, Va.
ADDRESS OF GOV.
CLAIDE A. SWANSON
At Jamestown, Being the Anniver
sary of the Third Century of
the Settlement There.
Mr. President, Memrers ov the
Association for the Preservation
of Virginia Antiquitiks, Ladies
and Rentlemen:
Three centuries ago today upon this
spot oceurred an event world-wide in
its significance and far-rcaching conse
quences. Here the great Anglo-Saxon
race founded its first permanent colony
in the Western world. The preat
English speaking people, who hold to?
day in their strong hands the destinies
of a world, have two sacrod spots wberc
they tirst planted thcmsolves andhe?:an
their world*s mission - "Ebbafleet" in
England and "Jamestown" in Virginia.
Ebbefleet, Ensland, was the lirst spot
of the P.ritish Isles that ever felt the
tread of English feet. There, in the
fifth century, our forefathers, emerg
ing from the forests of Northern
Europe, the wild nursery of nations,
first planted thomselves and conmienced
the conqucst and settlement of Britain.
After almost twelve centuries of fierce
strife and turmoil. civil wars and com
motions, terriblo defeats and glorious
victories, they finally triumphed and
gave to all Britain their rule, languago,
laws and institutions. All Britain
bjing conquored and united, ourfathers
more than a century after Columbus
had discovered the New World, under
took their second great mission. On
the 13th day of May, 1607, one hundred
and five Knglishmen. like their remote
ancestors, bold, daring and advonturous,
after crossing in three frail barks a
stormy sea, settled here at Jamestown
and became the founder of a glorious
Commonwcalth and of a wide-spread
Kepublic, whose mighty destiny, as it
unfolds, transcends the conccption of
human greatness and grandeur. Ebbs
tleet and Jamestown, each now almost
desolate and far removed from the
throbbing life of the mighty empires
and nations to which they gave birth,
each possi'ssed of a wierd, strange
beauty, recalling former scencs of wild
life and brave endeavor, must and will
over be to all English speaking people
their Meccas to which, revercnt hearts.
they will make pilgrimagetoponderthe
wonderful achievements of their aneos
torsandtogather inspiration to perform
their great world-work and duty. The
history of our race from Ebbsfleet to
Jamestown is one ofheroic achievements,
gk aming with glory in war and peace,
in science and in litcrature. During
centuries of darkness, oppression and
lyranny, our English ancestors alone
pivser\e-d constitutionalgovernment and
held aloft the torch of liberty. We ar?
proud to be joint heirs in this priceless
heritage of splendid deeds, which will
illumine forever the pathway of human
progress and endeavor. We are proud
of the rock from which .we were hewn.
We are proud of its granite strength
and solid proportions. We rejoice it
has withstood unshaken and unbroken
the mighty storms and earthquakes
which have overthrown other stupen
dous structures. We are proud to spoak
the language of Shakespeare and Milton.
Proud to be of the blood of Hampden
and Chatham. In this, the year of our
jubilee, our hearts with ahounding and
abiding affection return to old England,
and we wish all measure of happiness
and prosperity to the land of our fore?
fathers. We hope in the coming years,
the colossal power possessed by these
kindred people will never again be
used against each other in contest and
strife, but will ever be invoked and used
for the enlightenment and advancement
of mankind.
With the settlement at Jamestown
the history of American and of modern
England really begins. Then England
commenced that vast system of coloniza
tion which has carried her rule, laws,
institutions and civilization on every
continent, in every clime and among
every people. From thence she became
a mother of nations. From Plymouth
Rock to Savannah she founded coloniee
which afterwards became great states
in the American Union. She wrested
from France Canada, with vast posses
sions, stretching to the North Pole.
She acquired colonies in the far waters
of the Pacific, exceeding in territory
and richness any domain ever ruled by
the Ciesars. She conquered and rules
the mighty empire of India, which has
resisted the arms and thwarted the
triumphs of Alexandria. Her settlers
disputed Africa with the Kaffir, Hotten
tot and savages and finally opened the
dark continent to settlement and civili?
zation. She has gone to Egypt, the
most ancient and decadent of nations
and stirred her to mod.ern life and
activity. Here on this spot, on the 13th
of May, 1607, Britain commenced that
wonderful career of colonization and
conquest which haschanged the destinies
of the world and directed its course of
civilization. That day was so memor
able that it belongs not alone to Vir?
ginia, the United States and England,
but to the world.
But of all the influences originating
from Britain, of all her deeds, the most
important, the one that has been the
most potential in the affairs of the world
and for the betterment of mankind was
the founding of the colonies fringing
the Atlantic coast, which afterwards
were formed into this mighty nation.
The advent of the Anglo-Saxon, with
his sentimentsof freedomand individual
rights, to the new world marked the
beginning of a social revolution, which
has not only deeply affected Great
Britain but has permeated every nation
of the Globe. Privilege, caste, aristo
cracy and feudalism were poworless in
the wilderness. The needsof the situa?
tion ?rar? energy and strength to fell
forests. cultivato (ields, fight savages,
build home8, construct roads and bridge
rivers. Enterprise, courage, character
and capacity became the measure of
success. Idle and listless drones, how
ever high their station or gentle their
blood, found no suitable place in the
primeval foreats of America and disap
peared in disgraceand despair. Achieve
mcntsalonegave title of nobility. Amer?
ican communities and commonwealths
were constructed on these principles.
Here calmly and without erime human
ity made for itself a new existence.
This new social system, founded in the
forcsts of America, has been the most
potentia! factor in the modern regenera
tion, pttigreasand uplifting of man. Its
principles have permeated every civilized
country. bringingincreasod opportunity,
onjoyment and rights to the masses. In
England itmade. theycomanry and com
mercial classes the dominating forces
in her national policies, giving her new
vigor, thus enabling her to attain her
present power and greatness. Through
blood and war it rogoncrated France,
overthrew her entire soeial structure
and brought relicf to an oppressed and
down-trodden people. It cmancipatcd
the serfs of Russia. It has given free
schools and public libraries. It has
modificd the cruel criminal codes.
Equality. fraternity. oharity and philan
trophy sprung from its prevalence. It
has thrown a halo of hope over a world's
sorrows. It has pointed to all nations
the way to be renewed. Dutch, French,
Swedes, Germans, Irish and Scotch re
nouneed their nationality to obtain the
benefits of the new order. The bold,
adventurous of these nations, blending
with the English, formed a new race,
the American, superior to them all.
This race, Um latcst and best. not only
eootaola tbadeatiniea ofa eoatfnent but
has given an impulse to human al!*airs
everywhere, which will continue for
countless centurie?. This great social
revolution was but a precursor to the
great poiitical revolution of 177G when
these colonies revolted from Britain
and established their independence.
That revolution marked a new era in
government. Then a new sanction was
given to government. For the first
time government was organized on the
broad principle. "that all the just
powers of government aiv d,rived from
the eonscnt of the governed." The
peoples* divine right of rule and r.-\..
lution was established. Tuworinjj oyer
monarchs and rulers, over parliaments
Bad h'gislatures were placod the people,
the source of all power and the mastei
of servantswho must obey. The dyna
mic force of this doctrine has shaken
to their very foundation most of the
govcrnments of the world. It has
wrung from reluctant monarchs con
stitutional government, wif h legislative
bodies elected by the people. In Britain
it has given the prerogatives of the
crown to Parliament, reformed Parlia
ment and made it a representative of
the people. It has destroyed the tyran
nical doctrine that colonies were created
for exploitation and spoliation.
It has circled the world with self
governing colonies. It drove Spanish
power from the Western hemisphere
and dedicated it to liberty and the peo?
ple. It has overthrown kingdoms; it
has marshalled armies; it has fought
battles; it has destroyed dynasties and
changed again and again the map of the
world. This great principle, with its
uplifting force is under every throneof
the universe and is the harbinger of
many and mighty revolutions yet to
come for its relief and reform. It opened
a new chapter in the history of mankind,
each succeeding page of which, when
turned, thrills and brightens. The pro
gress of this people under the prevalence
of these new social and poiitical princi?
ples has been unparalleled. Our na?
tional story reads more like a romance
than a history. From small settlements
scattered along the Atlantic coast we
have become forty-six sovereign states,
with possessions extending from the
Atlantic to the Pacific, from the ices of
Maine to the orange blossoms of Flor
ida. As if by magic the haunts of sav
ages and wild beasts have been trans
formed into cities of splendor and
magnificence. The sombre forest, with
their melancholy shade, which then en
veloped America, have been succeeded
by green meadows, cultivated fields,
rich orchards, fine farms,thriving towns
and cities. The trails of buffaloes,
winding through dense forest and over
high mountains have been followed and
laid by iron rails, carrying acroas
continent the greatest inland traffic
ever possessed by a people. Rivers
have been bridged that the wildest im
agination of engineers never conceived
possible. While subduing nature our
fatherswere in continuousconflict with
the warlike savages of the forests' soli
tudes. Almost all that remain of<
these fierce and implicable foes are the
names of rivers and mountains and the
designation of places. Every step of
advance made from the Atlantic to the
Pacific has been through danger and
difficulties; almost every spot sanctified
by courage; almost every place made
sacred by sacrifice and privation. In
three centuries the one hundred and
five colonist who settled here have
grown into almost as many millions.
From petty and despised dependants,
vainly petitioning parliament and king,
we have become a great power, most
potential in the affairs of the world,
courted and respected by all. We have
become strong enough to announce and
maintain the great Monroe doctrine,
which extends our pretection to the
Western hemisphere anddefends it from
foreign aggression and conqueat.
When this colony was planted here
Spain ruled with an iron hand .more
than half the world. But a few years
ago this nation. which grew from this
small beginning, drove Spain from the
Western world and destroyed her colo
nial empire. The history of this nation
from Jamestown to the walls of Pekin
in China indicate an heroic achievement,
a growth in greatness and power unex
celled. From suffering and poverty
we have grown to comfort and wealth.
Our wealth today is greater than that
of any other nation. From an agricul?
tural people we have become the
greatest manufacturing people in the
world; the products of factories exceed
ing those of Britain and continental
Europe combined. Our mines now fur
nish the world more than half its min
eral products and wealth. Rich plains
and prairies over which herds of wild
buffaloes wandcred are now the gran
aries of the world. Cotton has become
king of plants and the world's comfort
and clothing are dependent upon the
white fields of the South. In mechan
ieal applianccs and inventions our people
liave achieved wondcrs. more astound
ing than any of which alchemists ever
dreamed. In miles of railroads, in nay
igable rivers, in facilities and means of
transportation. we are unsurpassed.
We occupy today the foremost places
in the world's commercc, our exports
now excoeding those of Britain. "Re?
cently we have become suprcme in
ftnance, our banking capital being the
greatest of any nation. The world's
financial heart now throbs inNew York
and its pulsation affectsthe world. In?
stead of three small ships?Susan Con
stant, God Speed and Discovcry ?which
landed the colonies here, we have now
a navy second only to that of Great
Britain and which we propose to in
crease until it shall equal that of any.
Our phenominal development has not
been confined to material things. The
pioneer as he advanced across the con?
tinent constructed the log church and
schoolhouse contemporaneously with
his rude cabin. Education and Chris
tianity have kept pace with our won?
derful industrial progress. We have
created a vast system of public educa?
tion, generously supported by govern
ment, extending from primary schools
to splendid universities, which bring the
blessings and benefits of education
within the rcach of all. Here education
is more generally diffused than else
wh.ro. Today in the United States
there aic n.oro schools, more scholars.
more fine collegesand universities, more
gOOd libraries. larger expenditures and.
endowments for education than in any
nation of the world. We have created a
national iiterHture, distinctive and cred
table and which in the same length of
time has never been equalled. We have
furnished poets historians, essayists,
novelists, scientists, whose productions
are read and prized the world over. It is
true we have not yet reached the highest
elevation, but with time and patience
we will climb the dbsictt befgfcta of
learning and genius. Freedom of action
and opportunity havebrought us a won?
derful material wealth, freedom of
thought and opportunity will in time
give us an amazing intellectual wealth.
Our innumerable free asylums, hos
pitals and charitable institutions, our
vast contribution to churches and mis
sions bear testimony that our wealth
and Christianity have advanced hand in
hand.
We have made a national history,
every page of which is illuminated with
courage, heroism, success and hope.
We have furnished jurists, orators,
statesmen, whose genius and achieve?
ments have placed them forever among
the immortals. We have waged war,
and our triumphs there are as marked
as are those of peace. In naval war
fare we have Lake Erie, Santiago,
Manila, and on land Trenton, Saratoga,
Yorktown, New Orleans, which proves
us possessed of great military prowess
and places us high in the annals of
warfare. This nation has engaged in
the greatest war of all times. In
number of men engaged, in number of
men and amount of property sacrificed,
in number of battles fought, in contin
uous duration and in exten^of territory
over which waged the late civil war, it
was the greatest war of all countries
and of all ages. The splendid courage,
the high military genius displayed by
each side in that terrific conflict has
surrounded this nation with a halo of
glory that is eternal, and brought to it
the profound respect and awe of all
nations. The fierce passions and enmi
ties engendered by that conflict have
disappeared and we are more so than
ever one people- one in love of flag and
country, one in all future destiny. The
flag once rent now fioats without a
seam. All this has been accomplished
within three centuries. It is so wonder?
ful that the mere recital of it, in homely
phrase, appears as the language of ex
travagance. As to what this young
western giant will be and do when he
attains to manhood, human foresight is
powerless to prophesy. This mighty
kiepublic is yet fresh with the dews of
morning. The glories of its noontide
are yet to come. Decay has not even
touched the majestic fabric reared by
three centuries of courageous battling.
Despair has had no part in found ing or
building America. Hope eternal, cour?
ageous hope, has ever been the pillar
of cloud by day, the pillar of fire by
night to guide us through the wilder
ness. Standing today on an eminence
that overlooks three hundred years of
brave endeavor, let us fearlessly face
the future, which beckons us on to a
higher, nobler destiny.
As we stand here on this spot where
we began, and survey with pride and
patriotism the pathway we have trav
eled and ponder the perils over which
we have passed and perceive that in all
we have had the sustaining hand of a
Divine Providence let us strengthen and
confirm our Christian faith, and let m
resolve to give willing service and sac
rifice to our country. Let us determine
to preserve thepriceless principlc of in
diyidual liberty and equal opportunity,
which constitutes the foundatian of our
prospcrity, from the destructive assaults
alike of socialism and predatory wealth.
With strong arms and brave hearts let
us press forward to our responsible duty
and perform our part of the world's work.
Today as we gather on these grounds,
around which cluster so many historical
associations and heroic deeds, our pulse
cannot fail to quickcn and our minds to
thrill with lofty purposes and high am
bitions. Here for almost a century was
the chief seat and capitol of Anglo-Sax?
on power in the Western world. Here
the adventurous and chivalrous Smith
ruled, and by his resolutc courage and
indomitable energy made the settlement
permanent and founded the first English
colony. Here were undergone perils
and privations sufficient to daunt the
stoutest heart. Here Pocahontas, the
gentle Indian princess, was wooed, won
and wedded. Here was empannelled
the first jury that ever administered jus
tice in the Western hemisphere. Here
Christianity built her first church in
America. Here assembled in 1619 the
House ofBurgesses, the first legislative
body elected by the people that ever sat
or enacted laws for the new world. Here
in 1624 the House of Burgesses holdly
declared that no taxes could be levied or
collected in Virginia except by the duly
elected reprcsentativcs of the people.
This was prior to the conflict in Eng?
land between Charles the First and the
British Parliament. Here also the
House of Burgesscs refused to grant
to Charles the First a monopoly of
their tobacco and severely punished
their clerk for furnishing his Commis
sioner a copy of their proceedings.
Here in 1635 the House of Burgesses
deposed the royal Govemor Harvey and
elected Captain.Tohn West in his place.
This was the first bold, direct defiance
of royal authority and the first rcvolu
tionary act in America. Here in MH
the Virginia people eompelled the Com
missioners of Oliver Cromwell, whose
iron hand had crushed the British Par?
liament, to concede that no taxes should
be imposed or collected except by the
consentof the General Assemhly of Vir
ginia. lHiringCroniwell'sdespotic rule in
England the Governors of Virginia were
here elected by the representatives of
the people, and the writs ran in the
nanje of the General Assembly. Here
in 1676 was the first armed rebellion
against British tyranny and oppression.
then Nathaniel Bacon and his followers
by force of arms drove Berkeley from
Jamestown and seized the reins of gov
erment. Then and there were sown the
seed which afterwards ripened into the
Revolutionary war and brought indepen
dence to this nation. The very air of
this place isredolent with achievements.
Every spot could unfold a taleof suffer?
ing, tears and blood. Romance and
heroism will ever envelop Jamestown
with and unfading interest and lustre.
The poet tells us that the Iyre vibrates
with sweet sound after the spirit that
swept its strings has passed away. So
in the coming years will Jamestown,
still vibrating from the touchof her im
mortal dead, stir the souls of all Amer
icans to lofty aspirations and induce
them to raise the nation here founded
to the highest pinacles of goodness,
greatness and glory.
Of all the frult3 there are in thelan.l,
That Krowonbush or tree,
I would give up tue choicest oue*
For Hollister's Koeky MountainToa.
It. M. Samlers, White stone; K.C. lUehard
soii, Kilraarnock.
LAWYEM WHO SELL SOULS.
William Jennings Bryan told three
hundred Chicago lawyers whathethinks
of the legal profession in America.
The picture on the whole was not
a bright one. As a graduate of the
Old Union College of Law, which has
since become the Northwestern Uni
versity Law School, Mr. Bryan attended
the annual dinner of the graduates of
the institution. The title of his address
was "The Price of a soul."
"I beleive," he said in conclusion,
"that the day will come in this country
when we will not have so many men
who will sell their souls to make grand
larcency possible.
"Perhaps some time it will not be
less disgraceful for a lawyer to assist in
a gigantic robbery than for a highway
man to go out and hold up the wayfarer.
I knew of a case recently in which they
had to go to New York to get lawyers
to represent the people, because all the
lawyers available nearer at hand had
been bought up."
J RickeU. g
A Simply the visible sign that baby's tiny bones A
?Qt are not forming rapidly enough. X,
4? Lack of nourishment is the cause. A
? Scoffj Emtllsion nourishes baby's
V entire system. Stimulates and makes bone.
^ Exactly what baby needs.
?Q? ALL DRUGGISTSi 60c. AND $1.00
Established In 1802.
C. S. SCHERMERHORN <&, SON,
Recelvera, Shippera, Dealers,
ORAIN, IIAY, MILL FEED8, 8EED OATS, LIN8EE1) MEAL,
COTTON 8EED MEAL, ULUTEN FEED.
Alao Diatrlbutora of
THE PUBINA POULTBY FEED8.
127 and 129 Cheapside, <N*ar pran sueet,) BALTIMORE MD
AFRO-AMERICAN NOTES.
SHARON'S ANN1VERSARY.
Pursuant to appointment, on the
nights of May 2nd and 3rd and Sunday
the 5th, Sharon Raptist Church cele
brated the eighth anniversary of the
church and the 39th anniversary of their
pastor. It was a financial suecess. and
indeed, a suecess in every way. The
music was rendered in a most accepta
ble manncr with Miss Edith I. Edwards
presiding at the organ. Rev. D. H.
Chamberlayne, B. D., preached a fine
sermon on Thursday night. On Friday
night Rev. H. V. Washington, B. T.,
preached a fine sermon which was en
joyed by all. After the public services
were over the pastor marched up the
aisle to the lune of "Onward Christian
Soldier," cscorted by Sisters P. M. Ed?
wards and Clara Gaskins, Sister Flos
sie RIackwell going on before carrying
a cross on which there was a crown
with many stars. The pastor was then
presented with a purse of $18.64, the
presentation speech being made by
Maater of Ceremonies, Brother M. J.
Edwards. Next there was a reception
given the pastor, deacons, members
and friends, by the committee, which
was a fine affair and highly enjoyed by
all. In his presentation speech Brother
Edwards spoke of the pastor's eight
years* work in that neighborhood, and
among many other good things he said
that while he was not boasting, yet he
would say that when Rev. Tucker came
there eight years ago he found this
people then nine in number, without a
house of worship, but today they have
a house and site on which it stands, all
paid for and a membership of 130 odd,
which speaks well for his suecess along
that line. His demeanor to the church
and people of the neighborhood has
been that of a sympathetic friend, a
gentleman and a christian. ln the ad
ministration of the business affairs of
the church he has shone himself to be a
judicious ruler and leader, and these
traits have won for him a place in the
hearts of this church and people that
will ever be cherished. The services
were continued on Sunday, when Rev.
H. V. Washington preacded another
soul-stirring sermon. Rev. A. H. Mon
tague was also presented and spoke
somo very complimentary and encour
aging words to the pastor, choir and
church generally. The following com?
mittee had charge of all arrangements:
Mrs. Pauline M. Edwards, President;
Mrs. Sadie Taylor, Secretary; M.
J. Edwards, Master of Ceremonies
Mrs. Martha Parker, Mrs. S. M. Schey,
Mrs. Clara Gaskins, Mrs. Maggie
Rean, Mrs. Flossie Rlickwell, Mrs.
Winnie Johnson, Mrs. Frazier Parks
Mrs. May Wood and Mrs. Susan Lewis!
THE COMPOSER OF "IN A PER
SIAN UABUEX."
All lovers of vocal music, and especi
ally works for mixed voices, have for
some years been familiar with the song
cycle entitled "In a Persian Garden."
The composer of this unique master
piece?which was inspired by and aet to
the words of the "Rubaiyat of Omar
Khayyam," is Madame Liza Lehmann.
An interesting article on the life and
work of this charming woman, who was
a famous singer before she retired from
public life in order to compose, appears
in the June number of the New Idea
Woman's Magazine. The author, who
interviewed Madame Lehmann in her
home at Wimbledon, near London, gives
delightful glimpses of the quiet life
which the artist lives here with her
husband, Mr. Herbert Bedford, and
their children. Many interesting pho
tographs, showing Mme. Lehmann in
her home surroundings, addto thevalue
of the text.
Where is
Your Hair?
In your comb? Why so? Is
not the head amuch better place
for it? Better keep what is left
where itbelongs! Ayer's Hair
Vigor, new improved formula,
quickly stops falling hair.
There is not a particle of doubt
about it. We speak very po?;
tively about this, for we know.
Does not change the color of the hair.
A
uers
Formula with etoh bottle
Show- it to your
doctor
Ask him about it.
then do aa ha aaya
Indeed, the one great leading feature of
our new Hair Vigor may well be said to
be this ?it stops falling hair. Then it
goes one step further?it aids nature in
restoring the hair and scalp to a healthy
condition. Ask for "the new kind."
-?Made by tho J. C. Ayer Co.. Lowall. Uni..aa
Encourage home enterpriae and buy your
himber of w. H. Jeaae. Lltwalton. Lancaster
Co. Materlal tbe beat, prleea low, big f Ntghtl
?aved.
TO MERCHANTS, CANNERS
AND BOAT OWNERS:
Buy your coal oll, gaaoline oll,
and lubricatiug olla from ua. We
guaranlee full meaaure, aad low
eat wholeaale prices. Large ware
houae aud coroplete atock. We
pay caah for empty oil barrela.
W. A. DAMERON A BRO.,
Agent Standard Oil Co.,
Weema. Va.
PUOFJBSSIONAIj.
?)K. G. H. OLIVKK,
UESIDENT DENTIST.
IRVINGTON. - . VIRU1NU
(Offic? over Bank.)
must... bro.MSr.fiy*; JisspvnSf
wV/,\,^,(MX'Uo,:5a8ad,nl?i^?-re' ? ,"Ve0
*-S5W^ags:
}?o?n,*S;,- ?*??* ?n W?lUeaoa,a. wbea*
Turras: Strlctly caab.
DENTIST AT K ILM AltKOCK.
j?* 9Bk J wi,l be at Reedvlllc to
ABSBSfm practiccdcntiBtrytbefiiM
vaaXXU-^ Monday in each month
liest of time will be at Kilwaruock
Crown aud bridge work,8pCcialtle8 Gas
adminlstered. Offlce ln bank.
R. VV. Palmek, DentlBt.
W. T. MAYO,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Haoui, Va.
H. B. CI1ASE,
8URVEYOK,
KILMARNOUK, VA.
doue. V2L aSC"* Md P'0^*1*
\yARNEK BALL,
ATTORNET-ATLAW,
Monaskon, Lancastek Co., Va.
?uSLESSSSman lhe Courto of tb" ??
Promptattentionalvea toaJlle*albu.lneaa.
W. ?. DATHAWAT. -J. __
HATHAWAY 4 NORRiS,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
Orricas: Whlte 8tone and Lively, Va.
d-yl m*J*&* Mondaya. Tuo
\CU. J: ^^neadaya, aod at the
"loteMonootliee:,!! other .laya.
Yf9 McDONALD LEE,
(NOTARY PUIIL1C.)
CIVILENGINEERANDSLKYLYOK
IRVINtildN, VA
rS^ eifflgte gJBL
S? ??Hsw8KgS8
F. L. CRANDY.
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NORFOLK. VA.
Will furnlsh you
Qrain, Hay, Mill-Feed,
Peas, Etc,
Of the best gradea. Rappahannock
trada aapplied at rock-bottom prlcea.
MONUMENTS AND GRAVESTOHES.
To all who con
template the erec
tion of a Monu
ment, Statue or
Gravestone iu Mar
ble or Granite, it
will be to their
iutere8t to call on
or address
LAWSON & NEWTON,
Cor. 11th and Williams Sta.,
NORFOLK, - VA.
Bell Tntinc No. :*752.
VIRGINIA FIRE & MARINE
INSURANCE COMPANY.
(HARTERED 1832.
RICHMOND. VA.
Aaaetav - - $750,500.
WM. H. PALMEK, Preat.
WM. H. McCARTY, 8ecy
We do the most popular Insurance
husineas in the State. When your
bou8eburns you get your money.
B. H. BAIRD, Agent
WARSAW, VA.
BRICK! BRICK! BRICK!
The place to buv Brick is at
LEVIN T. BUCK & CO'S.,
Weems, Vam
Manufacturera of
all grades of
PAVING AND BUILDING BRICKS.
We can deliver Brick to
any point on water front.
SS^VoIk MiJler's
Liver Pills" nt*c?t*
1 at B^a a Ux a t all Drar Stwct aa< Ceaatrr ShVM

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