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Virginia citizen. (Irvington, Va.) 1891-1921, May 24, 1907, Image 1

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VOLUMB XVI.
Weekly Journal Devote^tojltejiiteiests ol Lancssiei Cccoiy in Parlicular; the Horthern Neck and Rappahannock Valley in General, and the World ai large
IRVINGTON, VIRGINIA, FRIDAY, MAY 24, 1907.
Nttmrtct* M4
CHAS. M. STRUVEN & CO.,
(Formerly with Struven & Wacker)
STEAMSHIP, FACTORY
AND
MACHINISTS' SUPPLIES.
WHOLESALE
QROCERS AND
SHIP CHANDLERS.
Brokers and Commission
Merchants For
MENHADEN FISH SCRAP
AND FISH OIL.
114 S. FREDER1CK STREET.,_BALTIMORE, MD,
ABENAQLlE~2???^SE
ARE UNEXCELLED FOR FARM WORK.
2 to 18 Horse-power Ponable M Stationaiy Engines,
MANPFACTUUED BY
ABENAQUE MACHINE WORKS,
WESTMINSTER STATION, VT
CATALOGUE M.
O. ? iIi'MUKF & CO.. LIvely, VA.. Aarenls.
BUFFALO GASOLINE MOTORS
FOR
MlORK BOaTS M4V) \ia\1NCV\ES.
I to 40 hoksi: POW1B.
CHESAPEAKE LAUNCH AND MOTOR CO., A'g'ts.,
brook ave., NORFOLK, VA.
SKMl H)K C'ATAI.OtilTK.
SPEGIAl OFFER OF GASOLINE ENGINES.
We have several 14 horse-power Hnffalo Goaoline Motore, luat
^rar's tnodel, with thia year'a iniprovcmenta, right from factory,
**hich we oflVr for prompt acceptance at $500, installed in boat.
FRANK T. CLARK COMPANY, LTO.,
Sash, Doors and Blinds,
Hardware, Paints, Varnishes,
Window and Door JScreens.
i'olijhcd Plate and Window Glasa, Mantele, Tilea and Gratea.
Uuilding Material Generally. Estimatee cheerfully given.
FRANK T. CLARK CO., Ltd.,
96-98 BROOKE AVENUE. NORFOLK, VIRGINIA.
y.
MONUMENTS AND GRAVESTONES.
Vr I We pay the f rclght, and
r^ guarantee safe delivery.
Largest Stock in the South.
Illufitrated Catalogne Free.
Established 1848.
THE COUPER MARBLE WORKS,
159, 161 aud 163 liank Si., NORFOLK, VA.
SASH, DOORS, BLINDS,
MANTELS, HARDWARE,
WINDOW AND DOOR SCftEENS,
MILL WORK OF ALL KINDS.
C. A. NASH & SON,
Opposite Postoffice. NORFOLK, VA.
THE HAWKS-MAUPHIN CO.,
SASH, MANTELS, PAINTS, BUILDING
DOORS, TILING, OILS, PAPERS,
BLINDS, GRATE3, ' GLAS3, VARNISHES,
MOULDINGS, BRACKETS, ETO.
115-117 HIGH STREET, PORTSMOUTH, VA.
m
THE GREAT POLICY-HOLDERS' CO.
^-*? Why is It that the Unlon Central, while Its premiums are low can nav
? the largest dividends? ' * *
lst. Because the company ls cholce ln seleetlng Its rlsks. Conseouence- a
ow death rate. M B
2ud. Because for twenty years lt has realized the higheat Interest rate
?/_2. With what rcsultr
? We furatsh maxiraum lnsurance at minlmmu cost.
Before taking Life lnaurance write for rates ln the great Pollcy-holder
(C. P. PALMER and R H. NORRI8, KUmarnock, Va.
Agencloi:-{ A. C. BALL, Molusk Va
(M. 8. STKINOPKLLOW, Brandy, Va.
MY SUIT OF CONFEDERATE GRAY.
I BOOBT was ono of the careful kitul,
For saving and hoarding away:
If it were not so I'd never been
As poor as I am today.
I hadnone of the careof the thrif ty and
keen,
When the wages of toil I could claim;
But ever to me the best of it all
Was the pleasure of spending the same.
But there*9 just one thing I wouhl like
to keep
As carefully hoarded away
As the gold of the miser?and that one
thing
Is my suit of Confederate Gray.
It was made in a Southern loom, of wool
From sheep that were Southern bred:
It wasfashioned andsewed by the dear
est hands
That ever used needle and thread.
It was handsomeand bright when I put
it on;
And proud as a prince was I
Of my wife, my suit and the cause in
whieh
I was pledgod to conqucr or die.
I dreofaaod notof failure, thought notof
dofoot,
As 1 turned to the conflict away;
Away from wife. naother and children
and home
Ia my suit of Confederate Gray.
I marehed and paraded, 1 rested aad
drilled,
I Bto and I slept; night and day;
I skirmished and fougnt, advanced and
fell back
In my suit of Confederate Gray.
It was slashed and riddled by saber and
ball;
It wassoiled with thedust of theroad;
It was mottled all over with ghastly
stains
Of my own and another's blood.
But it's fairor than silk andsatin to me;
It is dearer than gold this day;
The treasure and pnde of my heart and
my life
Is my suit of Confederate Gray.
For, after one battle, eame General Lee,
And reined in his steed where I lay
In a puddle of blood, between comrades
slain,
In my suit of Confederate Gray.
"I'm sorry, my friend. Would God 1
had been
In your stead on this terrible day P'
Were his words, and a tear from his eye
fell down
On my suit of Confederate Gray.
The fields of our battles are OOTOfod
with grain,
Where wc RBBgfct is now smiling and
tajr;
But nothing can brighten or froohOB
again
My suit of Confederate Gray.
It can nevermore be as I saw it first.
As the hand of its fashioner, fair;
Like the Southern heart, the rents and
the scars,
And thegashes andslains :ire still there.
Oh, it carries me back ! l*m a soldier
once more,
Light-hearted and daring and gay;
I'm a Southern rebel whenever I look
At my suit of Confederate Gray !
Put it on, when my form all breathlcss
and cold,
In the dust of the grave ye shall lay;
For I want to rest till the Great Cap
tain calls
In my suit of Confederate Gray.
? F. H. Marr, in Baltimore Sun.
FISH AND OYSTER NOTES
The alligator, like the larger pacher
derms and mammals, is fast becoming
extinct. The chief cause for this is that
the young ones are caught and stuffed
by taxidermists and used for playthings
by the children of large cities.
Shad fishing is fine in Chesapeake Bay.
The fishermen at the head of the Ches?
apeake Bay are enjoying the best catch
they have had in fifteen years. Quite
a coincidence is the fact that a large
numberof small fish, particularly rock
and herring, are being caught in the
shad gill nets.
In Alaska is found a kind of fish that
makes a capitol candle when it is dried.
The tail of the fish is stuck into the
crack of a wooden table to hold it up
right and its nose is lighted. It givesa
good, steady light of three-candle power
and considerable heat and will burn for
about three hours.
From an old well at Lexington, Ky.,
was taken a four pound bass which like
the fish of Mammoth Cave had no eyes.
The well wasbuilt in 1871, and is fed
by two springs. It has been closed for
twenty years, and the fish is believed
to have swam into it from a subterra
nean creek under the city.
People marvel at the mechanism of
the human body, with its 248 bones and
sixty arteries. But man is simple in
this respect compared with the carp.
That remarkable fish moves no fewer
than 4,386 bones and muscle every time
it breathes. It has 4,320 veins, to say
nothing of its ninety-ninemuscles.
Horace G. Deming, a student in the
University of Washington, has made
the valuable discovery that an oderless
fish fertilizer can be manufactured
without affecting the vaiue of the by
products. Deming asserts that more
than 400,000 tons of rawmaterial, capa
ble of being manufactured into first
class fish fertilizer, are wasted every
year in the Northwest.- Fishing Ga
zette.
The trial trip of the new fishing
steamer PeterC. Struven took place last
week at Baltimore. The run was made
down the river as far as the Seven Foot
Knoll, during which time a thorough
test was made of her enginea and the
speed attained was about 15 miles an
hour. The Struven was built for Messrs.
Bellows it Squires, of Ocran, Va., toen
gage in menhaden fishing, and named
after the late Peter C. Struven, of Balti?
more, who was for many years identi
fied with that industry in the Chesa?
peake Bay, She was built at Poco
moke City by E. J. Tull. Her length is
130 feet over all, 22 feet beam and 10
feet molded depth. The machinery was
built by E. J. Codd. The engines are of
the steeple compound type, with cylin
ders 14 inches and 28 088008 in diameter
and 21 inches stroke of piston. A Scotch
return tubular boiler 11 feet in diameter
and 12 feet long, tested to 150 pounds
working pressure, furnishes steam. It
is expected to have the steamer ready
this week to start fishing. The annual
fitting out and overhauling of the fleet
of menhaden fishing steamers has been
about compleleted, and there are but
few of the boats which have not taken
their departure for the fishing grounds
as yet. The cold and late spring made
the season of catching very late this
year.
The oyster buobaOBJ in Virginia is
about ended for this season, as the
demand fol oysters stops in most places
when we miss the letter "R" months,
and while some few persons think oys?
ters good to eat in months that have no
"R" in their spelling, May, June, July
and August, the public in general knows
better and also knows the main reason is
that fish, clams and lobstersare cheaper
than oysters during that time, so eat
them until fall commences and they
wanta change again in their dietof sea
food. The past season has been a suc
cessful one with most people engaged in
the oyster business in this State, for
which many causes have been to blame,
the main one being the great. scarcityof
stock on about all oyster beds in Vir?
ginia, but more so in James River than
any other place. as we have had hardly
any sct of young oysters in that river
for over three years now, and to make
the packing buisness a success in Nor?
folk the dealers must get plenty of stock
from James River. Almost everybody
connected with the oyster business here
has some pcrsonal view in regard to
what is l>est to bring it to a more pro
titablo ataadpoiot than it is at present,
but by what we can hear the majority
BOOOBS to think tbat 08 long as our nat
tural beds are well protected during the
summer months, toward which our
present State Board of Fisherics Kfl do
ing all they pooaibly ean, and that all
worn out and unproductive oyster bot
toms should bo leased out to planters so
they can reseed them and thereby create
a bigger supply of stock, which also
would give the State a revenue for oys?
ter bottoms that now yield them noth
ing, then in time to eome we would h;i\i
more oysters and do the oyster buisness
that was done in this State some yeais
ago. ?Norfolk letter in N. Y. Fishing
Gazette.
Will you kindly answer in your tjiu-ry
Column of next Sunday's POBOf whether
or not there is a law in Virginia pio
hibiting non-residcnts of the State from
owning oyster land in the State of V r
ginia, and whether or not this law op
,plies to shares in a company incor;io: -
ated under the laws of the State'.
J. M. L.
The Constitution provides that the
natural oyster beds, rocks and shoals
in the waters of Virginia shall not be
leased, rented or sold, but shall be held
in trust for the benefit of the people of
the State. The Code provides that if
any person, other than a resident of
Virginia. shall take or catch crabs,
oysters or other shell fish in any of the
waters of this State, or rent any oyster
planting ground or plant oysters in any
of the waters of the State, he shall bc
deemed guilty of a felony. The law
applies also to non-resident stockholders.
?Times-Dispatch.
It'stoo had to see people who tro from day to
Bay sutrerinjf from phyaic-ul weakness when
Holllster's luicky Mountain Ten would make
them well. The Rreatest tonle kuown.
35 cents. Tea or Tablcta. U. M. Sunders,
White Stone: ElllaC. Riehardson. Kilmarnock.
HOW BATTLESHIPS DECLINE.
The recent sale of a number of once
powerful but now obsolete British war
vessels at an -extremely low figure calls
attention anew to the rapid depreciation
of this species of property. Among the
vessels sold was the SansParell, afirst
class battleship, built only twenty years
ago at a cost of $3,600,000. This expen
sive piece of property brought only
$133,000. The third-class battleship
Conqueror, costing $2,100,000,brought
$85,000. The first classarmored cruiser,
Undaunted, which cost $1,200,000,
brought $72,000. Three other vessels
were disposed of at bargain prices.
The stipulation that the vessels
should be broken up in England pre
veted. their purchase by foreign powers
for war purposes, so that these once for
midable fighting machineswere sold for
the material used in their construction.
In these days of progressive improve
ment in fighting craf t there is no telling
how soon the mostcostly vessels will be
come useless.
THE JUNE SMART 9ET
J. H. Twells, jr., istheauthor of the
novel which opens the June number of
The Smart Set. The story is entitled
"One man's Hour" and is a purely ro
mantic tale, f ull of action and adventure.
A young English publisher falls in love
with a beautiful American giri and fol
lows her to Paris, where the real story
begins. The remarkable incidents which
follow should cause the most jaded reader
to become enthusiastic. Other contrib
utors to this number are: Zona Gale,
John G. Neihardt, J. Lee Matherson!
Mrs. Henry Dudency, Gelett Burgess,
W. J. Henderson, Catherine Carr,
Arthur Stanley Wheller, Katherine Met
calf Roof, etc.
Arthur Symons, the distinguished
English essayist, critic and poet, is the
author of "A London Contrast," oneof
the most delightful papers which The
Smart Set has ever printed. The poetry
is of that excellence which readers have
eome to expect in this magazine, and is
from such favorite verse-writers as
Archibald Sullivan, Theodosia Gar
rison, Edward Wilbur Mason, Richard
Duffy, Martha Gilbert D. Bianchi, John
Vance Cheney and BeatriceSt. George.
ROMANCE OF A HAT.
The following pocm, verbatim, was
?vu ?ccomPany>"? a lady's very
styhsh hat in one of many empty fish
'Vjrrels shipped from Boston, Mass., to
W. B. Northern, at Bellows & Squires*
factory, Ocran, Lancaster county.
SHE WON'T COME BACK.
A year ago last summer,
As I road into town,
I meet a charming maiden,
Her name was Susie Brown.
I got an introduction
And invited her to ride,
And I thought I had a fortune
As she sat by my side.
Her cheeks were read as roses,
She had a dimple in her chin,
She could trip the light fantastic
And cut the Pigeon Wing.
Her dress was very stylish,
She wore this pretty Hat,
And when she promised to be mine
My heart went pitty pat.
She wanted a swell wcdding
And a pretty weddin? dress,
Which she thought would cost a thousand
Or perhaps a little baa.
I ordered the automobile
To drive her into town,
And gave her the thousand dollars
To go and buy thegown.
She said I was a jewcl
And handed me this hat,
She said, "darling," I will soon return,
And patted me on the back.
But she has'nt returned or written.
And I am beginning to feel blue,
And now to drowned my troubles
I send this Hat to vou.
And now my southern sisters,
If you desire to try it,
Just put it on and go to town
And perhaps some fool will buy it.
For further information concerning
this Hat inquireof Geo. E. Cook, Rootal
Ferry, N. H.
soivieIotes
Of Interest to Truckers, Farmers
and StocK Raisers.
Tlie crop of caterpillars is large this
year and nuuiy are applying the torch
to rid thernselves of them. Instead of
burning them out and thus injuring
the trees, on the authority of a prom
inent citizen of the county, the better
way to kill them is to put a few drops
of kerosene in their nests early in the
morning. ?Peninsula Enterprise.
The Journal of the board of Agricul
ture, published in London, recently
gave a rcmedy for treating gapes by
the fumes of corbolic acid, which is
reported to be a success. The chicks
to be treated are placed inabasket over
a pail containing corbolic acid in which
a hot brick is placed for the purpose
of volatilizing the acid. It would not
be unwise to begin with mild solutions
of the acid, increasimr its strength in
successive experiments.
TO KEEP THE HORSE HEALTHY.
An unthrifty condition of a horse is
frequently due to sharp edges on the
grindingteeth. which prevents mastica
tion of the food. Have these filed off.
Imperfect chewing may be partly a
habit, and the horse must be specially
cared for to overcome it. Nail a four
inch strip at the top of the manger so
that he can not throw out his hay, and
sprinkle the grain through it so that he
will be compelled to eat the grain slowly.
Feed whole grain seperately from
ground feed. Sometimes no other
treatment than the foregoing is needed
to restore a horse to good condition.
The addition of a pint of oilmeal to the
ration is a help. ?Farm Journal.
SALT FOR DAIRY COWS.
Extensive tests and investigations
have been made by the experiment sta
tions to determine the advisability of
adding salt to the ration of dairy cows.
As a result of these trials, it is recom
mended that dairy cows be given at
least one ounce of salt per day. Ex
ceptionally heavy milkers will require
more than this. The uniform results
obtained with all cows employed in
these trials indicate that salt in addi
tion to that obtained in their food is
absolutely essential to the continued
health of a dairy cow while producing
milk. It is evident, moreover, that the
amount of salt which must be supplied
directly will greatly vary in different
localities, it being more at high eleva
tions and at places remote from the
sea.
TEMPERANCE NOTES.
The "dry" ticket won by 17majority
in the election at Shenandoah, Page
county, Friday of last week.
Emma Blackbum, a white woman
about thirty-five years old, was found
dead in a chair in her room in Richmond
Monday morning. She was last seen
alive at six o'clock the evening before,
at that time being uuder the influence
of whiskey.
A concerted mov*e is being made by
the ladies in Washington against the
use of wine at dinners, and the punch
bowl at receptions, and the leaders have
every eonfulenee in their ultimate suc
Mrs. J. B. Henderson, whose
aversion to punch and wine is well
known, goes further and eliminates
meat from her menu. She is working
hard to make the use of intoxicants un
fashionable, and is really at the headof
the movement.
"The Anti-Saloon League is not a
mob of long-haired fanatics, as some of
the writers and speakers connected
with our business have declared, but is
a strongly centralized organization, of
ficered by men of unusual ability, finan
ciered by capitalists with long purses,
subscribed to by hundreds of thousands
of men, women and children, who are
solicited by their various churches,
advised by well-paid attorneys of great
ability, and it is working with definite
ideas to guide it in every state, county
city, and precinct."-Bonford's Wine
and Spirit Circular.
For rigid political morality suggestive
of old time New Fngland, one must go
South. One after another the New
Fngland states have tried prohibition
in the shape of state-wide laws, and
finding the experiment a failure, all
have given it up. save Maine, where it
still stands, but with great and growing
disfavor. Meanwhile prohibition in the
shape of local option is rapidly covering
the South, and Governors of states and
many other influential citizens, in and
out of office, are tcctotalers. There is
a more general prevalance of extrcme
temperance sentiment, of total absti
nencesentimentinthe South today than
anywhere elsc in the country. In the
East, North and Wcst, as in the South
there is much less of drunkenncss than
there was only a few years ago; but
outside of the South there has been a
great decrease of opposition to well
regulated drinking saloons. ? Washmg?
ton Post. '
Offall tii<- fraKaOaotooiotB Baa loot,
Tlmt jrrow on bush or tree.
i wouid k\\ e up the aholoaat eoaa
l'"i BoHOOaflaawky Moutihiin'IVa.
H. OL Sati-leis. White Stone; K. ('. Ri.hjnd
sou. Kilmnrnock.
EXPOSITION NOTES.
Old Liberty Bell will be removed from
Philadelphia to the Exposition grounds
July 15th.
Tomorrow (Saturday) noon will see
the grand opening parade on Norfolk's
streets, free, of the wild west and wild
animal arenas.
The "Mcthodist," the canoe owned
by Joshua Thomas, the famous "Parson
of the Islands," now over one hundred
years old, will be on exhibition at the
Jamestown Exposition, together with
pictures showing scenes in his life.
Officers of Admiral Evans' fleet are
mildly excited over the fact that had
Ilayti been rcpresented in the interna
tional fleet it would have been by a flag
ship in command of a vice-admiral, who
is squat and fat and as black as a black
eat. And, as a vice-admiral, he would
have received precedence over ?11
others.
Mail, whether ordinary or registered,
intended for delivery at the Jamestown
Exposition should be addressed to Ex?
position Station, Norfolk, Va., and not
to Jamestown, there being a postoffice
of the latter title distant from Norfolk
and the Exposition grounds. Care
should be exercised in this matter to
avoid annoying delays.
After taking the first of the series of
races, the Americans have been clean
cut out. The second important day
was won by the Auatrians, British
second and Americans third. The great
day, Monday, three of the four races
were won by the Italian seamen, with
the Americans way down the list. The
fourth race was given the American
rowers because their boat was accident
ally fouled by the Italians.
Gov. Swansonandhiswife, the official
host and hostess for Virginia at the
Jamestown Exposition, areanticipating
a trying summer. The Governor will
spend probably half his time at the Ex?
position, meeting and greeting the vari
ous organizations who will make the
Exposition an excuse for holding their
annual gatherings in this State. He
will alternate between Norfolk and
Richmond throughout the summer,
meeting his oflicial engagements on the
fly. Mrs. Swanson will extend the
courtesies of the State to the many de
legations of women, who will visit the
Exposition, and officiate at receptions
and other formal entertainments.
An invitation has been extended the
Virginia Press Association to visit the
famous "101 Ranch" during thecoming
convention of the editors June 10-12.
The "101 Ranch," with its Wild West
annex and its complement of over 500
cowboys, cowgirls, Indians and Mexi
cans, is now being moved from Bliss,
Okla., to the Exposition Grounds. A
spectacular Wild West performance will
be given the editors in an amphitheatre,
which has a seating capacity of 18,000
and they will also be entertained with a
barbecue, prepared in genuine Western
style by the cowboys and ranchmen.
The barbecue will follow a tour of the
Ranch and the performance in the am
Convalescents need a large amount of nourith? ?>
ro^nt in easily digested form.
Scott's Emutsion is powerful nourish
ment?highly concentrated.
It makes bone, blood and muscle without
putting any tax on the digestion.
ALL DRUGGISTS; 50c. AND $I.OO.
Established In 1802.
C. S. SCHERMERHORN &, SON,
Recelvers, Shlpperi, Dealers,
GRAIN, 1IAY, MILL FBED8, 8EED OAT8, LlNsEEU MEAL,
COTTON 8EED MEAL, GLUTEN FEED.
Also Distrlbutora of
THE PUR1NA POULTKY FEED8,
127 and 129 Cheapside, (Near prou streeu BALTIMORE, MD.
phitheatre. A herd of thirty-five buf
falo representing one-tenth of the buf
falo, now living, and a large drove of
long-hom steers are features of the
live-stock exhibit.
Admiral Evans, a Virginian, has prom
ised Governor Swanson that Virginia
day shall be the occasion of a great
naval exhibition. "I will see that Vir?
ginia is honored by the navy the 12th
of June," said the Admiral. Governor
Swanson will eome into the Roads on
board the Virginia State yacht Commo
dore Maury, flying the flag of the Chief
Executive of the State. A Governor's
salute of seventeen guns fired by the
various American and foreign war-ships
will welcome His Excellency, who will
steam down the line in review and re
ceive the foreign and American officers
on board his yacht. On landing, the
Governor will be received by President
Tucker and the officials of the Exposi?
tion, together with the army and navy
officers stationed there, after which he
will deliver an address at Lee Parade
and review the troops and marines.
Artlst luot no troublc in seeuriny mudcls.
The famous OBBOtaM have diacarded corwtd
sind huvc BocoaBB modcls in faec and form
*Ma tnkinjf Hollister's Ibxky Mountain tea.
? centa, Tea or Tablots. Ellis C. Kichanl
son. Kilmarnwk: H. M. Sandtrs, White Stone.
AFROAMERICAN NOTES.
We are glad to report Mrs. M. E. F.
Henton, of White Stone, is able to
move around the house on crutches, af?
ter being confined to her room fornearly
three weeks, caused by a bad sprain.
James Lee and Mrs. Nathaniel Nick
ens, both of Kilmarnock, were married
recently.
Mrs. Annie Dixon, near Kilmarnock,
after a long illness, died recently and
was buried at old St. John cemetery.
Tom Johnson and family, of Kilmar?
nock, wereguests of Clarence Beacham,
at Merry Point, recently.
Mrs. Ora Morris and sister. MissLot
tie Wiggins, of White Stone, were
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Solomon Raney,
at Tombs, recently.
Isaac Parks and family, of Tombs,
have moved into their new residence
just completed.
Jerry Thomas, of Eastern Branch, is
in Baltimore this week on business.
Mrs. Pauline Edwards, of Eastern
Branch, was last week inFairfields look
ing after the interest of the order of
Galilean Fishermen, at Edwardsville.
Among the sick we note: Charle#
Fisher, Mrs. Martha Wright, Mrs.
Dorathy Granson, of Irvington; Mrs.
Maggie Beane, Miss Ada Green and
Henry Bascoe, of Tombs.
Miss Pauline Smith, of Baltimore,
is visiting her parents at Tombs.
Rev. Carey Nelson, of Lively,
preach for the True Reformers on Sun?
day at the Samaritan Hall, near old St.
John. R. H. H.
Arlington Grove Fountain, No. 1254,
G. U. 0. of True Reformers, celebrated
their anniversary at Beulah Baptist
church Sunday. Rev. D. Tucker was
speaker.
Miss Mary Curry has returned to
Philadelphia after spending two weeks
at her old home at Nuttsville.
John Weaver, of upper Lancaster,
died Monday of last week from kidney
trouble, after only a f ew hours sickness.
Beulah Baptist church choir. at a
regular rehersal last week voted Miss
Emma Ellett, teacher at Newtown,
their thanks in behalf of the church and
presented her with a purse of $10 for
her faithful service as organist while
in that vicinity. H. C. R.
Without
Alcohol
A Strong Tonic Without Alcohol
A Body Buildcr Without Alcohol
A Blood Purifler Without Alcohol
A Great Alterative Without Alcohol
A Doctor's Medicine Without Alcohol
Ayer's Sarsaparilla Without Alcohol
\/?ijers
We publi.h our formulu
_ \V? b*/ii?h nlcohol
from our lnodioinea
W? urtre you to
co.iault your
doctor
Ayer's Pills are liver pills. They act
directly on the liver, make more bile
secreted. This is why they are so valu
ible in constipation, biliousness, dys
sick-headache. Ask your doctor
knows a better laxative pill.
?a by tho J. C. Ayar Co.. Lowoll, Bai.~
pepsia
f ne k
Rncourage home enterprise and buy your
lumberof W. H. Jeaae, Lltwalton. Lancaster
Co. Materlal the beat, prloea low, bis f roijrht*
*aved.
TO MERCHANTS, CANNERS
AND BOAT OWNERS:
Buy yonr coal oll, gasolloe oll,
and lubricatlug oils from us. We
guarantee full measure, and low
estwholesale prices. Large ware
house and complete stock. We
pay cash for empty oll barrels.
W. A. DAMERON k BRO.,
Agent Standard Oll Co.,
Weems. Va.
PROFESSIONAL..
J)R. O. H. OLIVER,
RESIDENT DENTIST,
IRVINGTON, . . VIRGINIA
(Office over Bank.)
.Apnolntments ?hould **> mado aeverai d?*.
NltrousOxideOasadminiHter"! C B,Ve?
.~ . 2 S5"*\,7 ?'ippend work when neeciw*r?
to v ? n ?rs: ' a- m'to > J>- m- SSfSffp, n,.
froifafer*' "?*Pt ?" fredue-da,.. Wo
Terrna: Strictly casb.
? ???????!
OENTIST AT KILMAILNOCK.
I will be at Reedville to
practicedentistrythefiist
Monday iu each month.
r? . , remalning two weeks
Rcst of time will be !t Kllmarnock
?HmT^?d bJid% work? ?Pccialtlea. Ga?*
adminlstered. Oflicelnbank.
R. W. Palmkk, Dentlst.
W. T. MAYO,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Hagub, Va.
H. B- CI1ASE,
8UHVEYOR,
KILMARNOCK, VA.
\yARNER BALL,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Monaskon, Lancaster Co., Va.
.dTo,,1,,l!KtuCne,,,ene.,l,, th? ?OUrt* ot th" ??
ITomptattentionirlvo. to all Jeg-albualneaa.
W.?.?ATUAWAT. R.O.NORR.MH.
HATHAWAY * NORRiS,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
Offickb: White Stone and Lively, Va.
Wi!| be at Lively Mondaya. Tuea
w hite stoue oillce all other days.
\\T# McDONALD LEE,
(NOTART PUBL1C.)
CIFILENttlNEERANDSLRYEYOR
IKVINGTON. VA.
gggjs^a gjj?r,.Ta .?,
F. L. GRANDY.
4* KOAKOKE SIJUABE,
NORFOLK, VA.
Will furnlah you
Grain, Hay, Mill-Feed,
Peas, Etc,
Of the best gradea. Rappahannock
trade supplied at rock-bottom pricea.
MONUMENTS AND GRAVESTONES.
To all who con
template the erec
tion of a Monu?
ment, Statue or
(Jraveatone in Mar?
ble or Granite, it
will be to their
interest to call on
or address
LAWSON & NEWTON,
Cor. 11th and Williams Sta.,
NORFOLK, - VA.
Bell 'Pnone No. S752.
VIRGINIA FIRE & MARINE
INSURANCE COMPANY.
CHARTERED 1832.
RiCHWOND.VA.
Aaoetav - - $750,500.
WM. H. PALMER, Preot.
WM. H. McCARTY, Secr
We do the moat popular lnaurance
hnainea8 in the State. When your
bouseburna you get your money.
B. H. BAIRD, Agenf
WARSAW. VA.
BRICK! ERIC?! BRICK!
Tbe place to bny Brick Ia at
LEVIN T. BUCE & CO'S.,
Weems, Va.,
Manufacturera of
all gradea of
PftVING AND BUILDING 8RICKS.
We can deliyer Brick to
any point on water front.
?T*T?1 Mifler'a
Liver Pills" Theyc?re
1 bc B?yi a Uz a t ?!! Dra? Storu aad Cooatn StdVM

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