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Virginia citizen. (Irvington, Va.) 1891-1921, June 07, 1907, Image 1

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VOLUME XVI.
Weekly Journal Devoted 10 the Interesis of Lancastei Cctnty ir Particular; tlie Northern Neck and Bappahannock Valley ui General, and the World at Large
IRVLNGTON, VIRGINIA, FRIDAY, JUNE^Tl907.
NUMBER 36
CHAS. M. STRUVEN & CO.,
(Formerly with Struven & Wacker)
STEAMSHIP, FACTORY
AND
MACHINISTS' SUPPLIES.
WHOLESALE
QROCERS AND
SHIP CHANDLERS.
Brokers and Commission
Merchants For
MENHADEN FISH SCRAP
AND FISH OIL.
114 S. FREDER1CK STREET., BALTIMRE, MD.
ABENAQUffSl^1"
ARE UNEXCELLED FOR FARM WORK,
2 lo 18 Horse-power Ponabie anu Staiionary Engines,
RIANUFACTUKKI) BV
ABENAQUE MACHINE WORKS,
WESTMINSTER STATION, VT
C/V rALOCUE M.
0. B iVNDIFF 1 CO.. Lively, VA.. Asents.
BUFFALO GASOLINE MOTORS
FOR
2 TO 4<) HORAfl POWI1U.
CHESAPEAKE LAUNCH AND MOTOR CO., A'g'ts.,
brook AVE., NORFOLK, VA.
SFSU FOR CATAI.dCl'K.
SPEGIAL OFFER OF GASOLINE ENGINES.
We have several 14 horse-power Buffulo Gasoline Motore, laat
*eur'u model, with this year'a improvements, right from factory,
which we offer for prompt aoceptance at $500, installed iD boat.
FRANK T. GLARK GOMPANY, LTO.,
Sash, Doors and Blinds,
Hardware, Paints, Varnishes,
Window and Door JScreens.
i'oliahed IMate and Window Glaau, Mantels, Tilea and Gratea.
Huilding Material Generally. Eatimatee cheerfully given.
FRANK T. CLARK CO., Ltd.,
96-98 BRODKE AVENUE._NORFOLK, VIRGINIA.
MONUMENTS AND GRAVESTONES.
/*
We pay the frclght, and
guarantee aafe dellvery.
f'! , Largest Stock in the South.
llluatratcd Catalogae Free.
Kstubliehed 1848.
jj THE COUPER MARBLE WORKS,
159, 161 and 163 Bank StM NORFOLK, VA.
SASH, DOORS, BLINDS,
MA.NTELS. HARDWARE,
WINDOW AND DOOR SGREENS,
MILL WORK OP ALL KINDS.
C. A. NASH & SON,
Opposite Postoffice. NORFOLK, VA.
THE HAWKS-MAUPHIN CO.,
SASH, MANTELS, PAINTS, BUILDING
DOORS, TILING, OILS, PAPERS,
BLINDS, GRATES, GLAS3, . VARNISHES,
MOULDINGS, BRACKETS, ETC.
115-117 HIGH STREET, PORTSMOUTH, VA.
THE GREAT POLICY-HOLDERS' CO.
9-1. Why ifl 1t that the Union CcntraJ, while lta preminma are Iow can nav
? the largest dividendsr
lat. Beciuse the company ts cholce in selectlng Ita rlaks. Conaequence- a
ow dcath rate.
2nd. Becauae for twenty yeara lt haa realized the highest lnterest rate
*f_2. With what reault?
? We furnlah maxiraum Inaurance at minlmnm cost.
Before taking Llfe Inaurance wrlte for ratca ln the great Pollcy-holder
Company. '
(O. P. PALMER and R H. NORRIS, Kllmarnock, Va.
Agenclet:-? A. C. BALL, Moluak, Va.
( M. S. STRINOFELLOW, Brandy, Va.
FIGHT BATTLES OVER AGA1N.
Great Confederate Reunion at Richmond Fraught
With Tcars, Smiles, Handclasps and
Thrice-Told Talcs.
GOOD FELLOWSHIP, GOOD FEELING, GOOD BEHAVIOR AND A
GENERAL GOOD TIME.?INCIDENTS V1VIDLY PICTURED.
Far exceeding the wildest hope of
the local committees, the army of Con
federate veterans which reached Rich
mond numbered fully 10,000 men, and
with the forty or fifty thousand of
others who accompanied them the
seventeenth reunion of United Confed?
erate Veterans exceeds all others in the
history of the organization.
Writors of facts and faction delight
bo say and sing "of the thin prey line
which is fading slowly away," but to
those privilcged to watch the many
commands of old soldiers which in
vaded Richmond the grey line seems
anything but thin, and the cvidences
of fading away aiv entirely lacking.
It was a sight to stir the blood and
warm the heart?those bands of vet
rans marching once more along the
streets of the city which was long ago
the capitol of the Confederacy.
The old soldiers, gay as lads and full
of fireand enthusiasm, marehed with a
swing, cheering and crying aloud the
"rebel ycll," greeting old friends and
quickly making new ones, going over
ajrain the stirring times of war, re
eounting deeds of valor, and recalling
memories of campfire and battlefield.
For three days streams of people
poured out of the train sheds at the
three principal depots of Richmond.
From the far South crowds of people
came in on special trains at all hours,
severai trainloads from the far Wost.
from Kentucky, Missouri, Tcxas. Okla
homa, Indian Territory, Arkansaw and
even Montana and California.
Missouri had a dclegation of Veterans,
Sons, Daughters and friends more than
a thousand strong, and Kentucky and
Tennessee each seemed to cqual Mis?
souri. The Memphis sponsors and ladics
were voted the most boautiful contingent
? next to Virginia, of coursc.
The Forrest Cavalry Corps was ac?
companied by a trio of Sponsors and
half a dozen Maids of Honor which
filled a touring car. The costumes and
dteontlOM were the most striking in
the whole parade. Possibly the trio of
sponsors were the most beautiful trio
over scen on Virginia soil. In fact,
next to the stirring sight of old heroes,
many legless and armless, the bower of
beauty which accompanied them in car
riages and on horsebaek reccived such
applause as has not been heard from
Southern throats since the days when
Lee or Jackson would ride before the
victorious ranks of Southern chivalry.
All this occurred on Thursday, the
first day and the big parade day. The
weather was beautiful. The hoavy
rains and eold weather of Friday and
Saturday obviated all out-doordisplays,
but the hotels, banquet hall, auditoriums
and public places were fillcd and each
had an occasion of splendid interest.
Owing to the inclement weather many
returned to their homes in the far South
but a large majority remained for the
greatest day, Monday of this week, and
many thousands more came in Sunday
and Monday.
Five thousand old vets were accom
modated in tents at Camp Gordon.
They had abundance to eat and camp
fires were going all the time, but the
sleeping under canvas in the rain, we
fear, will produce many casualties.
Richmond has never been called upon
to handle such a crowd. This was the
greatest reunion ever held or that ever
will be held in the South beeause of the
"lost cause."
"No city has ever before been so
brilliantly decorated for a Confederate
Reunion." This was the expression of
Commander Stephen D. Lee.
Noted (.enerals Thoro.
No feature of the great parade Thurs?
day attracted more attention than the
presence of a number of distinguished
generals of the Confederate States
Army. General Stephen D. Lee and
some others were in the saddle, but
the majority were in private carriages
f urnished by patriotic residents of Rich?
mond. So far as can be ascertained the
following is a list of them:
Lieutenant-General Stephen D. Lee,
of Mississppi.
Lieutenant-General Simon Bolliver
Buckner, of Kentucky.
Major-General E. P. Alexander, of
Tennessee.
Major-General Pinckney D. Bowles, of
Florida.
Major-General George P. Harrison,
of Alabama.
Major-General M. C. Butler, of
South Carolina.
Major-General William L. Cabell, of
Texas.
Major-General William McComb, of
Virginia.
Major-General William R. Cox, of
Virginia.
Major-General Marcus T. Wright,
of District of Columbia.
Major-General Samuel G. French, of
New Jersey.
Major-General L. L. Lomax, of
Pennsylvania.
Brigadier-General R. I). .Tohnson,
of Alabama.
Brigadier-General Richard M. Gano,
of Texas.
Brigadier-General T. M. Logan, of
Virginia.
Brigadier-General George W. Gordon,
of Tennessee.
Brigadier-General Eppa Hunton, of
Virginia.
Brigadier-General Thomas T. Mun
ford, of Virginia.
Brigadier-General Clement A. Kvans,
of Georgia.
Brigadier-General Robert Lowry, of
Mississippi.
Brigadier-General W. P. Roberts, of
North Carolina.
One of the nattiest Confederate of
Seefl was Mrs. George Miltenberger,
of St. Louis, Mo., aid-de-camp and as
sistant surgeon-General on the staff of
General Stephen D. Lee. In her per
fectly-ritting suit of fine Confederate
uniform, specially designed and fashion
ed with the oflicial insignia of the wearer
as tostars. braid and buttons; with grey
sklrt, plumedhat,crimson silken sash and
military bootsof patent leather, Colonel
Miltenberger made a brilliant figure as
she rode in the procession or galloped
back and forth along the ranks carrying
orders, Mrs. Miltenberger was a Con?
federate matron who did noble service
at the spinning wheel and as a scout.
Oregon, Montana, California, and
nearly every state of the West; Ohio,
New York and several other Northern
States had reprcscntatives.
So:np Pallntic Sightg.
The lino of maivh was overtwo miles
long, hwffanlng at the city hall and ex
tending to the- Stuait v.-il-d statue in
west Richmond. Governor Swansim,
mounted on an imported black stallion,
niadea superb picture and was loudly
cheored.
In the ranks were men like Lieu
tenant-Governor Ellyson, Judge Mann
and Attorney-General Anderson, march
ing side by side with some tattered
clothed vcteran. Many of these latter
were clad in the old grey suit or the
brown homespun pea-jacket which had
last served them at Appomattox, with
Joseph E. Johnston in South Carolina
or with Kirby Smith in the Southwest.
A Georgian, with his brown home?
spun displayed one arm sloevoless and
the bullet rent which had carried away
the member. Eyeless, legless, and
armless men in numbers showed what
humanity could stand and sutfer for a
cause so dear.
One worn veteran from Indian Terri
tory marehed with his wife who was
an Indian princess, once beautiful no
doubt, but now haggard and old.
Another and probably the most pa
thetic of all. and eliciting the most
applause in the parade, was a South
Carolina "sand-hiller." who had
marehed or rode under the Palmetto
flag with Wade Hampton. He was
minus one leg and one arm, and refused
to take a carriage, but with his crutch
and the aid of his white-haired wife,
poorly clad as he, marching by his side,
he made the two-mile journey amid the
acclaim of the assembled tens of
thousands. In his battered cap was a
miniature battle flag of the Con
federacy.
The scenes of wildest enthusiasm
would not be replete without describing
the ovation tendered a South Carolinian
who was dragged blushingly to the
stage that night by one of the noted
speakers. His name was Lipscomb,
and now resides in Texas. At the*bat
tle of the Crater, when the earth trem
bled but little more than the stout
hearts around it?when Captain Feath
erstone, commanding the company
nearest that went unscathed, and he
says his heart was thumping like a
hydraulic pump and he wished he had
no more at stake than the molly-cotton
tail that was making for the tall tim
ber?a voice from his rear piped out:
"Cap'n, may I fallinto your company?"
Turning to see who was crazy enough
to want to "fallin" when he wanted to
"fallout," he saw the blackest, gri
miest, sootiest human being to be an
Anglo-Saxon his eyes ever landed on.
Instantly recognizing one who had been
blown up, he inquired facetiously: "Hbw
far did they biow you, my man?"
"Wall, Cap'n, as I was going up I met
the company cook coming down, and he
said he would have breakfast ready gin
I got back!" The man was private
Lipscomb, the sole survivor of two
South Carolina companies that had been
blown up in the awful death hole.
Lipscomb had landed on his feet, and
his pleading remark to join Feather
stone's company was rounded off with
the remark?"I jes want ter git squar
with them d-rascals, the Yanks."
Spceches nl the Conventiou.
The first of the speakers at the Horse
Show building, where were gathered
ten thousand people, most of them those
who had worn the grey, was the
Governor of Virginia, who welcomed
the reunion to Virginia. General Boll
ing introduced the Governor. He said
the chief executive of the'State was
too young to fight in the great war, but
no man in the South is doing more to
perpetuate the memory of the brave
men who did the fighting, and no man
is doing more to have taught to
the children of the South the true
history of the great conflict. As the
son of a Confederate Veteran the Gov?
ernor thrilled his audience with en?
thusiasm and at periods it was full three
minutes before he could resume because
of the cheering, men standing on their
seats and throwing hats into the air.
Following him was the Grand Com
mander, Stephen D. Lee, a native of
South Carolina but now a resident of
Mississippi and thcranking Lieutenant
Gcneral now surviving.
The vast hall was pay with Confed
<.raU><olors, the battle flags of stars
and bars, the colors of many Southern
States and the pictures of Lee, Davis
Jackson and Stuart adoming the walls
The band played "Dixie,"that inspiring
air which has power to stir North and
South alike, and a wild "rebel yell"
shook the rafters.
Equally eloquent and admirable as
the Governor's were the words of Gen
eral Lee. He brought a blush of pride
to the cheek of every Virginian when
he said: "The oftener we pay you a
visit the more we like you. Every
true Southerner either claims to come
from Virginia or to have some relative
there. It is a sort of American patent
of nobility. When the Confederate
soldicr comes to Richmond, it is a
homecoming. The grcatest of F.ng
land's Queens said that when her heart
should be opened, upon it would be
found written the word 'Calais'; in
every Confederate heart, 'Richmond' is
written forever. Here stand the Capi
tol and the White Houseof the Confed
eracy. Yonder is the statue of our
great commander, a tribute from the
genius of France to the glorious man
hood of Virginia. Hcre is Stonewall
Jackson in immortal bronze, a mem
orial by English gentlcmen to the
soldicr of God and his country. Hen\
too, is A. P. Hill, who gave his native
land a soldier's finished service and yet
to whom, also, the glory of a patriot's
death was not denied."
It was, however, his closing words
which sent a thrill through the au
dience and unloosed the rebel yell. Gen
eral Lee had spoken of the pros
perity of the South and of the great
and noblo men who had made her his
tory. With voice raised loud and clear
and with dramatic gesture, he ex
olaimed:
"The blossom upon our human troe
is once more bursting into bloom, and
we old soldiers, living in the past as we
must, are made glad by the reverence
and respect shown to us. We are
happy and rejoice that we have the
affoction and gratitude of the Southern
pcople. We gather our sons and grand
sons around us, and they listen with
thrilling hearts to the glorious story of
the Confederacy. They ride with Stuart
and Hampton and Forrest, and they
march with Jackson, Cheatham and
Hood. They listen to the thunder of
IVlham's guns. They bear in their
arms the body of Ashby. They listen
for the.hoofbcats of "Traveler:" they
hear the shout "Lee to the rear!" and
then the rebel yell rings in their ears
and above the storm of battle until they
almost catch the wild joy of the soul
and even share in the rapture of the
charge."
After the applause ha<1 suhsidod his
comrades urged him to "go on" "go
on," but his message had been given.
Not the least interesting partof Gen
eral Lee's remarks were his allusions
to the kindly feeling which existed
between the North and South, and it is
remarkable that almost at the same
hour, in the city of Indianapolis, Presi
dent Roosevalt told the same story to
the men in blue in these words:
"You have left a country so gen
uinely reunited that ail of us now, in
whatever part of this Union we live,
have a right to feel the keenest pride,
not only in the valor and self-devotion
of you, the gallant men who wore the
blue, but also in the valor and self
devotion of your gallant opponents
who wore the grey.''
At the Unveiling.
In the march to the unveiling of the
statue of "Jeb" Stuart, a magnificent
bronze equestrian one, the Stonewall
Brigade, Stuart's cavalry, Mosby'smen
Pickett's remnants and Mahone's legion
all came in for waves of applause.
Thousands of others, individually and
collectively, also shared the thundous
applause. Veterans from the Nor
thern Neck, the "Outside Row,"
were few in comparison, but they
received with the other devoted
heads the encores of the thronged
streets of the parade.
It was commented on that one gallant
army was missing, represented by only
a few individual survivors-the rem?
nants of gallant Beauregard's Palmetto
legion. They, for the most part,
have joined the hero of Bull Run and
Fort Sumter and are now resting under
the immortal palms.
The Commander-in-chief, General
Stephen D. Lee, was in the van, sup
ported by the Army of Northern Vir?
ginia, and the thunders of applause
which were not to be stilled for two
hours began in intensest volume.
At the end of the line, on the
plaza beyond the statue, a most beauti
ful feature was presented. On an in
clined platform, like a huge grand
stand, sat six hundred children, in blocks
of red, white and blue, so dressed and
arranged that they made a living Coiv
federate battle-flag.
After the parade and after the speech
of Judge T. S. Garnett, of Norfolk, a
member of Stuart's staff, the veil was
unloosed by a grand-daughter of Lee's
cavalry leader, amid the booming of
hundreds df cannons and the acclaims
of enthusiastic thousands. The cannon
made the uninitiated wince and stop
thair mn, but old soldierssaiditcaused
their blood to tingle and they for the
instant were awaiting to once more
hear the commands of Lee, or Jack
son, or Stuart ring forth.
After the ceremonies the concourse
marehed to Hollywood and there deco
rated in sweet sentiment and bathed
with tears the graves covering the
heroes that haveshaken off earth's toils.
Speeches and Itecentlons.
On Friday, as stated, convention halls
and other places reverberated with
speeches, song and dance. Senator
John W. Daniel moved to tears the old
soldiers before him when recounting
incidents of the great strife. But it
was left toCol. "Bob" Lee, the grand
son of their immortal chieftain. to turn
pandemonium loose. The session of the
convention was broken up by the old
fellows who crowdedaround Col. Lee to
grasp the hand of tho young representa
tive of the housc of Lee. His oration
was splcndid. "The speech made today
by Robert E. Lee was the greatest and
most patriotic address ever deliveredat
a Confederate reunion." was the com
mentof Gen. Stephen D. Lee, thepres
ent Commander-in-Chief.
The singing of war songs by the flve
hundrcd children of the public schools
of Richmond, all clad in spotless white
forming'a pyramid behind the grand
stand, set the veterans on fire, as did
also sight of the onlydaughter of Jeffer
son Davis, and her son and daughter.
Mrs. General Stonewall Jackson, Mrs.
General J. E. B. Stuart, Mrs. General
William Mahone and Miss Mary Custis
Lee were at the headquarters of the
Richmond Chapter, United Daughters
of the Confederacy meeting and shak
ing hands with the veterans.
At night a most magnificent ball was
tendered tho sponsors and maids of
honor. Beautiful girls of Rich?
mond and from all parts of the
South were present ?from Lou
isiana, Alabama, Missouri, Texas,
Mississippi, Tennessee, the Caro
linas, Georgia, Maryland?each chosen
to represent her State because
of her undisputed "belleship." It was
a battle of beauty, waged with all the
daring and skill of charming women,
and ending with all the honors of war
when the fair army retired in the small
hours of the morning after fearful exe
cution and theslaughter of many hearts.
The list of casualties will never be
known; the names of the victims will
never be recorded, but those who hoard
the cries of the wounded and observed
their signals of distress will bear wit
ness that no rnan escaped without in jury,
and that many will carry their honor
able wounds to their graves ?or more
happily to a future engagement. Vete?
rans of many an engagement and more
than one disaster took courage and
bravely attempted the siege of an un
known force; but led mby the wilesof
strategy which, like the poet, is "bora,
not made" in woman, fell an easy prey
to the battery of smiles, supported by
volleys of infantry fires from eyes
trained to deadly execution. In the
langu age of the gentleman who wrote
Latin books for unwilling students?
1 'They came, they saw, they conquered,''
and with a "mere glance of the eye,"
according to Beau Brummel. What a
sight it was ! The old warriors, not one
of whom but had seen hissixtieth birth
day, andsomc whoconfessed to seventy
five yeare of perennial youth; the wo?
men, daughters and granddaughters of
the cavaliers, who never grow too old
to forsake the delights of chivalry.
Probably the most noticed was the
bevy of beautiful girls from Memphis,
Tenn., who enacted the Southern Cross
Drill. This drill was devised by Lieu
tenant Dugan, of South Carolina, while
a prisoner at Johnson's Island with
3,000 of his comrades. The veterans,
all inuniform, and the seventeen young
ladies all in white, wearing the Con?
federate stars and bars as a corsage,
were greeted with a great burst of ap
plause, for the "Drill" has become a
part of the program of every reunion,
and is the entertainment which most
delights the veterans from every section
of the South.
Union Soldier Addregses Vets.
"I extend to you, one and all, the
cordial greetings and best wishes pos
sible from the surviving soldier in blue
to his camrade in gray, and I long for
the coming of the day when we will
gather together in Washington, and on
bended knee, under the shadow of the
monument of that greatest of all Vir
ginia's soldiers, the immortal Washing?
ton, pledge ourselves and our children's
children to the upbuilding and uphold
ing of the greatest nation that ever
existed on earth."?Colonel J. M.
Schoonmaker, Federal Veteran, in ad
dVess at Lee Camp.
Colonel Schoonmaker is of Pittsburg,
Pa., and isthe Federal ofticer who was
with a raid down the Valley of Virginia
during the war, and, when they reached
Lexington, Colonel Schoonmaker re
ceived orders to burn the Virginia Mili
tary Institute. He refused to obey,
saying that he had not enlisted in the
army to make war on institutions of
leaming or to destroy property not con
trabandof war. For his action Colonel
Schoonmaker was afterwards court
marshalled, and has since come into
- Consumption is less deadly than it used to be.
SCertain relief and usually complete recovery
will result from the following treatment:
?}? Hope, rest, fresh air, and?Soott'sf
Y Etmiljrion.
X ALL DRUGCISTS: 60c. AND $1.00.
Establlahed ln 1802.
C. S. SCHERMERHORN & SON,
Recelvers, Shippera, Dealera,
OKAIN, I1AY, MILL FEEDS, 8EED OAT8, LIN8KE1> MKAL,
COTTON 8EEI> WKAL, OLUTEN FEEI>.
Also Diatrlbutora of
THE PUKINA POULTRY FEED8,
127 and 129 Cheapside, (**???? prau sueeto BALTIMORE MD.
considerable prominence as a champion
of the cause of the South. It also de
veloped that he had likewise refused to
burn the towns of Lewisburg and Boyd
ville in West Virginia, and caused his
soldiers to salute the grave of Stone?
wall Jackson in Lexington. He is the
guest of General Stephcn D. Lee, at
the Jefferson Hotel.
While this was going on an unusual
honor was bcing bcstowed upon Dr.
James H. Reed at Battle Creek, Mich.,
who made the Federal Memorial Day
address. The doctor, an ex-Con
foderate, has been made an honor
ary member of the very regiment he
fought against the hardest. During the
Civil War, Dr. Reed. with the Four
teenth Mississippi, participated in the
battle of Thompson's Station, Tenn.,
which the Southerners called the battle
of Spring Hill. In this engagement
Reed's regiment captured the Nine
teenth Michigan, which has now
adopted him as an honorary member.
Another illustration of the goodly
feeling pervading the country was the
recent passage by Congress, at the re
quest of President Roosevelt and Sec
retary Root, an appropriation of
#200,000 for the care of graves of Con
federates in Northern cemeteries.
CONTINUED ON SECOND PAGE.
"GRIS" QUEST10NS THE PEDAGOG.
Mr. Editor:?Asyou may have access
to a cyclopedia, will you please tell us
what the term plus and minus means
as applied to modern arithmetic. Our
little Kid asked us what it meant and
we called for her book. We looked all
through her book and couldn't find the
words plus and minus. She said Teach
er told her cross marks and dashes were
plus and minus. When we were im
bibing young ideas we were instructed
in good United States English that
they meant to add to and to take from.
or "and" and "from", or, in semi
dago, addition and subtraction. Now
as plus and minus had a dago sound we
hunted a dago book, viz.: Dante's In
ferno. In one of his Cantos he men
tions?"There Minos stands"?, and
in another he sees Plutus, another dago
devil. Now as Dante was a dago mis
anthrope of the first magnitude, and
knowing the modern education's prone
ness to pedantry, we came to the con
clusion that plus (or Plutus) and minos
are terms borrowed from the dead dago
language to tangle the young idea in ita
shooting. So we told our little Kid
that they were two imaginary Latin
devils and any one who would make use
of them to teach an infant figures was
some sort of a United States-uv-ver
crank. Gris.
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many aumroationa for decorationa, gaiuea and
rcfreshments suitablo foraftemoonaud even
iiifc* partiea, also 33 guessing- gimes with
answers.
"What to 8crv? and How tu Pr?p?r? It,"
is a companion book of tho above. and con
taiiiAntSrooeiptsforSandwithes.SaladH.Cakoa
and Cukolcts, Drinks and Ioes. Caudy, and
Lunubeou Dishus. besldesacollectionof toasta
and quotatlons, menus and euffgestions aa to
what to serve on different oecasions.
Pritc uach, 25c, orsend postal for further
nartuulurs, togethcr with our booklot, tcllinic
liow to make papc>r tiowors, which we send
KKHK on request. Homc Entcrtainraent
Uureau, 150-1&2 N. Trumbull Avenue, Chicaa-o.
TO MERCHANTS, canners
AND B0AT 0WNERS:
Buy yonr coal oil, gaaollne oil,
aod lubricattng olls from us. We
guaranlee full meaaure, and low
eat wholesale pricec. Large ware
house and complete stock. We
pay caah for empty oil barrela.
W. A. DAMERON A BRO.,
Agent Standard Oil Co.,
Weema. Va.
SHOPPINO FOR LAD1E8.
Save traveling expenaca and have > our
ahopplng done by In.J. P. Meaniey,
ItOi Oak St.. Baltimore. She ia in
close touch with the beat atores and can
aave onr ladlea money on their punchaaea
ln all llnea. It coata them nothingrextra.
Samplea aent upon request.
PROFESSIONAL,.
?)tt. G. H. OLIVER,
RESIDENT DENTIST,
IRVINGTON, - - VIRGINIA
(Olfloe over Bank.)
Apnointmonta ahould bo made aovtraj daya
mus be l-rnkvP. duc noticc ahould bi- ?lvea
NitruusOAideGaaadmlnistered.
tjrl, *\"8ua,'y 8,,!!Pend work when neccaaarv
to tn toreltoTc tliosu who are suflVrin*.
??-"?;'*'hour8: ? *?? n>. to l r.. m., and 2:;w p. m.
rrVmitol?" "??* ?" WcdD^?aj?. ??>?>
Tcrms: Strictly casb.
DENTI8T AT KILMAUNOCK.
I w?M be at Heedvflle to
Sracticcdentistry tbefiiat
londay in each tnonth.
rcmaiuing two weeks.
Rest of timc will be at Kllmarnock,
Orown and bridge work, specialties. Gas
admlnistered. Ofiice ln bank.
R. W. Pai.mrr, Dentlet.
W. T- MAYO,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Hagub, Va. .
H. ?. CI1ASE,
8UKVEYOR,
K.ILMARNOCK, VA.
All work accurately aud promptly
doue. Plats made.
\yAKNEU BALL,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
MONASKON, LANCA8TEU C'O., V"A,
aXV.liJ^acti(HJ.in *U tho Uouru of thla and
Promptatt?ntlon jriven to all legal bualneaa.
W. ?. IIAT1IAWAT. r. 0. NOKKia. JR.
HATHAWAY t NORRiS,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
OrriCKS: White Stone and Lively, Va.
Wl!| b? at f.lvoly Monday*. Tuw
Watt* Stott* ofloe ofl otSer daya.
\y# McDONALD LEE,
(NOTAItY PUBL1C.)
CIYILENWINEERANDSLKVLVOK
IHVINGTON. VA.
mifJil,8u!Urvove^ J"1'1 P'Ht* ????. 1UU
and Vladuct worn and conatriictioiia of?U
F. L. CRANDY.
42 KOANOKE SO.UARE,
NORFOLK, VA.
Will furntab you
Qrain, Hay, Mill-Feed,
Peas, Etc,
Of the best gradea. Rappahannock
trade aapplied at rock-bottom pricea.
MONUMENTSAND GRAVESTONES.
To all who con
template the erec
tion of a Monu
ment, Statue or
Graveatoue in Mar
ble or Granite, i
will be to their
interest to call on
or address
LAWSON &, NEWTON,
Cor. 11th and Wllliams Sta.,
NORFOLK, - VA.
Bell 'Pnone No. 8 752.
VIRGINIA FIRE & MARINE
INSURANCE COMPANY.
(HARTERED 1832.
RICHMOND. VA.
Assetav - - $750,500.
WM. H. PALMER, Prest.
WM, H. McCARTY, Soc?
We do the most popular lnaurance
hnaineaa in the State. When your
bouae burna you get your money.
B. H. BAIRD, Agenr
WAB8AW.VA.
BRICK! BRICK! BRICK!
The place to bny Ilrick ia at
LEVINT.BUCK&CQ'S.,
Weems, Va.,
Manufacturera of
all gradea of
PAVING AND BUILDING 8RICKS.
We can deliver Brick to
any point on water front.
2H^Polk Miller's
LiverPills,,S2?2S
u lAcBaytabMatanDnwStorwaaJCaaatryStana

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