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The Roanoke times. (Roanoke, Va.) 1897-1977, April 23, 1897, Image 7

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Ill
of a pair of
Is about Four Hundred
miles. You can go at least
seventy-five miles better
in our
They outdo all our competitors,
and the price,
$2.98,
is where you can reach them in this life.
It is the business of our life to put
life into our business, anil the
liveliest thing we have is our
Ladies' $1.00 Oxfords.
All-solid All-Summer wearers.
Roanoke Shoe Company.
MIGRATION.
Through tho nutunm woods tin shadows grow
And widor and deeper tho streamlets flow;
No sound but the rippling waters heard,
Or tlio faint low twitter of somo lone bird.
Belated, forgotten and wondering why
His mate had deserted him?ho must lly,
Kor redo winds uro tossing the trees o'erhcjid
And scattering tho leaves of golden red
That cling us they fall to ferns pain grown.
Cream tinted, like old laeo some queen had
worn.
Ho away from this BOOlio to u cheerier ono
The loilO bird flies with tho setting sun
And rests midst the boughs of old oak trees,
Where Spanish moss swings in tin; soft, warm
breeze.
There in dreams ho forgets his snow bound
nest
Till spring comes again?then homo is best.
And with wings outspread ho wanders hence
Till ho finds the maple treu elo.se by the fence,
Where year after year hia mute and ho
Hnvo reared their brood In tho same old tree.
?12.. P. SI. in Boston Commercial.
(m THE LAVA BEDS.
In about tho year 1842 there was
born in one of the most desolate regions
of tho Union?tho lava beds that ex?
tend from northern California into
southern Oregon?an Indian girl. Her
father/was So Cot, an intractable Modoo
Rubchief, who lost bis lifo in an attack
on a party of whites emigrating to the
Pncilio coast in 1850. Along about
1857, when adventurous white men,
Hoeking gold, began to penetrate tho
Modoo lava bed region by the several
hundreds every year, there came that
way n certain young Kcntnckian, who
had been an army sergeant stationed at
the Presidio, in San Francisco. Ho was
Frank Riddle. Ho bud refreshments at
tho miserable home of tho squaw widow,
tie Cot, and soon took a fancy to her
daughter, Wi-uc-ma, then 15 years old,
und famous in that region as the best
looking nud most agreeable Indian girl
in California. Riddle got money in gold
mining in southern Oregon and soon
married the handsome. Modoo girl. Tho
conplo took up their abode near the
gold diggings, and the young wife be?
gan to learn her husband's language.
While she visited her savage brothers
and sisters occasionally and bore them
gifts she became weaned to the life and
thought of white people. But she never
dared, on pain of assassination or poison?
ing, to reveal her change of faith or to
show that she really loved a white man.
In 1800, when gold was discovered in
large quantities in the Kloninth region
mid thousands of venturesome Ameri?
cans rushed through northern California
nnd across tho lava beds, tho anger oi
the Modocs was roused to fullest pitch
by tho lawlessness of the invading
whites. In June, 1860, the Modocs lured
14 gold miners into a narrow canyon,
and there, after unspeakable cruelties,
extending over two days, let the white
men dip. Tho news of the murders by
tho Modocs got abroad a month later
and set on firo the whole white popula?
tion of northern California nud southern
Ctckon,
... . ?tffjj g baud of 75 whites loit
Yreku, (Ja)., to punish tho Modoo sav?
ages for the act. Tho avengers wero led
by Benjamin Wright, an old mountain?
eer, who had hunted and fought Indinnti
with Kit Carson, Jim Beckwith, John
Scott und Jim Bridget-. After a lonf!
chase through the rough country, which
was not productive of good results, the
chiefs were invited to moot the whites
and make a treaty. This they agreed to
do, and tho wan ing parties went into
camp near each other tin Lost river, the
Indians outnumbering the white men by
three to one. Early on the morning oi
tho conference a young Modoc squaw,
breathless, Im r clothing torn and he*
feet bleeding, camo into tho Wright
camp and usked to see tho leader. Shu
had run and walked soino nine uiileH
across tho ragged mountain trail. Hot
errand was towsiru the invaders against
treachery. The night before she learned
at the council fire, that her people in?
tended to surround tho white men dur?
ing tho conference and put them to
death. Wright and his men met cunning
with cunning. They went into ambush
near tho plucoof conference, and when
the unsuspecting Modocs fell into tint
trap but two escaped front tho slaughter
that ensued. This affair is known in tho
history of northern California as tho
Ben Wright massacre. The squaw who
conveyed the timely warning to her
white friends was Wi-ue-ma, tho wife
of Frank Riddle. This fact was never
found out by her people, else her lifo
would have been forfeited.
Eleven and ;i half years passed. The
Modocs had been Confined by the gov?
ernment to :i defined reservation, and
treaties were made with them, which
were repeatedly broken. The tribe was
the pny el' post traders, contractors and
of almost every white man who camo
in contact with it. The only one of tho
hated whites in whom the Indians had
confidence was tho lato Judge Elijah
Steele. To this man they went for coun?
sel and advice, but in tho,lapse of time
thoy cm n contemplated taking his life,
as in the Indian modo of reasoning the
death of a single white mail erases the
wrongs perpetrated by many.
Sullen at first under their injuries, tho
Modoes were awakened to fury and de?
clared vengeance on their oppressors.
The memory of any detail of the Wright
affair was never allowed to fade. At
every council Captain Jack or Scar
Faced Charley called upon the vengeful
Modoes to remember the August day
when tho palefaces had killed their fa?
thers and brothers. At last, in January,
1*7:1, the whites in northern California
knew that another Indian war was at
hand.
Shortly after hostilities began tho
government appointed a peace commis?
sioner tocbtifcr with tho rebellions red?
skins anil endeavor to make peace. In
tho meantime Riddle and other squaw
men on the reservation used their in fin- 1
eure toward a settlement of tho diffl- j
culty, but to no effect, The turbulent
wurnors lert by Captain Jack were bent
on n slaughter. When tho peaco com?
missioner arrived on tho ground, tho
Indians refused to treat with him. They
did, however, finally agrco to surrender
to Judge. Steelo aud two other men of
that region and arrunged to givo up
their arms tho following day. When
Steele und his companions wont to tho
agreed place of tho surrender, not an
Indian was in sight, and they returned
to the military camp. Steelo then agreed
to go alcuo and interview tho war chief.
Thut uight Steelo went through an ex?
perience fow men havo endured. Whilo
talking to him in pacific terms in tho
Chinook jargon they wero discussing iu
their own touguo tho advisability of
murdering their visitor. Steelo under?
stood sufficiently their language to com?
prehend his duugcr, but did not betray
his knowledge. The chiefs finally decid?
ed to sparo his lifo on condition of his
bringing tho commissioners and com?
manding officers of tho troops to confer
with them.
But for tho efforts of tho brave squaw,
Wi-ne-ma, war would havo broken out
loug before. Many times sho took the
weapons from tho hands of warriors
bent on the destruction of settlers in tho
region, and it was sho who warned tho
officers of tho army of tho troublo brow?
ing. Her influence with her people be?
gan to wane as their rago against tho
whites increased. Then, too, the war?
riors began to mistrust her husband.
Her food was poisoned by Modocs, and
sho was compelled to sleep in secret
places for fear of death from her own
brothers and relatives for her suspected
undue liking for white people.
Colonel A. B. Meacham, who was in
command of the military post, was a
humane man and did all in his power
to right the wrongs of his dusky wards.
This man Wi-ne-ma revered, and when
the second peaco commissioner was ap?
pointed sho did all in her power to pre?
vent him from attending tho council
with the chiefs. She grasped his horse
by tho bridle, bogging Meaoham and
Canby not to meet Jack and his band.
When she found entreaty was in vain,
tho devoted woman mounted her pony
and rode with tho ill futed party to the
placo of meeting,
i The story cf that meeting has been
told many times. When Meacham was
attacked by tho bloodthirsty Sconchin,
Wi-ne-ma threw herself on tho savngo
and begged him to spare tho life of her
white, friend. Others coming up, Wi-uc
niti ran from warrior to warrior, turn?
ing aside their weapons. At last one of
many bullets struck Meacham senseless,
and tho quick witted squaw turned
aside the weapon aimed to finish his
life, with the words, "Him dead; no
use shoot." Sconchin tried to scalp
Meacham, when Wi-ne-ma grasped tho
knife. The enraged buck struck her a
terrible blow, almost knocking her
senseless. Again the wit of the woman
canio into play. "The soldiers are com?
ing up!" she cried, and tho next mo?
ment a detachment of troops did appear.
Amid curses from the enraged troopers,
a dozen weapons wero leveled at tho
breast of the brave souuw. Looking tho
mounted men straight in tho face, sho
cried: "No shoot mel I tried to savo
them I" Then camo from tho ranks the
words of an enlisted man, "The man
who harms her I'll kill."
Tho same day Wi-ne-ma's husband,
Kiddle, was riding horseback and was
shot dead from ambush by a Modoc.
Tho body was dragged many miles over
tho trail by tho frightened horse. When
tho horse stopped, tho head and shoul?
ders of tho coprse were so horribly mu?
tilated that the body was unrecogniza?
ble. Then tho threo little children of
Wi-ne-ma and Kiddle wero murdered as
they slept and their bodies burned in
tho rude family dwelling. Wi-ne-ma,
under the cover of darkness and eluding
the hostile members of her race and
family, made her way across the deso?
late lava beds to the government post.
Sho was sick and broken hearted at tho
horrible fnto of all her family, but sho
nevertheless became tho constant and
devoted nurse of Colonel Meacham as
ho lay in tho hospital recovering from
his six gunshot wounds. It was 11
weeks before tho colonel was able to
leuvo his bed. By that time. Wi-ne-ma
was ahnest a helpless invalid. She. was
an important witness for the govern?
ment in tho trial of Captain .lack and
his subordinate chiefs for tho murder of
General Canby and other officers, and
for this she herself was shot through tho
chest as sho sat one evening by a win?
dow at her lonely home. Colonel Meach?
am gave, the little woman chief liberally
from his means, and the soldiers at the
post saw that she never lacked medical
at tendance and nursing.?Philadelphia
Times.
TU? itiK Hat In Church.
This is what happens to the man bo- j
hind the hat. The preacher disappears
until nothing remains but a voice. And
with the hat standing against the spot
where the voice is, and tho modulated
sentences breaking against it, bow is
attention to be fixed upon tho sermon?
The mind grows lux, the quiet and
sweetness of the sanctuary tend to dis?
traction, tho hat fills tho whole visi?
ble universe, and involuntarily one's
thoughts center upon it. It is a wonder?
ful construction. There is a yellow rose
trembling on a long stem with every
movement of the wearer's head, and one
begins to calculate the extent of its arc.
There are bunches of feathers disposed,
apparently, with view to preventing
anything from be ing seen between them
whichever way the hat is turned. And
there are stalactites of ribbon, upright
and immovable, which still further ob
ifcuro the horizon. Occasionally one gets
a momentary glimpse of the hand of
tho preacher as it is stretched out in
gesticulation, but it seems a mere de?
tached fragment uselessly beating the
nir. Tho preacher himself lias disap?
peared as if he had never been. The
only thing visible when the hat is turned
for a moment is another hat of tho same
kind fait bei- on.?New York Observer.
How Ii? Traveled.
First Wheelman?Did your traveling
co-;t you much lost year?
Second Wheelman?No. I traveled
mostly on mj face.?Town Topics.
EXOTICS.
Lilies that bloom out of season, niao with nor.
er a leaf,
Roses tliat bavo not the perfume should live
In the heart of u rose.
Could ye not watt till tho eummcrl for now
is the your nt ito close.
Winter beleaguers us truly, but spring shall
soon bring uu relief.
Lilies shall flower in lay garden, lilac shall
comu with tho May.
Roses Kbr.il bloom by tho pathways, rose
leaves lie on tho lawn.
Could ye not wait till the thrushes woko you
with them ore tho dnwn
riushed all'tho west and tho summer comu
with the fullness of day V
Ono lifo was yours, and the summer waited to
give you tho huh.
Warm dews o! night in the starlight, wonder?
ful whisper of rain.
Songs of the nightingale, over yearning, an
angel in pain.
All hud been yours had yo waited, lilies and
roses undone.
?H. D. Lowry in New York Tribune.
Germany has made some bold experi?
ments at railroad speed on tho lino be?
tween Berlin nml G?rlitz. The best per?
formance was G?% miles, which was 12
miles better than tho highest speed of
thu fastest German train, tho Berliu
Hamburg lightning express, which does
177|.< miles in hours. Ordinary
German express trains make 48}<j miles
an hour.
A heavily veiled, handsomely dressed
woman called at the City hospital, Bal?
timore, recently und proposed that the
physicians send to her house and convey
a sick man who lay there to the institu?
tion and kill him by gas or some other
method and dissect tho body immedi?
ately. Sho hated tho man, she said, and
hn was now in her power. Slit; expressed
herself willing to pay well for tbo serv?
ice.
I.KGAI. NOTICES.
TRUSTEE'S SALE.?ON THE 17TII
DAY OF MAY, 1897. at 10 o'clock a. in.,
I will oiler tor sale at public auction on the
premises the following property in the
city of Hoanoke, Va.:
Designated on the map of lots of the
Hoanoke Land and Improvement Com?
pany as lot No. 1148. Fourth ward, ana
bounded as follows: Beginning at a
point on tho north side of Gregory street
3o0 feet enst of Monroe street, thence
north 2 degrees cast 200 feet to Madison
street, thence south 88 degrees east 50
feet to a point, thence south 2 degrees
west 200 feet to Gregory street, thence
with latter north 88 degrees west .ri() feet
to the beginning, containing 10,000 square
feet more or less.
The above sale is made under a deed of
trust from Thos. Stnulleld and Mary F..,
his wife, dated the lirst day of February,
J892, and recorded in deed book 72, page
281, default having been mnde in the
bond therein secured for more than three
months.
The above sale will be made by the un?
dersigned, who was substituted as trus?
tee in the place of John C. Ten Eyck by
an order of the hustings court of Hoanoke,
Va.. entered ab its April term, 1807.
TERMS OF SALE.?Cash. Amount
due understate above deed of trust $200.13,
as of Anrll 18th, 1897.
T.W. GOODWIN.
4 17 td Substituted Trustee.
TRUSTEE'S SALE.?ON THE 17TII
DAY OF MAY, 1897, at 10:10 o'clock a.
m., I will offer for sale at public auction
on the premises the following property in
the city of Hoanoke, Va.:
Bettinning at the northwest corner of
lot No. 4 on the south side of Chestuut
street, and with said street north 84 de?
grees 20 minutes west oO feet to corner of
lot No. 0, and with said lot south ? de?
grees 40 minutes west 100 feet to tin al?
ley, and with said alley south 84 degrees
20 minutes east 50 feet to corner of lot
No. 4, and with said lot north rt degrees
40 minutes 10(1 feet to the beginning.
1 icing lot No. ?, section 8, map of Trout
and Jamison Nin th Side addition to the
city of Hoanoke, Va.
The above sale is made under a deed of
trust from James Graves and Ida, his
wile, dated the 29th day of April, 1803,
and recorded In deed book 87, page S9. de?
fault having been made in the bond therein
secured for more than three months.
The above sale will be made by the un?
dersigned, who was substituted as trus?
tee in the place of John C. Ten Eyck by
an order of the hustings court of Hoan?
oke, Va., entered at its April term, 1897.
TERMS OF SALE: Cash. Amount
ilue under the above deed of trust $507.80,
as of April 13th, 1807.
T. \V. GOODWIN,
4 17 td Substituted Trustee.
TRUSTEE'S SALE.-ON THE 17TH
DAY OF MAY, 1897, at 10:30 o'clock
a. m., I will ofler for sale at public auc?
tion on the premises the following prop?
erty in the city of Rsnnoke. Va.:
The east half of lot No. 4, block forty
live, Rogers, Fairfax and Houston addi?
tion to Hoanoke, Ya.
The above sale is made under a deed of
trust from 1). F. Whltlock and Virginia,
Iiis wife, dated the lirst day of Septem
her, 1S92. and recorded In deed book, 82,
page 74, default having been made in the
bond therein secured for more than three
months.
The above sale will be made !>y the un?
dersigned, who w.is substituted as trus?
tee in the place of .lohn C. Ten Eyck by
an order of the hustings court ol Hoan?
oke, Va., entered at its April term, 1807.
TERMS OF SALE: Cash. Amount
ilue Uiv'cr the above deed of trust
104.00, as of April 18, 1S97.
T. W. GOODWIN,
?I 17 td Substituted Trustee.
TRUSTEE S SALE.?ON THE I7TTI
DAY OF MAY, IS97, at 10:85 o'clock
a. m., 1 will offer for sale at public auc?
tion on the premise.! the following prop?
erty in the city of Hoanoke, Ya.:
The west half of lot No. 4. block forty
five, Rogers, Fairfax and Houston addi?
tion to Hoanoke, Ya.
The above sale is made under a deed of
trust from I). F Whltlock and Vitginia,
bis wife, tinted the 1st day of September,
1802, and recorded In died book fS2, page
Ts, default bavins been made in the bond
therein secured for more than three
months.
Tho above sale will be made by the un?
dersigned, who was substituted as trus?
tee in. the place of John C. Ten Eyck hj
an order of the hustings court o( houn
oke. Va.. entered at its April tctm, 's'.'7.
TERMS OF SALE: Cash. Amount
due uiiiler the above deed of trust $1,
101.88', as of April 18, 1X97.
T. W. GOODWIN,
4 17 td ? fenlmtituted Tm-tec.
TRUSTEE'S SALE -11V VIRTUE OF
a deedoi trust executed February 28,1894,
by Mrs. M. L. Martin and husband, record^
ed.ia deed book 02,page I, of the Koaiioke
LEGAL. NOTICKS,
corporation court clerk's office, default
having been made in the payment of a
portion ol the debt mentioned therein,
and being required so to do by the bene?
ficiary. I shall on the 27TII DAY OF
APRIL; 1897, at 12 o'clock M., at tho
front door of the courthouse iu the city
of Roanoke. sell by public auction to the
highest bidder so much of the property
conveyed in said deed as may tc necessary
to realize the balance due on the debt
therein mentioned. The property con?
veyed in said deed is described as follows,
aud will bo sold n tho order named until
the debt is paid:
First. Beginning at the northeast, cor?
ner of Walker and Brooke streets, thence
with Brooke stteet north 2 degrees east
95 feet to an alley, thence with alley south
88 degrees east 33 1-3 feet to a point,
thence south 2 degrees west 95 feet to
Walker street, thence with Walker street
north 88 degrees west 3313 feet to
Brooke street, the place of beginning.
Second. Beginning at a point on'the
northeast CQiuer of Tazewell avenue aud
Fayette street, and known tis lot 1, sec?
tion 5, Edgewood addition.
TERMS:?Cash sufficient to pny the
costs of executing this trust and the bal?
ance due on debt secured iu said deeil, to
wit: The sum ot $92.51. which embraces
interest, and the residue in two equal au
uual installments from the day ofs ale.
A. K. K1NQ,
_ 4-10-lOt._Trustee.
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF VALUABLE
improved property.?.By virtue of a deed
of trust dated the 30th day of November,
1893, from Jean W. Maddock, a widow, to
the undersigned to secure to C O'Leary
or assigns the payment of $2,519.58, and
default having occurred in the payment
thereof and being so requested by Fidelity
Loan and Trust Company,the assignee of
C. O'Leary, so to do, I will on SATUR?
DAY, THE 15TH DAY OF MAY, 185)7,
at 12 o'clock M.. iu front of the court
bouse in the'eity of Roanoke, Va., proceed
to sell at public auction to tho highest
bb'der, all that certain parcel of land
lying in said city aud described as follows:
Beginning at, a point on the east Hue of
I.ee street 100 feet south of Wells street,
thence south 87 degrees 5 minutes east
along lot No. 12, 200 feet, to a point at
lot 14, thence along same south 2 degrees
15 minutes west 100 feet to lot. !), thence,
along same north 87 degrees 45 minutes
west 200 feet to Lee street, thence along
same north 2 degrees 15 minutes east 100
feet to place of beginning, .being lots 10
and 11, Ward 4, according to the man of
Roanoke Land Improvement Company,
together with the buildings thereon.
TERMS: Cash us to enough to pay the
cost of executing this trust and to pay
said sum of $2,519.58, with interest from
November 30, 1892, and the residue, if
any, shall be payable in two equal annual
installments with interest from day of
sale and secured bv deed of trust'on said
land. THUS. W. .MILLER,
?1 15 t:l_Trustee.
TRUSTEEi'S?SALE OF DESIRABLE
vacant lot.?By virtue of a deed of trust
dated the 1st day of July, 1800, from W.
.T. and L. Bhur, Jr., lo the undersigned to
secure to .lean W. Maddock or assigns
the payment of two notes of $1,100.00,
each with interest from date, payable in
one and two years respectively after date,
aud default having occurred in the pay?
ment of last mentioned note and being so
requested by Fidelity Loan and Trust
Companv, the assignee of .lean W, Mad
dock, I will, on SATURDAY, THE 15TH
DAY' OF MAY, 1897, at 12:15 p. m.| in
freut of the courthouse in the city of
Roanoke, Va., proceed to sell at public
auction to the highest bidder all that
pnrcel of land lying in said city and de?
scribed as follows:
Beginning at a point on the. east side of
Rcanoke street 150 feet north of Walnut
street, thence with Roanoke street north
7 degrees 15 minutes east 50 feet to a
point, th?nce south 85 degrees 45 minutes
east 170 feet to tin alley, thence with said
alley south 7 degrees 15 minutes west 50
feet to a point, thence north 83 degrees 45
minutes wejt 170 feet to place of begin
long,
TERMS. Cash as to enough to pay said
sum of $1,100.00 and interest and the cost
of executing this trust, and the balance,if
fay, shall lie payable in two cental annual
installments with interest from day of
sale and to be secured bv a deed of trust
unsaid land. THOS. W. MILLER,
4 15 ttl Trustee.
TRUSTEE'.* SALE?BY VIRTUE
of u deed of trust txctlted to the under?
signed by .1. 1*. Coon and Nina M. Coon,
his wife, und 3. W. Coon and S. (i. Coon,
his wife, dated the 21st day of August.
189C, and recorded iu the clerk's office ot
the hustings e mit of Roanoke city, Vir?
ginia, in deed book 101!. page 430, to BO
cure to D. S. Ilendriek the payment of
the .-um of seven hundred dollars, with
interest thereon from the 21st dayof Au- I
gust, 1898, ami default having been made |
iu the payment of $350 with interest from
the 21st day of August, 1890, a
part thereof, and being requested so
to do by the beneiu iarv, I will on WED?
NESDAY, THE 12TH DAY OF MAY,
1807, AT 12 O'CLOCK M., at, the front
door of the court house of Roanoke city,
Virginia, make sale at public auction to
the highest bidder the following lot ,>r
parcel of land, together with nil the ap?
purtenances thereto belonging, situated
in the city of Roanoke, Virginia,
bounded and described as follows: Re?
gaining at a point on the south side of
Earnest avenue 25 feet west from Welch
street, thence with Harnest avenue north
78 degrees west. 25 feet to a point, thence
south 12 degrees west 1224-10 feet to an
alley, thence with said alley south Si
degrees east 25 feet to a point, on same,
thence north 12 degrees east 12'? feet
more or less to Earnest avenue, to the
place of beginning.
TERMS:- -Cash sufficient to pny the
costs of executing this trust and the
sum of $350 with interest Irom 21st of
August, 1800, $350on the 21st of August,
1897, and the balance in two equal in- i
stalmcnts, payable respectively iu one
and two years from date of sale, credit
instalments to be evidenced by the notes
of the phichaser and secured by a deed
of trust on the property.
R. RANDOLPH HICKS,
l-lltd._Trustee.
BY VIRTUE OF A DEED OF TRUST,
dated January 5th, 1S-02, and recorded in
the clerk's office ot the hustings court for
the city of Roanoke, Va., in deed book
No 74,'page 300,executed by ('. U.Wert/, to
Clarence M Clark, whereby the hereinaf?
ter described property was conveyed in
trust to secure Mrs By diu S Taylor a cer?
tain bond for $5,000, and the coupons
thereto attached, and whereas, default
having been made in the payment of said
bond and in the payments of the coupons
due July 5, 1890, and January 5. 1807,
each being for the sum of $150. and
whereas, the said Clarence M. Clark hiv?
ing resigned said trust, and tin- under?
signed having been regularly substituted
as trustee in bis place ami stead by an
Ohler of the hustings court for the city of
Roanoke, Va., cc;ered on February 5,
1-EtiAL NOTICES.
1897, after proper notice to nil parties in?
terested in the execution of said trust,
the uudersigaed having been directed to
so do by the beneficiary in said deed, will
at 12 m, on MONDAY, THE 20TH DAY
OF APRIL, 1807, at tho front door of the
courthouse in the city of Ronnoko, "Va.'tH
sell by public auction to the highest bid?
der the property described as follows:
Beginniug nt a point on the east side of
Commerce street 26 feet south ot the in?
tersection of Commerce street with Salem
avenue, thence north 821-2 degrees east
112 feet to a point, thence south 8 1-4 de?
grees east 25 1-2 feet to a point, thence
south 821-2 degrees west 112 feet to
Commerce street, thence with Commerce
street north 8 1-4 degrees west 251-2 feet
to the beginning.
TERMS: ('ash sufficient to pay the cost
of executing this trust, the sum of $5,:RH>
with interest on $5,000, a part thereof,
from January ?, 18D7, till paid; the resi?
due, if any, payablu in two equal annual
installments with interest, to Iw evi?
denced by bonds of the purchaser and se?
cured by a trust deed on the property.
W. D. WILLIAMSON,
4 3 td _Substituted Trustee.
COMMISSIONER'S SALE.?BY VIR
tue of a decree of the circuit court o?
Roauoke, Virginia, entered on the s.ec
ond day of February, 1897, la the chan?
cery cause of Jno. P. Hudson vs. The
lnfe Insurance Company of Virginia, the
undersigned sneclal commissioner ap?
pointed by said decree will sell at public
auction to the highest bidder at the front
door of tho courthouse at 12 o'clock m,
of MONDAY. THE 8RD DAY OF MAY,
1807, the following described real estate:
First. Beginning at a point on tho
southeast corner of Brooke and Walker
streets, and running in an easterly direc?
tion along the south side of Walker
street 7H.7 feet to corner of Common?
wealth avenue, them e in a southwesterly
dlrectlon along Commonwealth avenue
about 24 feet, thence in a westerly direc?
tion about 75 leet to a point on Brooke
street, thence in a northerly direction 20
feet to the place of beginning.
Second. Beginning at a point 50 feet
from the southwest, corner of Walker and
Brooke streets, and running along the
south side of Walker street in a westerly
direction 20 feet, to a point, thene.o in a
southerly direction 100 feet parallel with
Brooke street to a point, thence in an
easterly direction 20 feet to a point,
thence in a northerly direction 100 feet
to the beginning.
Third. Beginning at a point 70 feet
fron: the southwest corner of Walker
and Brooke streets, and running along the
south side of Walker steeet in a westerly
direction 20 feet to a point, thence in a
southerly direction 100 feet parallel with
Brooke street to :v point, thence in an
easterly direction 20 leet to a point,
thence in a northerly direction 100 feet to
the place of beginning.
Four. Beginniug at a point on the
qast side of Brooke atoeet 20 feet south of
Walker street and running iu an easterly
direction about 75 feet parallel with
Walker street to a point on Common?
wealth avenue, thence In a southerly di?
rection along Commonwealth avenue
about 2S feet to a point, thence In a west?
erly direction about 05 feet to a point on
Brooke street, thence in a northerly di?
rection 25 teet to the place of beginning.
TERMS OF SALE:?Cash as to the
costs ot this sale, an approximate esti?
mate of which will be given at tho sale,
and taxes, which are about $111.61 ou
each lot, and the sum ot $400 with In?
terest from tho 30th day of April, 1894,
ou tnoh lot, and the balance payable iu
one and two years, evidenced by interest
ocarina bonds of the purchaser. Title to
property retained until all of the purchase
money Is paid anil deed ordered by the
court.
PERCY MOIR,
Special Commissioner.
I, S. S. Brooke, clerk of the circuit
court for the city ot Hoanoke, do certify
that the bond has been given by tho com?
missioner as required by tho decree In
the chancery cause of J; P. Hudson vs.
The Life Insurance Company of Virginia.
(liven tinder my hand this 1st day of
April, 1807. S. 6. BROOKE,
4-2-td. Clerk.
TRUSTEE'S SALE. ?W11 EREAS BY
a certain deed dated March 1, 1895, re?
corded 111 deed book 07, page 50, in tho
clerk's otliee of tho hustinus court of
Hoanoke, Va., H. A. Smith, in order to
secure a certain debt therein mentioned
due the Traders' Loan, Trust and Deposit
Co., conveyed to the undersigned trustee
all of the following described property:
Beginning at a point on the south side
of Tazewoll street 40 feet east Of Sim?
mons street, thence with said Tazowell
street, north 74 degrees:!!) minutes 45 sec?
onds east It) feet to a point, thence south
15 degrees 29 minutes 15 seconds east 130
feet, to a point, theme south 74 degrees
30 minutes 45 seconds west 40 feet to a
point, thence north 15 degrees 20 minutes
15 seeouds west 130 feet to the begin?
ning and known as lot No. 2, section 5,as
shown by the map of the Belmont ad?
dition to Hoanoke, Va., default having
been made In the payment of a portion of
said debt and being required so to do by
the bolder thereof, I shall, on MONDAY,
APRIL 20, 1897, at 12 o'clock noon, In
front of the courthouse of said city, offer
for sale at public auction to the highest
bidder, the above described property with
appurtenances, upon the following terms:
TERM8: Cash sufficient to pay the
costs of executing this trust, including
a trustee's commission of live per cent.,
to pay off the 1 I past due notes of $12.50
each, with interest thereon, and to pay
all past due taxes and insurance of $7.50,
the balance to be paid $12.50 per month
with tutetest froin'Mnroh l,)1895, the iiisr.
payment to be due and payable May 1st.
ls'.?T. anil one payment on the'lst day of
each month thereafter or until 80 pay:
ments shall have been made and the resi?
due, if any, payable in one and two years
ores the said It. A Smith shall direct.
C. MARK LEY,
3 25 td Trustee.
POCAHONTAS COAL COMPANY.?
Notice Is hereby given. That the stock
holders of the Pocahontas Coal Company
in general meeting of the company held
at Hoanoke, Virginia, on the 28th day of
January, 1897, the said company being
out of debt, ordered a reduction of the
capital stock of the said company to ?l>0.
000, making the par value [ot the shares
of the capital stock $80.00 per share in?
stead of $100.00 per share, and, in carry?
ing such reduction of the capital stock
into effect, ordered, among other things,
a dividend of $27.50 per share out of tho
capital stock of the company, payable on
the 4th day ot May. 1807, at the olllce of
the company in 'he city of Hoanoke, Vii
ginla, to the shareholders of record on the
28th day of January, 1807. on tho produc?
tion and surrender of the certificates of
stock in exchange for new certificates
showing the amount of the reduced cap?
ital of t'm company.
M. C. JAMESON, President,
Hoanoke, Va., January 28th; 1807.
1 20 1 a w-3 m

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