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The Roanoke times. (Roanoke, Va.) 1897-1977, July 11, 1897, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn95079490/1897-07-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOX,. XVIII. NO.
THIS WEEK I
We Offer the "00 Model
$75 "Crescent"
At $35.
-Don't pay $50 or $00 for a
- wheel that you know nothtng
-about; buy the $35 Crescent
-with an iron-clad guarantee.
R0AN0KE CYCLE CO
1?S fc-nlem Avenue.
:Now
i
1m flic Time
to liny .
Tim T?ong-Delnyctl ?n?l Much An
ticlpated Lirop Has Come.
it All 1807 Columbian.? 75 00
a 1807 Tandems. 125 00
? 1800 Models 10, 41, 44. ?<> 00
J 18011 Model V2. 50 00
J 1811(1 Diamond Frame Tan- \
f dems. 80 00 V
w 1S07 Hartfords, patterns 7, 4
P 8. 9 and 10. .10 00 4
P 1807 Hartfords, pattern 1.. -10(10 A
d 1807 Hartfords, pattern 2.. 45 0D a
a ls'.iij Hitrtfords, pattern 5 5
i and (1. 30 <>() J
? The Strongest and Lightest Hun- J
r nlng Bicycle in the World To-day. J
J EDWARDS. GREEN {
p Manufacturing Jeweler. ^
? 6 SALEM AVE. <*
I - 4
? Store closes at 7 p. m. except Sat- \
f turdays and paydays.
f 4
bpalding Racer, Model No. 724.
Spalding Bicycles.
The quality anil popularity of the
'Spalding'' bicycles are well known the
,VOrld over.
Examine the line critically and care
ully?compare point by point with other
ilcycles and we will abide by the result
>f your Investigations.
The name 'SPALDING" is synonv
nOUS of the best.
One second-hand bicycle, good condl
lon, $20._
THE FISMBURN GO.
1<> 4 ';? inplM'li A VC.
HAINE
PiANOS
Are Strictly High Grade.
Call and examine our LARGE STOCK
iefore buying.
Prices and terms
***** GUARANTEED.
I. E. ROGERS & CO.,
DEALERS,
No. 11 S. Jelleraon SI.
-Will buy a Model B "RELAY.
-The best wheel for the money.
-Our $75 and $100 Wheels are
-strictly high grade.
ENGLEBY BR0. & CO
GOOD NEWS.
The most popular penmanship journal
ii tho United States came out on the 8th
ist. beariug a photograph of P'-of. E. M.
loulter. penman of the'National Busi?
es? College, of this city. 11 is su, cess
tiring the past year has lie.-n very
larked as an instructor. He is rvorking
ith a school which is in keeping with
lie national reputation which he is gain
ig. He is not less thought of na a book
eeping instructor than as a "teacher of
lie art of penmanship.
HOT ENOUGH FOR YOU
I have hot weather shoes for everybody,
[eep your feet nice and cool and you can
band the hot weather. I have complete
tocks in two stores?Salem avenue and
efferson street. BACHKACH.
77
RO
NEW FORMS
OF GAMBLING,
Roanoke Men Making W. A. Jor?
dan Independent.
THE CITY COUNCIL RESPONSIBLE
FOR THE INFLICTION ON OUR
CITY OF FIVE GAMBLING MA?
CHINES WHICH ARE REAPING
ENORMOUS PROFITS?THE LAW
SHOULD BE REPEALED AT ONCE
AND THE NUISANCE BANISHED.
From time immemorial mankind 1ms
beim cursed with gambling devices of al?
most every kind. Men have lost Jand
won and then great has been their dis?
appointment or joy. But of all the tie
vices ever yet Inaugurated for the pur?
pose of "skinning" the unwary, the
nickelin-the-slot machines which have
receutly come to curse Roauoke, the one
known as the "Electric," is perhaps the
worst.
These machines, live in number, have
been brought here by W. A.. Jordan, of
Ohio, and have been placed In various
places in the city, each one being located
in a barroom. The machine stands about
four and a half feet high with an oval
top and posted on its fron*' in bold black
letters the inscription "Hold the handle
down or you lose"
On a nickel plate Is inscribed the name
ol the machine, "The Electric."
The handle referred to above is a craak
which alter a nicKel has 'been dropped In
can lie turned so as to stait a wheel on
the inside. This wheel is painted in five
different colors viz: yellow, white, green,
red and b'ack. Yellow pays $1. The
white 50 cents. The green 25 ceuts,
and black and red 10 cents each.
If a mau desires to play the machine he
must at first place an indicator on the
color he wishes to "gamble" on. Some?
times he wins but more often losjs.
Some men think that if they turn the
yellow and get a dollar they are doing a
good business, but such is not the cast,
as the history of the machine is that it
almost invariably takes $2 and sometimes
?*5 for the man who plays it to get the de?
sired dollar.
Men who play them day in and day
out are the greatest 1 users, and so'eutlc
ing are the prospects]of gain that men'will
stand before them for hours spending
their money until their- snpply is ex?
hausted and then if they have a friand in
the near vicinity his purse is drawn on
ouly for the capacious maw of the infer?
nal device to swallow up all that comes
its way.
The 'bum of these machines can be
beard almost every hour In the day and
night as they mpidly gather in'the hard
earned money of tlu patrons of them. In
fact the ower or proprietor has been
beard to say that it was a matter of im
possiblity for a man to^beat "The Elec?
tric," at the same tune claiming that he
was makiug a barrel of money oil' the live
machines in Roanoke. The facts regard?
ing the machines are. th^t men lose some?
times as high as $14 'jar $15 before they
will give up.
One man lost $14 'yesterday. A young
man who is a clerk iost S5 or s(> on it,
and innumerable instances could be re?
cited, and the only instance known to the
writer where any one ever gained by it
wa? the time a young man', dropped a
nickel on the white and won. He took
his gains and bid the machine good bye.
Posted on the front of the machine are
the following directions with the notice
attached that a failure to follow the same
will forfeit all claims on a misplay:
Select color by pushing button on
nickel uial and turning pointer hand to
color desired.
"Put nickel or check In machine, wait
a second until nickel or check 'settles
down " (Here might be appropriately
added "and bid farewell to your earn
ings.")
"Turn the handle gently and "slowly
down and hold down until wheel stops
and until coins are all .'delivered in cup.
In case a winning color does not pay,
hold handle down until proprietor's at?
tention is called.
"A winning color does not win until
the indicator at top of wheel settles down
solidly between.brass pins.
"If Indicator rests on side or top of a
pin on a winning color when wheel stops
a slight tap on top of case while handle
is still held tlown will bring it in place.
"Remember to hold handle down until
coin is counted and found correct and
until proprietor's attention is called if
not correct."
The places at which these machines are
located are as follows:
Barroom of the Ponce tie Leon Hotel,
the Stag, corner of Salem avenue and
Commerce street, B. O. May's saloon at
41) Salem avenue, St. James Hotel bar?
room. The proprietor of the St. James is
in no way connected with the saloon or
with this machine.
The license on the above machines is
if 250. or $50 for each machine, and the
records in the commissioner's office show
that W. A. Jordan Is the Jowner of four
mnchiues and B. O. Mays of one.
The City Council has paved the way'
for the intliction of such devices upon out
people by passing an ordinance which
should be repealed at once and the use of
such machines prohibited in the city un?
der heavy penalties.
The ordinance is as follows:
"A license tax is hereby imposed for
the privilege of conducting or keeping in
any public place any machine or thing of
like nature, used or to be used for the
purpose of gaming, either by aid of
money or the use of money in connection
therewith, commonly known as nickel
I u-the-slo*'-mnchiues. The proprietor
of each machine of like nature shall pay
for the privilege of conducting the same
the sum of *50 per annum for each ma?
chine so used. Any person conducting
or maintaining such machine in his place
of business or In any other public place
without obtaining the license required by
this section, shall be lined not less than
five norjnore than teu dollars for each
ANOKE, VA., SUN
day Le slni'l conduct tbe same without
license."
There are two other niekel-in-the-slot
machines, in the city of a different char?
acter in every particulai but one, and
that is that the patron of the machine al?
most Invariably is the loser. One of these
is located in the Concordin and the other
in Banner's restaurant. Each of these
machines has been assessed the required
$50 and the money has been paid, but the
fact that the city has gotten $050 in rev?
enue should not deter the men who have
the interests or the city in their ham's
from wiping these surreptitious "gam?
blers, "alias'nickel-in-the slot machines,"
out of the city entirely.
These machines are placed in the vari?
ous saloons on the royalty plan, it being
understood that GO per cent, of tbe ga:ns
goes to the owner and 40 per cent, to the
proprietor of the place where the device
is placed.
THE FRIAR WON.
Result of the Rich Realization
Stake Yesterday.
Sheepshead Bay, X. Y., July 10.?The
ricu realization stake, worth about $25,
000, furnished an exciting race here this
afternoon.
The Friar won, with Kenscllaer second
and Buddha third. Time, 2:482-5.
The start was good and Friar had the
lead all the way around, though be got
oft only third.
THE ROANOKE DELEGATION.
It Will Support Mr. Hicks But Will Not
Pledge Itself to Any Other Candidate.
Tbe delegates to the Democratic con?
vention ^which meets in Salem August
1-1 to nominate two candidates on the
Democratic ticket for the house of dele?
gates met last night at the ollice of Moo
maw c?.~ Woods.
J. II. Cutchin was made temporary
chairman and W. E. Thomas secretary,
and the delegates organized by electing
A. W. Lescure chairman.
A resolution wan adopted to the effect
that the delegation believes the best in?
terests of the party will be served by the
nomination of It. Randolph Hicks; but
that it was notsulliclently informed as to
the wishes of the people of the counties
of Bonnoke and Craig to know bow to
vote for the other candidate,' but desired
to cast its vote to tho best interest of the
Democratic, party and to conform as fat?
's possible to the wishes of the counties
of Kounoke and Craig. and resolved that
it will individually and collectively re?
main unpledged as to the second choice
until che day of the convention, thus
leaving the delegation untrammeled to do
what it may seem best at that time to in?
sure the nomination of an acceptable
man and to achieve a Democratic victory.
A'l of the delegates were present except
three.
Insure with Ro. M. Kent, Jr.,
107 Terry building.
A SHORT CONFERENCE.
The Tariff Bill May Reach the President
bv tho 15th.
j Washington, July 10.?The Republican
members of the tariff conference commit?
tee, after the meeting to-day, expressed
the opinion that there would be no strug?
gle over the bill. The conference promises
to be the shortest on record. Members,
of the committee 'now claim that the bill
will be out of conference the early part of
the coming week and will probably get
through Congress the latter part of tho
week and be ready for the President's
signature by the 15th, as originally in?
tended.
HE MAY RECOVER.
New York, "July 10.?A confirmatory
dispatch was received to-day at the ollice
of the Southern 'Pacific railway, sayiug
that First Vice-President C. P. Crocker
had been stricken with apoplexy at his
home at San Mateo, Cal. There were no
further particulars given.except express?
ing a hope for his recovery.
COR BETT DEFEATED.
Manhattan Beach, July 10.?James
Corbett raced Charley Murphy a half
mile on a bicycle this afternoon and the
latter won by a few inches. Time 8 3 5
seconds.
Jn the 100-mile race Waller won by
half a wheel from Barnaby. Despite the
extreme weather the men made good time.
Barnaby captured the 75-mile purse.
EU LL-FL EDO ED CANDIDA'!' E.
Harrisburg, Pa., July 10.?As oppos?
ing the stories regarding his reported re?
tirement. Senator Quay said to-day that
for the first time in his life lie was a
full fledged candidate for United States
Senator. Governor Hastings will assist
Quay in Iiis campaign.
WASHERWOMEN SUFFER.
Washington, July 10.?One of the
greatest, hardships of the delay caused by
the tariff falls on the washerwomen who
wash the linen and towels for the various
departments. They have had no pay since
February owing to refusal of Congress to
take up the deficiency bill, which con?
tains an appropriation for their work.
Some poor women have almost starved
while trying to hold their contracts with?
out any capital.
A PANIC IX CYCLE TRADE.
Hirmingham, July 10.?The cut in
bicycle prices announced by the Budge
Whitworth Company, Limited, of Lon?
don, has caused a general fall of cycle
shares on the stock exchange and almost
a panic throughout the trade.
Only two left of those '00 model - ('res
cents" which we offer this week at $35,
ROANOKE CYCLE CO..
108 Salem Ave. S. W.
TAXES. TAXES.
City taxes lot the year ls!?7 are due. 5
per cent, will be added August 1st if not
paid. Very respectfully,
.1. i". COOX, Collector.
DAY, JULY 11, 181
THE LINES
TIGHTENING.
Goal Mine Strike About Complete
Around Pittsburg.
A MEETING OF THE LEADERS OF
THE MINERS?MEASLTRES OF AID
FOR THE STRIKERS?WEST VIR?
GINIA TO BE URGED BY EVERY
MEANS TO JOIN IN THE STRIKE.
HANNA'S MIXERS QUIT WORK.
Pittsburg, July 10.?The lines are
tightening in all sections of the Pittsburg
mining district, with .the exception of a
few spots. Thedigcers in the New York
and Cleveland Gas-Coal Company's mines
are still working, but President D?lau
and Secretary Warnerare preparing for a
mov? of a sensational order on that point.
It was luoked for to-day, but will be
made some time '.Sunday or Monday, the
time not yet being agreed upon. Presi?
dent D?lau was out at Wickhaven to day,
strengthening his cause there, and will
visit several of the river mines before be
returns.
Telegrams and letters of an encourag?
ing nature from the di fie reut pits in this
district are pouring into the miners'
ollice. Oue of these, written by a miner,
on the Wheeling division of the Baltimore
and Ohio road,complains that the opera?
tors are taking unfair means to whip the
mou. The writer alleges that they are
influencing the bnardinghouse keepers to
issue attachments against the single men
for the small amounts they owe, and are
also threatening the men having families
with landlords' warrants and ejection If
they don't return to work.
From an operator it is learned that the
mines of the Washington Coal and Coke
Company, in Strickier's Hollow, are
working full, and yesterday loaded 100
cars of coal, which went to Cleveland,
where there is said to be a scarcity. This
mine is on the line of the Pittsburg, Me
Keesport and Yougholgeuy railroad, and
has not heretofore been considered in the
Pittsburg district.
The best information puts the present
state of the strike iu this district as
about complete, with the exception of the
pits of the New York ami Cleveland Com?
pany, four or live small mine.-, and seve?
ral others in the fourth pool. It seems
that the officials are having more trouble
in getting the miners of the Upper-River
section out than in any other portion of
the territory. It is also the vital point
of the district. Strong effort'.; will be
made next week by President Doran to
get all the river diggers into the move?
ment. Through his efforts yesterday the
minors at Whitset and West. Newton
went "tit. Some of the reports from the
Monougaheln river"dlstrict .indicate that
many miners of that "section are weaken?
ing, and some have already returned to
work, with prospects of more following
the same example before long.
The Chamouui mines of the Tide Coal
Company: the mines of the Charles Jutte
Company: the Samuel O'Neil mines at
Fayette, and the Jones mines at Mouott
gtthcla were at work to-day. This con?
dition of affairs is causing much excite?
ment in the Val'ey. A special from Fay?
ette City says:
"Crowds of idle'miners are gathering,
and unless the miners of the -places in
operation lay down their tools at once it
is said n march of miners, beginning at
Fayette City, with a brass band; leading,
will lie made, and every man pursunded
to quit work. The miners* when spoken
to were in deadly earnest, and will not.
rest until every digger comes out anil
joins in the general strike. The serious
condition of affairs in the Valley has been
nude known to the miners' officials, and
President Dolanwlll probably arrange for
a mass-meeting at Lucyville or Monor.ga
Iiela within the next forty-eight hours."
? A miner from the Valley, who was at
headquarters to-day, said it was neces?
sary to draw out all of the miners in that
section, if success were ''e'ired.
The otlicials of United Mine Worker?,
both local and national, 'realize that this
is a crucial time in the strike movement,
with the greatest interest centered in the
Pittsburg district. Efforts trill be made
to get all the working river miners, and
the D'Ariuitt men. such as were never
made before in the history of a coal
strike. Much depends upon their suc?
cess ami, in fact, it will likely be the
turning point in the movement.
RJUp to the present time: not a man has
quit at the mines of the 'New York and
Cleveland Gas-Coal Companv, and none
are expected to join the strikers. Presi?
dent W. B. D'Armitt says the men are
perfectly satisfied with Ithe price and the
conditions. They are receiving 10 cents
a tun above what; is called for in their
contracts.
An unusual quantity of coal came, 'in
from the Fairmount region of West Vir?
ginia, orer the Baltimore'and Ohio rail?
road, and is crowded in the Glenwood
yards. Most of it will go to the lakes.
The mines on the Pennsylvania railroatl
are tunning to their fullest capacity, and
operators In need of coal are making
heavy purchases; One operator purchased
150 car-loads yesterday ftoin the Keystone
Coal and L'oke Company.
The shortage of coal is severely felt by
the railroads. Wholesale confiscations
are the mil: on all lines 'shipping west.
Cleveland, July 10.?Judge Stevenson
Burke,railroad counsel anil possessing ex?
tensive- interests in railroads.said to-day:
?T do not know of any law giving rail?
road companies authority to confiscate
Independent shippers' coal."
There is a strong probability that the
street railways and the suburban electric
railway system m-iy have to shut down
for want of coal.
Fifteen cars consigned to the Bit! Con
solldnted were confiscated i>y the railroad
companies to-day.
The manager of M. A. Hanna & Co. re?
ceived'a message today stating that
every single miner employed at the com?
pany's mine.'' had gone out. 'The llanna
people h ive been confident of their ability
to hold their men. Information rc wived
here shows that tho shut down on the
Wheeling divison of tho Baltimore and
Ohio railway is absolute. ^General Man?
ager Woodford.^of tho Cleveland, Lor?
raine and Wheeling railway, says that no
coal is being mined nlong his road. He
Is not prepared to"say that he will not
haul West Virginia coal.
Unless coal begins coming 'into Cleve?
land in a few days the situation will 1?
serious. [The lighting companies fear the
city will be left In darkness. The direc?
tor of the public works is alarmed over
bis ability to keep the water "supply go?
ng. The street car companies fear a sus?
pension of travel, and manufacturing
concerns with orders "to fill are fearful
lest their works will have to ^shut down
for want of fuel. j
THE NATIONAL LEAGUE.
At Cleveland--Cleveland, 3 runs.G hits,
0 errors. Washington. 1 run, 0 hits, '2
error. Batteries: Wilson and Creiger;
McJames and Farrell.
At Chicago?Chicago, 8 runs, 14 hits,
15 errors. Bostou, ? runs, 13 hits, 3 er?
rors. Batteries: Korwan 'and 'Donohue;
Stivetts and Lake.
At Cincinnati?Cincinnati, 0 runs, 10
hits, 2 errors. ^Philadelphia, 3 runs, !l
hits, "3 errors. Batteries: Breitenstein
and Vaugban; Fifleld and Mc.Farlaud.
At Pittsburg?Pittsburg, 0 runs, 10
hits, 8 errors. New York, 10 runs, IT
hits. 5 errors. Batteries: Tanuehill and
sugden; Meektn and Warner.
At Louisville?No game between Lou?
isville and.Balttmore on account of wet
grounds.
At St. Louis?St. Louis, 4 runs. 10
hits, 2 errors. Brooklyn, 3 runs, 0 hits,
4 errors. Batteries: Hart'and Douglass:
Kennedy and Smith.
Standing ok the Cluiis. W L PCt
Boston. -in 1? 730
Cincinnati. 40 19 0SO
Baltimore. 31) 2\ 050
New York. 38 23 (127
Cleveland. 33 20 532
Pittsburg. 20 33 408
Brooklyn. 20 34 460
Philadelphia. 30 36 458
Chicago. 27 37 423
Louisville. 25 35 417
Washington. 23 37 384
St. Louis. 13 50 208
~ ATLANTIC LEAGUE.
STANPING OK THE CUJUS. \V L PCt
Newark. 41 28 504
Lancaster. 30 28 582
Hartford. 35 32 522
Richmond. 33 32 508
Norfolk. 30 32 484
Patcrsou. 32 30 471
Athletics. 32 30 471
Reading. 22 41 340
Something New
in Negligees!
Tins hot wkatheii is bhixg
lNli out i'retty katterxs in
SOKT, cool, negligees. Tills
week wk have somk ENTIIlKI.y
NEW coi.ok8 without collars
and soft Mai>nas cloth.
Price $1.
G1LKKSON & TAYLOR.
TO FIGHT THK MEASURE.
Western Republicans Will Oppose the
Currency Commission.
Washington, July 10.?Western Re?
publicans are malting a strong light
against the proposition for a currency
commission. Great pressure is being
brought to bear upon tho President by
Western Senators and Representatives to
at lea?t p ?stnone until next session the
sending of a message to Congress.
The fact that it is utterly Impossible
now to pass a resolution through the
Senate authorizing such a commission is
being urged upon the President, anil
strong arguments as to the efTects of stich
an attempt on the situation in the West
are also being presented.
Secretary (l?ge intends to devote a
great deal of his time this summer to
perfecting his plan for a currency hill.
If action goes over this session he is cer?
tain of bis ability to present a satisfac?
tory bill iu the fall.
BABY HARBISON PROSTRATED.
Indianapolis, .Inly 10. ?Ex-President
Harrison and little Baby Harrison were
nearly prostrated with tho intense hint
here today. The family left hurriedly
for their summer home In the Adlron- J
dacks. The condition of the bab> is very
sei ions.
NEW ORDER OF THINGS.
Washington. .Inly 10.-Several recent
incidents In the pension [bureau, entirely
apart from the restoration of chiefs ol di?
visions and clerks, have indicated in a
very positive manner the accession of the
new administration. It has been partic?
ularly noticeable in the pension claims
which were refused'udjudication by the
pension bureau under the Cleveland ad?
ministration anil which were subse?
quently introduced in Congress as private
pension bills,'which, failing to pass, have
been brought before the piesent admin?
istration and promptly allowed, indient
j ing either a more liberal policy or reck
! less extravagance.
MET INSTANT DEATH.
Chicago, July 10.?,Tos?ph H. F.ilde
brate't was Instantly killed to day by be?
ing struck on the head by a falling block
of Ice down an elevator Bhalt at tie- Chi?
cago Packing Company.
DEATHS FROM HEAT.
New York, duly 10.?The thermometer
registered 02 degrees liere this afternoon
Ht 3 o'clock. Continuance of the exces?
sive heat is predicted for |the next three
days. There were s'x Midden deaths and
twenty live prostrations Itero today. The
excessive heat is causing much sickness
and greatly Increasing Tue death rate. It
expanded the'dour" it General Grant's
tomb so much that they cannot he
opened.
PRICE 3 CENTS
JAPAN IS
FIGHTING MAD.
She Will Stubbornly Oppose the
Annexation of Hawaii.
MAY RECALL. HER MINISTER NOW
STATIONED AT WASHINGTON.
THERE IS A SPICY DIPLOMATIC
STRUGGLE AHEAD, AS SECRE?
TARY SHERMAN'S ANSWER TO
HER PROTEST IS NOT CONSID?
ERED SATISFACTORY.
Washington, July 10.?The situation
between the Tokio nnd Washington gov?
ernments "has not i iiproved, and the
differences over the question at Issue may
lead to a rupture. Japan believes that
her rights in Hawaii have not been re?
spected in the treaty, and, while wishing
to maintain her friendly relations with
this country, her pritle has been touched
to such an extent that *a total disregard
on the part of our government for the
representations she has mnde and wl'l
make will probably be followed bv some
mark ot disapproval, perhaps the recall
of her diplomatic, representatives here or
retaliation of a commercial character. 'm
Japan's attitude toward annexation
will be more fully made known to the
State. Department to-day or Monday.
The note written by Secretary Sherman
In answer to the Japanese protest against
annexation has not been accepted by the
I Tokio government as a refutation of its
claims, and the reply which Mr. Toru
Hoshi, the Japanese minister here, will
send to the Seeretaty of State wil' ex?
press the dissatisfaction with which the
contentions of the United States are
viewed.
The last section of the 'Japanese reply
was received by [Mr. Hu?hi by cable yes?
terday. It is very long, and discusses in
detail all the points made by *Mr. Sher?
man.
No Inkling concerning the arguments
advanced ^to counteract Mr. Sherman's
representations will be given at the Jap?
anese legation, where Mr. Horrhi contin
ties to assure those who Inquire about the
j position of his government that Japan
has no designs on the Hawaiian Islands.
Grnntlne this, there Is no doubt that
I Japan will not allow the islands to be?
come part of the United States in accord?
ance with 'the provisions of the treaty
now before the Seuate without a strug?
gle, a purely diplomatic struggle, in all
probability, but one that will be full of
spice and perhaps some display of feel?
ing.
Minister Hoshi Is still waitinf also for
a reply to his personal note to Secretary
Sherman, asking why he had been noti?
fied that no Hawaiian treaty was pend?
ing.
Official dispatches 'from the Hawaiian
government representing an apprehen?
sive' feeling among the people of the
island on account ol the attitudo of Ja?
pan were laid before Assistant Secretary
Day yesterday .by Mr. Hatch, the Ha?
waiian minister. The dispatches show
that the authorities of the republic are
uneasy and fear trouble before'annexatlon
can be accomplished.
M". Hatch expressed to the assistant
secretary,by direction of bis government,
the earnest hope that the ratification of
the annexation treaiywould be expedited,
which was a "diplomatic way ot telling
the United States that elTurts should be
made by the executive tojiave the Sen?
ate not at once.
The Senate committee on foreign rela?
tions to-day took up the Hawaiian annex?
ation treaty, but there was not a full at?
tendance.
Treaty was discussed at some length,
and the more pronounced of the advocates
of the treaty suggested the advisability
of early action. This suggestion was an?
tagonized, hewever, by the opponents of
ratification and by at least one of the
supporters of annexation on the ground
that the matter is too important for Im?
mediate action. Committee adjourned
until text Wednesday.
M A RTINSVILLE WET.
Martinsville, July 10.?(Special.)?The
result of the local option election here
to day resulted In a victory for the
"wets " The vote stood: For license,
368; against license, 1ST. Majority tor
license, 184.
FELL SIX STORIES.
New York, duly 10.--Joseph Butler fell
six stories down an elevator shaft this
afternoon at 3-17 West Twenty-sixth
street, and died half an hour later at the
New York Hospital.
THE WKATHBK.
Forecast for Virginia: Fair Sunday;
warmer; noutlierly windN.
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