OCR Interpretation


Mohave County miner and our mineral wealth. (Kingman, Ariz.) 1918-1922, August 10, 1918, Image 6

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96060547/1918-08-10/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for PAGE SIX

PAGE SIX
THE MOHAVE COUNTY MINE R AND OUR MINERAL WEALTH, SATURDAY, AUGUST 10, 1918
and OUR MINERAL WEALTH
Official Paper of Mohave County
Issued Weekly by the
MOHAVE COUNTY PUBLISHING CO.
Entered ns second-class matter at the post office
at Kingman, Mohave County, Arizona, under Act of
Congress of March 1, 1879.
W.- G. DAMON Editor and Manager
ANSON H. SMITH Mining Editor
Subscription rates ?3 per year, payable in advance
THE FIRST
This issue, the first of the combined Mohave Coun
ty Minsr and Our Mineral Wealth, was gotten out
under difficult working conditions. Combining two
organizations the size of the Miner and Our Min
eral Wealth entails considerable work and the first
week or so of the combination are very apt to reflect
less than our best efforts..
We appreciate, however, the excellent support of
our merchants as evidenced in this issue. We are in
a position to give them better results with the com
bined circulations of the two papers and the reader
can be greatly benefitted by watching the "store
news" each week.
And we appreciate the good will toward the com
bination as expressed by many of our readers this
week. We feel that it was a popular move-
o
GOLD SHORTAGE SERIOUS
PROBLEM
Under ordinary conditions the shortage of gold
would not be a serious matter, but under war condi
tions there is a mighty problem confronting the peo
ple. Mining men of all classes, and especially those
operating distinctively gold properties are getting
together in an effort to have something logical in the
wa" of legislation done for the stabilizing of the
metal w ith the uptrend of costs. One of the propo
sitions that has received the greater amount of con
sideration is a bonus system. It has been estimated
that the costs of producing gold has increased day
by day since the outbreak of the war until the pres
ent cost has reached $30. As an offset to this in
creased costs it is propose to pay to the producer
a bonus of $10 on each and every ounce of the yel
low metal produced, and to require of the operators
a speeding up of production. The fact that gold
production and development of gold properties has
fallen off during the past two years makes it im
perative that something be done back of the scenes.
The, payment of bonus to producers will not cause
a speeding up of mines in process of development,
nor will it cause men with money to take up new
properties, no matter how inviting they may be, un
less some relief from 'high wage and material costs
are met. The farmer who was perfectly willing to
sell his wheal) at 80 cents two years ago has bee.i
allowed to charge as high as $2.40 and $2.60 for it
without having to pay heavier farm charges than
heretofore. If there is to be protection of every form
of industry, why not that of mining? Should theie
be a gold failure in the United States it is possible
that countries now laboring under a staggering warrr
debt would turn to some other form of money, and
that gold and silver would be sidetracked. While
we do not look for this, we wish to call the attention
of our people to the fact that in the early days of the
war the banks and business men of the United States
refused to receive further shipments of gold from
Europe. Why? Decause if Europe was drained of
its gold supply there would be no reason for its fur
ther use as a money metal in those countries and the
debtors might wish to dictate to the creditors the
form of money in which they would pay off their in
debtedness. It would be impossible to meet their ob
ligations in gold or siher, and the whole monetary
system of the world would be disrupted. And to
maintain this present system it will be necessary to
open new gold mines, increase the production of all
metals mines, and throw open the doors to the small
miner and prospector. '
o
HIGH PRODUCTIONS OF ARMS
AND MUNITIONS
The attention of owners of Liberty Bonds and War
taMngs Stamps is called to the following. They are
iiuancing the work!
On one day in June last approximately 27,000,000
cartiidn'& of various descriptions were produced in
the V.iiled States manufacturing plants for the
United States Government-
The daily average production of United States
army rifles was broken in the week ending June 29,
an aerage of. 10,142 rifles a day of a modified En
field and Springfield type being maintained. In ad
dition spare parts equivalent to several thousand
rifles and several thousand Russian rifles were man
ufactured. The Oulnance Department has produced 2,014,815,
' 584 caitridges, 1,886,769 rifles, and 82,540 machine
guns fince the jjited States entered the war. The
daily output of cartridges is now 15,000,000.
WHAT WE FIGHT FOR
The high aims of America and her allies are well
expressed in President Wilson's greetings to France
on Bastile day:
"As France celebrated our Fourth of July, so do we
celebrate her Fourteenth, keenly conscious of a com
radeship of arms and purpose of which we are deeply
proud. Th sea seems very narrow today, France is
so close neighbor to our hearts. The war is being
fought to save ourselves from intolerable things, but
it is also being fought to save mankind. We extend
qur hands to each other, to the great peoples with
whom we are associated; and to the peoples every
where who love right and prize justice as a thing be
yond price, and consecrate ourselves once more to
the noble enterprise of peace and justice, realizing
the great conceptions that have lifted France and
America high among the free peoples of the world.
The French flag flies today from the staff of the
White House, and America is happy to do honor to
that flag."
o
A German paper calls Secretary Baker a liar when
he says that more than a million American soldiers
arc now in France. That insult is being avenged b
the million over there, and greater vengeance will be
dealt by the several other millions soon to be on their
way.
"The Peaceful Warrior"
I have no joy in strife,
Peace is my great desire; ' mt
Yet God forbid I lose my life
Through fear to face the fire.
A peaceful man must fight
For that which peace demands
Freedom and faith, honor and right,
Defend with heart and hands.
Farewell, my friendly books;
Farewell, ye woods and streams;
The fate that calls me forward looks
To a duty beyond dreams.
Oh, tetter be dead
With a 'race turned to the sky
Than live beneath a slavish dread
And serve a giant lie-
' Stand up, my heart, and strive
For the things most dear to thee!
Why should we care to be alive
Unless the world be free?
Henry Van Dyke in Scribner's Mag
azine. o
PASSES THE TWO MILLION MARK
Arizona has passed the two million dollar mark in
the sale of Thrift StampsKd is on the way to the
tiiee million goal. The amount to be raised is $5,
274,620, or about $21 per capita. During the
month of July, Mohave county passed from fourth
position to that of fifth, but is close up to Coconino
county. The fact that Mohave county has only raised
$34,379 of its quota of $80,520 is not a good showing
for the people, and it is up to them tp remedy it.
Mohave county has 'to raise $46,133 before the first
of January, and will also have to go through another
Liberty Loan campaign. There are many men in
this county who can readily buy from $500 to $1000
ol Thrift Stamps and not miss the money, and at
the same time would have a splendid investment. It
may not be news to the general public, but it is a
fact that was the purchase of Thrift Stamps not
limited to $1000 per person the entire issue would be
snapped up by the big fellows of the country on ac
count of its ideal investment feature. So why should
the little fellows who can make small investments
pass it up?
WAR BANK NOTES
We're to have a war-time currency. It will con
sist of a big issue of new $1 and $2 bills symboliz
ing the present war.
The $1 note will havq on its face a portrait of
George Washington, who fought and won our first
war for freedom, and on the reverse side an eagle in
warlike attitude clutching the American flag. The
$2 note will bear on its face a picture of Thomas
Jefferson, the greatest of our earliest exponents of
democracy, and on the back the design of one of our
new battleships that are fighting for world democ
racy. These bank notes, needless to say, have nothing in
common with the huge quantities of paper money is
sued by the German government. The German pa
per is mere fiat money, unsecured promises to pay..
Defeat will no doubt invalidate that German paper.
The American paper, meant to replace our present
silver certificates, is issued by the federal banks,
backed by ample security, and exchangeable for coin
at any time.
SWANSEA MINE LOCKOUT
The Swansea mine, which has been under opera
tion on lease the past year or so, has had a strike
in progress, which shut the property down for the
time being. The Swansea mine has been one of the
.important properties of the Bill Williams Fork, in
Yuma county, and it is to be hoped that the difficul
ties will soon be surmounted. Strikes at this time
aie bad, not only for the property, but, for the men
ho stop work- The United States government has
a mediator whose duty it is to settle all grievances
between employer and employe, and it is
to be hoped that both parties will come to their
senses and reopen the mine. Properties of the mag
nitude of the Swansea are necessary to the economy
of the country and it is possible that our govern
ment will give the company a hint that it would be
well to start production again. Then the federal
mediator will settle the grievances.
PUBLIQ SHOULD NOT HESITATE
Presumably the public utility companies can han
dle themselves by meeting market conditions, if their
cixdit is supported by fair treatment on the part of
the communities in which they are located. It is per
fectly evident that the public utilities are in a hard
situation, with their incomes restricted by fixed
rates of compensation and their expenses increasing
under war conditions. The situation is so plain that
the public should not hesitate to meet it. Since the
Federal Government has become responsible for rail
road earnings it has been prompt to recognize the
v necessities, and to safeguard itself with a liberal
margin to spare. The example should be adopted
by municipalities to the extent of allowing a fair re
adjustment of earnings and expenditures.
c o .
A CALL TO DUTY
From the battle fields; in France there comes an
unspoken call that should find an answer in every
American's heart. The recent great events in Eu
rope, the successes of American armsl on the fields
of France should spur every American to greater ef
fort. Our people at home should not rest on the laurels
of our soldiers in France. Every death on the field
of honor in the line of duty and for our country's
cause should be a call to us for every sacrifice and
every exertion to aid the cause for which our soldiers
are fighting, for which our soldiers have died.
Increase production, decrease consumption, save,
and lend to the Government. Every cent lent to the
United States is used" to support, strengthen, and aid
our soldiers in France.
The bravest battle that ever was fought,
Shall I tell you where and when?
On the maps of the world you will find it not;
'Twas fought by the Mothers ofMcn.
Joaquin Miller.
CONGRESSMAN JAMES H.
DEAD; HAD
INTERESTS IN KINGMAN
Hon, James H. Davidson, member
of the Military Affairs committee, and
son-in-law of F. A. Wilde of Kingman,
died last Tuesday night at 8 p. m. in
Washington, D. C. Mr. Davidson had
been lingering in a serious condition
for several months-
The deceased was nationally known
having represented his "district in
congress for 18 years, and during that
time having been actively identified
with the Rivers and Harbors commit
tee and the Railway and Canals com
mittee, of which he was formerly
chairman.
He is survived by a wife, a daugh
ter and two sons, the elder son, K. W.
Davidson, now awaiting a call to the
colors at Washington, and the young
er, J. F. Davidson, an ensign in the
navy.
Mr. Davidson is known in Mohave
county in connection with visits made
here in the interest of the D. P. & W.
Co., in which he was formerly interest-
ed.
WANTED Someone to take care of
good three-room house. Rent free.
Inquire Old Trails Garage.
Camp Fire
irls Dance-
Again the Camp Fire Girls went
"over the top" Saturday night, when
they gave another Red Cross dance.
A soldier boy who passed through
Kingntan last week on one of the
troop trains, donated his hat, which
was decorated with various devices,
and it was sold at the dance, $7.40
being lealizcd, George Brown winning
it. Altogether $42.35 was cleared.
Half of this will be donated to the can
teen Amd of the Red Cross, as they
are badly in need of money now.
The Camp Fire Girls held election
of officers for the coming year last
week. They met at the home of Miss
Dorothy George and delicious refresh
ments were served. Miss George was
elected treasurer and Miss Lulu Good
win secretary. Next week the girls
meet at the home of Miss Frances
Sherman at I eight o'clock in the evening.
VISITS CAPITAL
George Kayes returned Thursday
morning on the belated train from
Phoenix, where he had been several
days looking after business affairs.
He reports that there have been heavy
rains in the l whole country from
Phoenix northward and washouts on
the Peavine and the main line of the
Santa Fe wasthe cause of many de
layed trains.
THE PICKWICK HOTEL
AND APARTMENTS
HEADQUARTERS FOR ARIZONA FOLKS
Central Location Only Two Blocks from Shopping District
LOBBY
ROOMS $1.00 UP
Largest
Coolest
Most Convenient
In
the
City
Single
and
Double
APARTMENTS
$5.00 Per
to
$20.00 Week
PHONE 10483 LOS ANGELES 833 SO. GRAND AVE.
A Small Deposit Will Secure Your Reservation
Reliable information, suggestions, reservations no charge. We especially desire to
hear from parties, lodges, societies, and organizations. Auto stage tickets and seat
reservations secured. (Dally service San Francisco to Imperial Valley, Camp Kearny,
Riverside Aviation Field, etc.) Autos furnished for private use, reliable, competent
drivers, go anywhere. Write, phone, or call. LANE'S TRAVEL SERVICE BUREAU,
822 WEST SIXTH STREET, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA. Phones: Pico 1007,
Home 10743.
LOS ANGELES
HOTEL LEE
LOS ANGELES
Sixth and
Flgueroa Sts.
Modern European
RATES 75c to $3.00
ROOM WITH BATH $1.00 UP
Special Summer and Weekly Rates
All depot cars pass the door. Garage
connected. Cafe next door.
WM. B. CLARK, Prop.
GATES Hotel $1
Sixth and
Flgueroa Sts.
Fireproof
Cafe and Restaurant. Garage in con
nection. Close to Stores. Theaters and
all Car Lines. Los Angeles' Finest
Tourist and Family Hosterly. Take
Tatl at Our Expense.
LEE HOLLADAY. Pies, and Mgr.
GEO. A. COLLINS, Sec'y.
THE NEW HOTEL BEALE
KINGMAN, ARIZONA
FINEST HOTEL IN NORTHERN ARIZONA
New and modern in every respect. Fireproof build
ing. Rooms single or en suite, with or without bath.
Hot and cold water in every room. Steam heat.
Large sample rooms.
Rates $1.00 and Up
THOMAS DEVINE
Proprietor
iiiiiin
a
Old Trails Garage
Successor to
Kingman Vulcanizing Works
Tires Retreaded and Sections Put in. Tubes Repaired
Quick Service and All Work Guaranteed
MONTE WILLIS GUYA. MENSCH L. D. SANDEFUR H. R. GREEN
STANDARD AUTO CO.
OFFICE: BEALE HOTEL LOBBY, PHONE BLUE 147
ONDED CARS COMPETENT DRIVERS
L
Daily Stages to Oatman and Chloride
J Economize
I 1 u: j : i.i.:
on your plumbing during this war period and put
that economy into Bonds with your Uncle Sam.
Boost War Savings Stamps The Baby Bonds
C. A. PATTERSON
Residence Black 73. PHONES Shop Blue 134.
E. Elmo Bollinger
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Citizens .Bank BIdg.
KINGMAN, ... ARIZONA
ROBERT S. BILLINGS
MINING AND
METALLURGICAL
ENGINEER
Kingman Transfer Co,
C. B. Cassetty, Prop.
Hauling and Storage
We are prepared to haul, move or
slide anything to any place at any
time.
Phone Blue 111
WE BUY ALL KINDS OF
JUNK
PETTENGER & NICHOLS
On East Side of Highway, Ex
treme South End of Fourth St.
VAN MARTER
Undertaking
Parlors
Funeral Directors
and Embalmers
Orders Taken for
Cut Flowers, Wreaths, Etc
Agent for
Granite and Marble
Monuments
PHONE BLUE 81
KINGMAN VULCANIZ
ING WORKS
UNITED STATES TIRES
Vulcanizing. Tires and Tubes Re
paired. Retreading Recapping.
Retreaded and Second Hand Tires
For Sale.
Mrs. Chas. Wilkins -:- Prop.
THE LOCUST ROOMS
$3.00 Per Week 50c and 75c
: : : Per Night : : :
Cor. Beale & 3d Sts. Kingman
If You Want Your Work Ton
vRight, go to the best equipped
luaiiiuie oiiu mucins mi in snop in
Arizona. Spring work a specialty.
Oxy Acetyline Welding in connec
tion. J. C. MADDUX, Kingman.
E. E. Armour
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Kingman - - Arizona
Peach Springs Trading
Post
Hualpai Indian Reservation
E. H. CARPENTER, Prop.
Staple Groceries, Lunch Goods
Soft Drinks, Fruit, Cigars
Tobacco, Red Crown Gaso
line, Zeroline Oil
Peach Springs Ariz.
A.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Services every Sunday at 11
o'clock a. m. in the Odd Fel
lows' Hall. Sunday school at
10 o'clock a. m.
Everybody welcome.
MINING PRODUCTS BOUOHT
We are 'Smelters, Refiners and Buyers of Gold and
Silver Ores, Concentrates, Cyanide Products, Amalgam,
Bullion, Platinum, Battery Chips and Old Copper Plates
HIGHEST CASH RATES PAID
WILDBERG BROS.
Established II Yuri
Offices 411-414 Pacific BIdg.
Fourth and Market Sts. Sao Francisco
C. W. HERNDON
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Kingman, Arizona
l

xml | txt