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Mohave County miner and our mineral wealth. (Kingman, Ariz.) 1918-1922, July 24, 1920, Image 2

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96060547/1920-07-24/ed-1/seq-2/

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I
wAOR TWO
THE MOHAVE COUNTY MINER AND OUK MINERAL WEALTII.
SATURDAY, JULY 24, 1920.
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Mohave County Miner
The End of a Perfect Day
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Our Mineral Wealth
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Official Paper of llohavo County
Issued Weekly by the
MOHAVETRINTING and PUBLISHING COMPANY
Entered as aecond-clesa matter at the postofflce at Kingman,
Mohave County, Arlsona, under Act of Congress of Mar. 1, 1879.
W. . DAXOV Editor and Manager
AVaOV X.B3HIH , . Mlnlnr Editor
Subscription rates IS per year, payable In advance.
STABILIZING COAL MINING
THE NEED FOR CO-OPERATION
One of the greatest industrial pursuits of the east, middle west and
south is coal mining and, like silver, its' production and marketing has
never been stabilized. During the spring and summer months miners are
laid off everywhere and the mining villages almost deserted. Then a
demand for coal sets in and the mines are rushed to feverish capacity and
the railroads are called upon to furnish hundreds of thousands of cars to
carry the products to the various industrial and other centers where de
mands are greatest. Other lines of traffic are at times side tracked to
make way for coal and as a consequence these other lines are either com
pelled to close down, or operate in a small way, creating unrest among
the workers and in many instances causes strikes and lockouts.
During the spring and summer months the mines are eithev compell
ed to seek other employment or else hang around the coal centers await
ing the starting up of the mines, because these men really know nothing
other than coal mining work. One who knows can hardly blame them
if when the rush time comes they strike against the intolerable condi
tions imposed on them. Coal mines should be operated all the year
around and the product should be so distributed during the slack times
that there will be no railroad congestion with its consequent deterrant in
fluences on other industries duringthe fall and winter months. Few
people realize the peculiar position of the coal producers and the miners.
"They are worse off than the fanner who has to hire an excess of laborers
during the harvest season, because these harvest hands may turn their
attention to other employments; but not so with the miner. He has his
family at the mines and must perforce' remain until the mines open again,
which usually means several months, and this unemployment is the basis
of discontent and strikes. The failure to operate the mines steadily has
created more unrest in the industrial centers of the east than almost any
other one thing and it is to be hoped that congress or the industrial com
mission will find a way to put the mines on a stable productive basis
and give the men all the year employment.
4 Daniel Willard is frequently referred to as "the Jim Hill of the East."
Hill', the Empire Builder, and the greatest of Western railroad men, many
'years ago prophesied that the terminal facilities in great cities would
soon be outgrown, and his warnings have proved to be correct. Mr. Wil- '
lards was a pillar of strength to the United States government when the
war, made it necessary to pool the interests and facilities of the country's
railroads. There have perhaps been few railroad men whose opinions
have carried greater weight than his. His testimony before the Inter
state Commerce Commission has evoked general approval. It is im
portant, he says, especially in times of car shortage, " that the shippers
should load cars as quickly as is economically possible and practicable
after they are received. The shipper should also furnish prompt and
definite billing instructions, and the instructions so furnished should take
the car if possible to its ultimate destination. Much delay is caused by
the practice of billing cars subject to order or re-consignment in transit,
and numerous other devices that have come about from time to time.
All arrangements of this kind serve to retard the movement of cars. .
All arrangements of this kind are in effect a special privilege aside from
the service of transportation, and in times of car shortage such privileges
are at the actual expense of those whose business is interfered with be
cause of their inability to ship at all.
"Railroad statistics show that the average car load on all the rail
roads in the United States is only about 70 per cent of the carrying
capacity of the car, and in addition to that about 32 per cent of the
total mileage is made with empty equipment," says Mr. Willard. "A
great deal can be done towards getting a more effective use of cars by
increasing the car load, and this is a matter almost entirely within the
control of the shipper ,and serious consideration should be given among
other things to the revision of minimum car load regulations, to the end
that a more effective use be made of all cars.
"It is of course incumbent upon the railroads to do everything that is
economically possible, and practicable at all times to reduce all delays
to a minimum. I need not at this time discuss in detail what the rail
roads can and ought to do, but I am sure if the carriers and the shippers
will all co-operate very great benefit will result therefrom. The extent
of the benefit may be indicated somewhat by the fact that an average
increased movement of one mile per car per day for all of the cars in
the "United States, based upon present performance, would in effect add
100,000 cars to the available equipment ,and an average increase of one
ton per each loaded car would also add in effect 80,000 cars to the avail
able equipment."
Mr. Willard has pointed out the exact method for getting approxi
mately the service of 180,000 cars out of the present equipment. His
suggestion for co-operation should be adopted in all parts of the country,,
particularly as it is a fact that the shortage of cars is so great that it
will be months before it will be possible to secure enough cars and en
gines to take care of the peak-loads.
i Fortunately, under the new transportation act the Interstate Com
merce Commission is authorized to deal promptly and effectively with
the situation, and in view of the industrial handicap, every possible
effort Is being put forth to bring the railroad equipment up to the old
pre-war standard.
PUBLIC ASSETS AND LIABILITIES
The restriction of banking accomodations and the disposition on the
part of the public to rebel against continuing advances in prices of com
modities, represents the "movement at the top" to decrease the cost of
living. Prices and wages that were created by extraordinary conditions
lean hardly be expected by sensible people to continue forever, and there
has been plenty of evidence that the business interests of the country
have been looking for shelter from the threatening storm. Leading shoe
manufacturers of St. Louis have announced reductions of 50 cents to $2
a pair in wholesale prices. Following the demobilization last year a
large part of p.toma BttfoVedpp. on clotafejfi so "that it 1 artinec-
essary for them to make heavy purchases this year. The result has been
that retail dealers throughout the country have been cleaning up their
stocks and at the same time withholding orders for large quantities of
supplies. Manufacturers have felt this curtailment, and they are pro
ceeding cautiously. It has made an uneasy condition which has been
reflected in unprecedented numbers of "bargain sales" in all parts of the
country.
The domestic wool market in the United States is off 20 to 30 per
cent from their high levels and carpet wools 60 to 75 per cent. Hides
and leather have had a heavy decline within the past three months.
These are items that come close to the American public.
In the broad field of industry it may be said that the best advices
received at Washington indicate that the majority of products needed in
the country are still far behind in the sense of manufacturing. Agri
cultural production is from 15 to 20 per cent below last year, but there
vill be plenty to eat.
1 On the whole public assets and liabilities show a healthy and im
proved normal condition, but the readjustment and redistribution of in
dividual effort and markets, incident to peace times are still going on.
The. country shows a disposition to get rid of the froth on the top of the
industrial bowl. And as it is being blown away a pretty substantial con
dition in, our economic beverage is being found. Evidently we are grad
ually getting back to our old gait, which was interrupted with a lot of
hop, skip and jump for two or three years.
WILL MAKE JWAPS FROM AIR
How Canadian Government Is Plan.
nlng to Locate breeding Places
of the Mosquito.
At first glance pne wouldn't say
that airplanes bore much relation to
mosquitoes. But they can be made to,
and have been made to, up In the
Fraser valley of British Columbia,
where there are great areas of low
lyng land, undeveloped and Ill
drained. Mosquitoes have become a great
pest In this region, seriously reducing
milk production. The Dominion gov
ernment, accordingly, stationed an ex
pert entomologist there last sprfng to
make a survey on which effectlve con
trol measures could be based.
Here Is where the airplane en
tered. Erle Hearle, the government
entomologist, had spent days In' sow
compilation of his mosquito map, a
device to show the location of breed
ing places.
He had tolled through marshes, and
from mountain tops, with glasses, had
taken observations. Then he thought
f the airplane.
Aerial observations proved to be
the Ideal method. "In ten minutes
aloft," declared the government ento
mologist, "I made more progress with
my map than I had In weeks on the
ground."
Mr. Hearle took a big map up with
blm In the airplane, and as mosquito
breeding places were located Indi
cated their position on the map.
British Columbia intends to use
hydroplanes to perform another Impor
tant function. Her forests are the
most extensive and valuable In Can
ada, and they cover an undeveloped
empire of thousands of square miles.
It Is proposed to use a hydroplane pa
trol system during periods of fire dan
ger. Hydroplanes are preferred to land
machines In order that Inland ponda
and lakes can be used for landing
places.
Quick Action
Last year old Slick was paying
court to Miss Smarty.
And this year he is paying her ali
mony t Baltimore American.
Home Decoration
"The painter says that before he
can redecorate this room he will have
to take all the paper off the wall."
"Why not let the baby and puppy
play here for the next day or two?"
o
The Main Thing
"That little waitress has taking
ways."
"I wish she had some fetching
ones." Baltimore American.
C. W. Herndon
ATTORNBY-AT-LAW
Kiagmam, Arinaa.
VAN MARTER
Undertaking
Parlors
FunerakDirectors
ana Embalmers
Order Taken for
Oat Flowers, Wreaths, Etc.
Agent for
Granite and Marble
Monuments
PHONE BLUE 81
jp
For the Out-of-Door Lunch
What is better than some sliced, cold
Roast Beef or Mutton
or some cold, fried
SPRING CHICKEN
Also we have all sorts
BOTTLED GOODS
pickles, relishes, etc.'
Our goods will help solve the lunchbasket
problem.
Kingman Meat Market
Blue 4
Mil HltlllMIUmilllllHI
GOLD-SILVER-CpPPER & LEAD
ffie specialize in Mining Securities
All Markets Listed or Unlisted
t Correspondence invited l ,
W. W. ALLER 8C COMPANY
People's Bank Bldg., Pittsburgh, Penn.
I.Siili I lit.i....-Mi. iiiii)iitl..)-tt.,.()l,t,i,,.t.tt(,4,(lt I I i i 1 n 1 1
CHLORIDE HOTEL DVI i
Looking for a pleasant place to tay while in Chloride 7 You will fiad
it at the Hotel Davis, on main corner in Chloride. Best accomodations.
MADAM DAVIS, Prop. "
CAP WALKER
SUMNER BEECHER
ERIE KOHLEB
UNITED STAGES
OFFICE: BEALE HOTEL LOBBY. PHONE BLUE 147
BONDED CARS COMPETENT DRIVERS
Car Leaves Kingman for Oatman 8:30 A. M.
Returning, Leaves Oatman 2:00 P. M.
KINGMAN WATER COMPANY
SOLICITS YOUR WATER BUSINESS
Pure Spring Water
Trouble Man, Joe Chambers Red 20
THE NEW HOTEL BEALE
KINGMAN, ARIZONA.
FINEST HOTEL IN NORTHERN ARIZONA.
New and modern ia every respect. Fireproof build
lar. Roams tingle or ea smite, with or without bath.
Hat and cold water ia ererj room. Steam heat
Large sample rooms.
Rates $1.00 and Up
THOMAS DEVINE ::
: ::
Proprietor
10SANGEIESHOTEL
(lllw
XffHsnfley
IEE,
6lhSFluUER0AS"
W1R CLARK Rno
IDtporCarjPajsTTitDoor
quiet, homelikp. nnn
- m , v-w-
ficiiicti, moraiiy and
Physically clean, free
from the spectacular;
an hotel you can safe
ly patronize and rec
ommend; particularly
attractive to women
.traveling alone, '
GARAGE CONNECTED
CMt NEXT DOORV"
mmmmmmmmmmmm
I GATES
I HOTEL 1
VTSTORS who know)
Los Angeles will tell you
that, despite, its excel1
lence of service and cui
ofna ?n4-Aa TTa1 vofda
are no higher than those I
of other good hotels.
Centrally located easily
and quickly accessible to
everyjpoint.,
RATES FROM'$1.50 PER DAY,
plnlnr room under hotel nnirant.
us ntllftflay. ftm. oaorflt A. coiiisi. boc.
RICHTAT(S5
riyvfiKVAv lAin
idP
Peach Springs
Trading Post
xuaupju zxsxaar hsbstavxov
B. H. CABPBNTBB,
StapU Qroearlw, Lunch Gtoodt, Bott
Drloka, Trait, Clean, Tobaooo,
Baa Crown Gasoline, Zerolon
Ofl.
PBACH 8PBINOS, ARIZ.
C. B. JOHNSON
Watchmker
a 'n d
JEWELER
KIK6MAH, ARIZWfA
THE MAID IN
THE GARDEN
hanging out the clothes, is rath
er out of date these days, more-up-to-date
methods are now em
ployed in modern laundries. We
are fully equipped to do the beat
laundry work possible, and we.
use extreme care to see that the
clothes are not torn orN ripped.
If you want good work at reas
onable prices come to us.
Mohave Steam Laundry
ift
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