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Mohave County miner and our mineral wealth. (Kingman, Ariz.) 1918-1922, July 31, 1920, Image 2

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96060547/1920-07-31/ed-1/seq-2/

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1AGK TWO
HIE MOHAVE COUNTY MINER A NO OUR MINERAL WEALTH.
SATURDAY, JULY 31, 1920.
1
i
K
Mohave County Miner
and
OUR MINERAL WEALTH
Official Paper of Mohave County
Issued Weekly by the
MOHAVE PRINTING and PUBLISHING COMPANY
Entered as second-class matter at the postofflce at Kingman,
Mohave County, Arltonk. under Act of Congress of Mar. 1, 1 it 7 Si.
W. CI. 9AMOB ! Editor and Manager
AJTBOV M. BUXTK Mlnlnr JCdltor
Subscription rates l per year, payable in advance.
THE CAR
There is no disguising the fact that the car shortage is accasioning
serious interruptions to the normal industrial output of the country. The
Association of Raihyay Executives have issued an appeal to the public,
in which they state that the cars and locomotives at their command are
inadequate to handle the unusually large volume of business offered, and
they add that it will be impossible to overcome immediately this deficien
cy. The Executives state that "conditions require the most intensive use
of the existing facilities." To that end they have outlined a plan for se
curing the greatest possible efficiency in the distribution and use of cars,
and with the support and cooperation of the shippers they are in hopes
to prevent a repitition of the condition of congestion which marked the
operation of the lines under Government control. During that historic
epoch the theory was quite similar to that used by Oliver Wendall Holmes
in describing his "wonderful one-hoss shay," and had not private owner
ship been restored to its managerial rights we would doubtless have
found the lines soon reduced to the condition of the "shay," which took
on the appearance of "a general flavor of mild decay." But, in reality,
upon the release of the carriers from Federal control, not only were the
cars and locomotives as a whole inadequate and in an impaired state,
but also the distribution of the cars as to ownership was in such a con
dition as to prevent the greatest efficiency in their use. Imagine what
would have been the dilemma had the Government in carrying out some
of its war-eccentricities, scrambled all the farm machinery of the coun
try wherever they happened to find binders, reapers, or other machinery.
That is practically what happened to the railroads; and even today the
first impression anyone has who reads the names of the owners on the
cars of a passing freight train is tht, "I didn't realize that there were so
many different railroads in the country." The constant labor troubles
have hindered to a large extent, the return of the equipment to their
original owners; but the new wage award is expected to help settle wage
conditions and assist in the relocation of cars.
With the harvest season at hand the only relief from the difficult
condition with reference to the car shortage rests in the more intensive
use of the existing equipment. The railroad program, for which public
cooperationi'is sought, contemplates the following: An average daily
minimum movement of freight cars of not less than thirty miles a day;
an average loading of thirty tons per car; reduction of bad order cars
to a maximum of four per cent of total owned; early, and substantial re
duction in the number of locomotives now unfit for service; more ef
fective efforts to bring about the return of cars to the owner roads.
While the car performance proposed has never before been attained, it
ia believed that it can be acquired ,and that the whole remedial plan
can be carried out, if the full cooperation of the public can be secured.
THe Interstate Commerce Commission is in close touch with the rail
road plan, and Washington is rather optimistic since it has found that
there is a stern determination among railroad operators throughout the
country to mount the difficulties that confront them.
SWORDS AND PLOUGHSHARES -
When the Old Testament was written there was a passage saying,
"they shall beat their swords into ploughshares, and their spears into
pruning hooks," and while humanity is still talking over this probability,
and in order to carry it into effect arranging Leagues of Nations, with
and without reservations it remains for Uncle Sam's war office to devise
a plan to make swords and ploughshares do effective service while work
inghand in hand.
Because of the shortage of farm labor the War Department has dis
continued its recruiting work in rural communities, and future armies
are to be given courses in agriculture. The military camps are no longer
to be places where the mind of the soldier is kept constantly upon the
one subject of shooting straight, riding hard, throwing bombs, and simi
lar activities. It has been noted that the "regular soldiers" in past
years had nothing ahead of them but to re-enlist upon the expiration of
service, for the simple reason that all they knew was soldiering. They
were unfit for civil life and its occupations, and too frequently they were
merely "tough guys," because their minds had been brought to a halt
through the methods of life and the limited instruction received in
camps.
The War Department says that "the future Army will not spend a
part of the day in drill and the remainder in idleness." In order to
change this, says an official statement, "it i5 the policy of the War De
partment to make farmers of as many recruits as can by any means be
induced to adopt the profession of agriculture. The course in agriculture
taught at Army schools is under the direct supervision of experts obtain
ed from leading agricultural institutions of the country." An officer in
the Adjutant General's Office says: "It is predicted that when the coun
try becomes better acquainted with the character of the work done at
these Army schools it will recognize a constant source of supply for its
agricultural needs."
SERVICE DEMANDS TREMENDOUS
At this time there is scarcely a, central station company for electri-
city which is able to supply the demands made upon it for power for in
' dustrial uses.
In 1919 the 7,243 central station companies in the United States gen-
y erated 39,559,000,000 kilowatt hours of energy and employed over 100,-
000 men. This current was carried over more than 87,000 miles of high
tension transmission lines, serving, in addition to the many industrial
plants, more than 8,000,000 homes with light and supplying light and
power to more than 1,000,000 .business establishments. Over 5,000,000
J ' J " As to the future it Is esWhted that there yet remain in the United
f
SHORTAGE
Politics
States 14,000,000 houses to be wired for electric light, 150,000 industrial
establishments to be equipped with electric power and a possible electri
cal furnace load of tremendous proportions. With' a steady increase in
population and industrial growth, the future field of the industry seems
to be limited only by the conditions established governing its ability to
attract investors to furnish pew capital so as to make the extensions nec
essary to meet the increasing demands for service.
CANDIDATEiFOR
U. S. SENATE
Judge R. C. Stanford, whose an
nouncement as a candidate for the
United States Senate in the demo
cratic primary appeared some time
ago, was born in Buffalo Gap, Taylor
County, Texas. He came to Arizona
in the eighties, and has since been a
resident of this state.
He attended the public schools, of
Maricopa County, afterwards attend
ing the Tempe Normal School, but
was prevented from completing his
course there for the reason that when
President McKinley called for volun
teers in the Spanish-American war, I
he enlisted in the 34th U. S. Volun-1
teers, spending some two years in the
Phillippines, and was promoted for his
services to be a sergeant of his com
pany. Upon leaving the army, he took up
the study of law, qualified himself,
successfully passed the law examin
ation ,and immediately began the
practice of his profession in Bisbee,
froni which place he returned to Phoe
nix and practiced law in his home
city.
He was selected Judge of the Su
perior Court of Maricopa County in
1914, and re-elected in 1918 without
opposition in the primaries or gen
eral election. His record for fairness,
ability, impartiality and courtesy as
a judge has won for him legions of
friends in the county and state.
In order to complete his education
he worked in the mines and smelters
of Arizona.
Judge Sanford was married in 1903
to Miss Ruth Butchee of Taylor Coun
ty, Texas. They have six children.
He is a self-made man, qualified
and worthy of your support. His cit
izen record is good, his soldier record
is good and his judicial record is good.
ARIZONA STATE
ROAD BUILDERS
END FIRST JOB
PHOENIX, Ariz., July 28. The
opening of the Tempe-Mesa highway
marks the first hard surfaced road in
the State tot be built and completed
under the direct supervision of the
State Highway Department.
The initial'unit of this road begins
three miles east of the Phoenix city
limits and leading to the town limits
of Tempe was finished by the State
forces last year. The road is design
ed to carry the heaviest traffic in the
State. One thousand vehicles pass
over it in a day. It forms an impor
tant link in the Bankhead highway
system. There are now a total of
forty miles of permanent surfacing on
the Bankhead route in Arizona.
The Wise Father
Absent-Minded Professor meeting
his son, "Hello, George how's your
father?" Harvard Lampoon.
LOSANOEIfSHOTEL
thSFIuUEROAS"
ftBB CLARK R.
IIDCfotCtoPauTheDMr
QUi'et. homelilfp rm
genial, morally and
Physically clean, free
from the spectacular;
an hotel you can safe
ly patronize and rec
ommend; particularly
attractive to women
traveling alone, '
GARAGE CONNECTED fAAZZ
CW Mnrr nona $l"te$4'
mixoFmm
AIM witf
- -.-. - m
IEE.
UDluUUuini
JiB single y
!.
Essential Knowledge
The Wife "What do men know
about women's clothes?"
The Husband (bitterly): "The
price. London Opinion.
Lion Attacks Trainer.
Sioux City, Iowa. Fred Delmar,
owner of a wild animal act, suffered
a badly lacerated arm and other in
juries when attacked by a lion In a
cage at the fnlr grounds here. The
attack was made after Delmar had
jabbed at the lion with a fork. While
the lion was chewing Del mar's arm
the trainer gave a mighty lunge, throw
ing the animal off, and then ran from
the cage.
Suffragists May Take Appeal.
Burlington, Vt. If the suffrage
amendment is not soon ratified by the
thirty-sixth state, Vermont suffragists
will appeal to the United States Su
preme Court to declare illegal Gov
ernor Clements' veto of the presiden
tial suffrage bill passed by the Ver
mont Legislature last year. This was
announced In a statement from suf
frage state headquarters.
After Rum Runners.
Windsor, Ontario. Reports that nu
merous small craft from the American
side of the Canadian river, believed to
be engaged In "rum running" are oper
ating at night without lights and with
out permission led to an order by A.
X. Montreull, collector of customs,
placing a special patrol on the Canadi
an side.
C. W. Herndon
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Kingman, Ariaona.
VAN MARTER
Undertaking
Parlors
Funeral Directors
and Embalmers
Orders Taken for
Oat Flowers, Wreaths, Etc
Agent for
Granite and Marble
Monuments
PHONE BLUE 81
VISITORS who know
TjOft AnoralpQ Will fall Will
that, despite its excel.'
lence of service and cui
sine, Gates Hotel rates
are no higher than those
of other good hotels.
Centrally located easily
and quickly accessible to
everyjpoint.
RATES FROM Ti.50 PER DAY.,
piolif room und.r hotel raiotc.ment.
L .. n.nwi, rrw. urnrv. a. vwimi, etc
RIGHTlATe
FICUEROAflXTH
Breakfast
Bacon
There are many
brands of bacon
and more than
one of the many
are good, but
there is only one best, and that is
the one .you want. You will find it at
our market. We sell it in either sides
or sliced as you prefer. It has a rep-
w
utation for quality
of this, community.
KINGMAN MEAT MARKET
I. M. GEORGE, Prop.
GOLD-SILVER-COPPER & LEAD
5e specialize in Mining Securities
All Markets Listed or Unlisted
Correspondence invited
W. W. ALLER & COMPANY
People's Bank Bldg.,lEjttsburgh, Penn.
t
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CHLORIDE HOTEL DAVIS
Looking for a pleasant place to stay while in Chloride ? You will find
it at the Hotel Davis, on main corner in Chloride. Best accomodations.
MADAM DAVIS, Prop.
CAP WALKER
SUMNER BEECHER
UNITED STAGES
OFFICE: BEALE HOTEL LOBBY. PHONE BLUE 147
N
BONDED CARS COMPETENT DRIVERS
Car Leaves .Kingman for Oatman 8:30 A. M.
Returning, Leaves Oatman 2:01 P. M.
KINGMAN WATER COMPANY
. SOLICITS YOUR WATER BUSINESS
Pure Spring Water
Trouble Man, Joe Chambers Red 20
THE NEW HOTEL BEALE
KINGMAN, ARIZONA.
FINEST HOTEL IN NORTHERN ARIZONA.
New and modern in ever)' respect. Fireproof build
ing. Reema single or ea smite, with or without bath.
Het' and cold water In erery room. Steam heat.
Large sample rooms.
Rates $1.00 and Up
THOMAS DEVINE
::-
:
Peach Springs
Trading Post
Kvaauraz zvdxajt bssbbvactoh
K. aL CaRPEfTiat,
Vxvp.
Staple QroMrtu. Lunch Qkod., Soft
Drinks, rrvlt, Clnn, Tobaeoo,
Bad Crown Carolina, Eerolon
PIACH SPRINGS, ARE.
J Unfa ' 'jKiMfiM
;2agji Bfi
V -
with the pcoplevX
(
Phone Blue 4
......,.... ..
ERIE KOHLER
it-
Proprietor
C. B. JOHNSON
WatcWer
a 'n d
JEWELER
KIN6MAN, ARIZONA
THE MAID IN
I THE GARDEN
hanging out the clothes, is rath
er out of date these days, more
up-to-date methods are now em
ployed in modern laundries. We
are fully equipped to do the beat'
laundry work possible, and we.
use extreme care to see that the
clothes are not torn or ripped.
If you want good work at reas
onable prices come to us.
Moteve Steam Laimtty
i
i
A'
1
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X
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V
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