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Mohave County miner and our mineral wealth. (Kingman, Ariz.) 1918-1922, August 07, 1920, Image 2

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96060547/1920-08-07/ed-1/seq-2/

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AGK TWO
IJJE MOHAVE C'OI NTY- MINl'.R AM) nrtJ MINERAL WEALTH.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 7, 1920.
Mohave County Miner H
and
Our. Mineral Wealth
i
Official Papr of Mohave County
Issued Weekly by the
MOHAVE PRINTING and PUBLISHING COMPANY
Entered as second-class matter at the postdfflce at Kingman.
Mohave County, Arliona, under Act of Congress of Mar. 1, 1S79.
" . SAXON Editor and Manager
AXIOM JC. SIOIH Mining- Editor
Subscription rates IS per year, payable In adance.
NEWSPRINT HAS ADVANCED 500 PER CENT
nr r : in a jt-jskzw. t - --
The End of a Perfect Day J j Zfifcz - NOV hJnf7i
vi yVvr'fla e ifo 9J B aHi skKsi v Ml Ifflil Offl PAul B HI ' LI
A current report of the Government Forest Seivice says that the
larger newspaper publishers of the country have been able to keep down
the advance in cost of their newsprint to about 200 per cent because of
their ability to contract in large volume. But the market price, accord
ing to the bulletin, has advanced 500 per cent since 1915. It is at this
price that the small publisher is compelled to buy his paper stock.
Primarily the reason for the advance in paper is due to a wood short
age. In earlier days the paper mills were built in the lumber regions
and their pulp wood was a sort 6f by-product of the saw milling industry.
But in most of these regions the saw mills have finished, and they have
packed up, burned out, or moved away for some other reason. But the
paper mill cannot play the part of "carpet bagger" quite so easily, and
as a result the north-eastern part of the United States has become large
ly dependent upon Canadian wood. Spruce from Minnesota and Canada,
for example is being hauled from 700 to 1200 miles to Wisconsin paper
mills. In New York state, where nearly fifty per cent of our newsprint
is produced, sixty per cent of the pulp and paper mills have absolutely
no timber supplies of their own. New Hampshire and Maine appear to
be the only eastern states that still have ra.w materials for making paper,
and there is a well-grounded suspicion in the paper trade tht the day of
profiteering in spruce, hemlock, balsam and poplar is pretty well under
way.
The big papers, in any event, are certainly eating up the little ones,
and their "funny sheets", magazine sections and other irrelevant features
add to the tragedy of the proceedings.
v (.A ill tj IcfP i AT
elfeo. && I LI ' tp JEL?FTi"t ' w s aways tener an( flavory
j J tr U a'HfTII I l& no matter wnat the season. But Vl
u u fjf even with veal there's a difference l
, . in the flavor that's all in favor
SHAFT IS WELL PROTECTED f of the carefully raised, carefully 1
if selected stock that we carry. IF
Washington Monument Made Immune II . I
From Lightning by Scheme That II IVf B. nice Veal TOaSt for tOmOr Ml
Has Proved Its Worth. l row Qr jf y0U prefer a CUtlet Of If
m some good juicy veal chops, we jf
vk have some values that we know Ml
vk will please you. Phone orders Ml
L filled promptly. Mf
: rjlj I nil HI I llilllrSs-ifcA- "" tJtW fffjrlifilffll Ftttt
A BRIGHT MINING OUTLOOK
Mining development has been lagging during the past few months
but the future is particularly bright. There is growing demand for
metals despite the fact that restricted coppqr production with low prices
has caused many to inquire anxiously as to! the outlook for the red
metal. There appears to be little opportunity for pessimism. Silver
producers are speeding up. production and, with Uncle Sam standing
ready to purchase all the white metal produced by mines of United States
at $1 per ounce for several years to come, the silver miner has little to
worry about. It seems certain that the government will take some action
to influence the production of gold. Legislation is now pending in con
gress to portect the producers of tungsten from the cheap-labor product
of China and South America. The completion of this legislation will be
of great importance to western producers.
The world cannot go forward without mining activity and progress
of mining is in proportion to the progress of the world. When we con
sider the ever-growing electrical power development and the broadening
market for electrical appliances we note but one factor in a steadily in
creasing consumption of copper. In a few years' time we may face the
same condition in the copper market that now exists in the petroleum in
dustry. Auto truck transportation and more modern mining and" milling
equipment are already factors in the race to meet this great demand.
Minera discovery is not as easy as it once was. Metal and mineral
prices may be expected to increase materially as a consequence. Just
as the porphyry coppers, once thought to be too low grade to work, have
by improved methods become profitable, so will other metaliferous de
posits, under the stimulus of high prices, become workable.
Greater mining activity is inevitable.
LESS CHANCE FOR GLOOM
It is not easy for Americans to be pessimistic as it was in the spring.
The biggest and most vital problem, that of food, is causing less concern.
Crops have improved surprisingly in the last two months, so that there is
going to be far more wheat than anybody hoped, and apparently, too,
more corn and other grains, with fair prospects for the principal fruits
and vegetables. The sugar supply, too, has become plentiful and a little
cheaper, so that there will be less handicap than was anticipated in pre
serving perishable foodstuffs for winter use.
There remains the coal problem. And it depends largely, like many
of our other economic problems, on the transportation situation. If only
the railroads can get more cars, or what amounts to the same thing, if
their cars can be speeded up, so that crops and coal can be moved before
winter sets in, and so that merchandise of all kinds can be distributed nor
mally, Uncle Sam will have little to worry about.
There will remain politics, to be sure; but politics never troubles the
public very much when the material processes of life are functioning satisfactorily.
AUTOMOBILE PRICES
A rumor in the automobile world to the effect that prices of cars
had recently been reduced in Omaha has been found incorrect. Investi
gation shows that there have been no actual reductions in the prices of
new cars, but there is hope in the fact that proposed advances by manu
facturers have been temporarily deferred.
If farmers are concerned about the low prices they receive and are
as intelligent as they claim to be, the wonder is that they do not perfect
means of coming into direct selling contact with the consumer and there
by eliminate the middleman and his profits.
That time is swiftly approaching, if the signs and portents of the
present are to be credited, when every dollar not actively in circulation
" will be required to tell the story of its life day by day. This, of course
will discourage the idle amd yfcioua dollar.
CONTESTED CASE
ON STATE LAND IS
. APPEAlED COURT
PHOENIX, July 31. The first con
tested case for state lands in which
one of the applicants applied for a re
newal and in which the land commis
sion, in keeping with its policy of
"perpetuating leases," ruled in favor
of the old lessee, will be appealed.
Announcement was made yesterday
that Mrs. Lydia L. Fike of Naco, who
applied for a lease to land held by
Hillman and Graves, would fight the
case in the courts of the state. It is
understood that a complaint shortly
will be filed in the superior court of
Cochise county by counsel for Mrs.
Fike.
The news that the matter will be
taken into the courts will be of inter
est to the many who have condemned
the department's policy in regard to
renewals, which in question is involv
ed in the action to be brbught by Mrs.
Fike. Her case was the first decided
by the commission where there were
two applicants for the same land, one
being an applicant for the renewal.
Mrs. Fike took up a homestead ad
joining the state land in the year
1897 and engaged in the dairy busi
ness serving the city of Bisbee with
milk! At the time Mrs. Fike. located
upon the homestead there was no
town of Naco and her son drove the
first nail in the building of that town.
Commencing with her homestead
Mrs. Fike, through her industry and
thrift, purchased other lands adjoin
ing her own and increased her dairy
stock, endeavoring to take care for
the growth in the population of Bis
bee and the demand for milk. In
February of this year Mrs. Fike ap
plied to lease six sections of land
from the state which lie adjoining her
homestead and extend from her place
to the Mexican border. On the north
side she is cut off by the Mule moun
tains, and the land she has applied
for is necessary for her present use
in the development of her dairy busi
ness commenced on her homestead in
1897.
The land involved, under the lease
to Hillman and Graves, as was
brought out by testimony before the
land commission hearing a week ago,
is being used by them to fatten cat
tle brought out from Mexico.
C
MINER WANT ADS ARE BUSI
NESS WINNERS
The apex of the Washington monu
ment Is surrounded with parallel
bands. The bands are studded with
golden points. The bands are made of
gold-plated Iron n foot wide, and
the points are spaced a foot from one
another.
According to the original plan of
the monument It was protected from
lightning by an aluminum tip that was
connected with the metal framework
of the eleator. During the very first
summer after the monument was coin--pleted,
however, it was struck twice,
nnd n piece of stone wiis chipped from
the top.
Experts from all the scientific de
partments of the goernment were
called on to contrive a plan for the
hotter protection of the shaft. They
agreed on a number of Iron hands,
heavily galvanized and gold plated, to
prevent rusting.
The bands are connected with the
aluminum point of the monument, and
the framework of the elevator, and at
the base iron cables lead the electric
ity Into a deep well, where It harm
lessly expends its force. The protec
tion has proved to be perfect.
C. W. Herndon
ATTORNEYiAT-LAW
intrman, Arizona.
Quality Meats
Honest Weight
KINGMAN MEAT MARKET
I. M. GEORGE, Prop.
Phone Blue 4
U--.,..,, ,t.,.....t-t.t-.. , ...,.,,
GOLD-SILVER-COPPER & LEAD
5Ee specialize in Mining Securities '
j All Markets Listed or Unlisted
I Correspondence invited
i W. W. ALLER & COMPANY
I People's Bank Bldg., Pittsburgh, Penn.
" i hi ... r i i i i i r i i i
VAN MARTER
Undertaking
Parlors
Funeral Directors
and Embalmers
Orders Taken for
Cut Flowers, Wreathsf Etc
Agent for
Granite and Marble
Monuments
PHONE BLUE 81
CAP WALKER
SUMNER BEECHEB
ERIE KOHLER
UNITED STAGES
OFFICE: BEALE HOTEL LOBBY, PHONE BLUE 147
BONDED CARS COMPETENT DRIVERS
Car Leaves Kingman for Oatman 8:30 A. M.
Returning, Leaves Oatman 2:00 P. M.
IQSANGElfSHOTEL
ell wi
UDlUUoaui
ITBsnlPv
HsB yi
jMrZL
MMi
6thFluUER0AS!!
'for! D ft ARIf R..
IIOefotdrsPauliieDoor
DUiet. TinmoUL-i
genial, morally and
Physically clean, free
from the spectacular;
an hotel you can safe
ly patronize and rec
ommend; particularly
attractive to women
.traveling alone, "
GARAGE CONNECTED
Cm Next Door1
WiiW50FCQHm
ffl&
$Fto$4?l
f5Ey
I GATES
1 HOTEU
VISITORS who know
Los Angeles will tell you1
that, despite its excel-1
lence of service and cui
sine. Gates Hotel rates
are no higher than those II
of other good hotels.
Centrally located easily
and quickly accessible to
everyjpoint.
RATES FROM.50 PER DAY
ptnlm room under hotel mintiement.
ue mutiny. Prea. Gitm A. Ctillai. Sec.
RICHTAT(3
HGUERQA"J,!XTH
CHLORIDE HOTEL DAVIS
Looking for a pleasant place to tay while in Chloride T You will find
it at the Hotel Davis, on main corner in Chloride. Best accomodations.
MADAM DAVIS, Prop.
KINGMAN WATER COMPANY
SOLICITS YOUR WATER BUSINESS
Pure Spring Water
Trouble Man, Joe Chamberg r 20
THE NEW HOTEL BEALE
. KINGMAN, ARIZONA.
FINEST HOTEL IN NORTHERN ARIZONA.
New and modern in every respect. Fireproof build
inj. Rooms single or a suite, with or without bath.
Hot and cold water la every room. Steam heat.
Large sample rooms.
Rates $1.00 and Up
THOMAS DEVINE
-J
-Ji-
-M-
Froprietor
Peach Springs'
Trading Post
I 3BTOAiAl arOXAJT SEBEBVATIOW
B. H. CARPENTER,
Prop.
St&pU Oroerlu, Lunch Otodi, soft
Drinks, Fruit, Clean, Tobaeoo,
Bed Grown Gasoline, Zerolene
Oil.
PEACH 8PBINGS, ARIZ.
C. B. JOHNSON
Watchmker
a n d
JEWELER
KINSMAN, ARIZONA
THE MAltf IN
THE GARDEN
hanging out the clothes, is rath
er out of date these days, more
up-to-date methods are now em
ployed in modern laundries. Wa
are fully equipped to do the beat
laundry work-possible, and w
use extreme care to see that the
clothes are not torn or ripped.
If you want good work at reas
onable prices come to us.
SJHohave Steam Launtry

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