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The daily morning Astorian. (Astoria, Or.) 1883-1899, November 24, 1883, Image 1

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VOL. XX, IV0.46.
GEN. HOUSTON'S EXILE.
How the Texan Patriot Lived Among
the Cherokee.
In April, 1829, Samuel Houston,
then 36 years of agej in the full flush
of personal popularity and political
success, surprised the people of the
United States by resigning the office
of governor of Tennessee, -which he
had held for two years, by a letter of
dignified stateliness, assigning as a
reason an exigency in his personal
affairs -which he did not describe.
"What was the cause of this abandon
ment of a successful and promising
career has never been definitely dis
covered. Houston never revealed it,
so far as is known, even to his most
intimate friends, and coujeoture -was
left to invent various sensational and
romantic stories. He had been mar
ried three mouths previously, and the
most current romanco was that his
wife had confessed in a moment of
despair or irritation that she had
never loved him and that her affec
tions -were still engrossed by another.
Such a blow might havo been suffi
cient to have unhinged an ardent and
passionate nature like that of Hous
ton, never remarkable for self-control,
and it is also not impossible, although
it might be considered more extra
ordinary that a longing for the savage
lifo such as ho had experienced dur
ing his youth, had become irresisti
ble, and that no prico was too heavy
to pay for its indulgence.
There is no instance of quite so
conspicuous an
ABANDONMENT OF FORTUNE
and honor from that motive, but
there havo been many, even to this
day, in which persons of intelligence
and station have abandoned all the
hopes of a successful career and the
charms of civilized society from an
irresistible impulse to live with the
children of nature and indulge their
primitive instincts. Houston had
shown a strong bent in this direction
throughout his whole life. When a
mere lad he had left his mother's
cabin in the mountains of Tennessee
and lived for five years with his
friends and neighbors, the Chero
keeSj learned their language, which is
so difficult that no adult person is
said to have ever acquired it, and
thoroughly adopted their ways and
customs. Tradition says that he had
been adopted into the family of a
chioft and at any rate his courage,
aotivity, and companionable qualities
made hun a favorite as well as a tol
erated resident of the tribe. After ho
had left them and returned to civili
zation, in his early manhood, he
shared a campaign with them, a con
siderable force of Gherokees acting as
allies to Jackson's army in the Creek
war, and they had seen his acts of
desperate valor in the charge upon
the last fastness of the defense at the
battle of the Horse Shoe. At any
rate, whatever the cause of the aban
donment of his career, it was with his
old friends and companions that he
sought refuge and seclusion.
Having settled up his affairs in
Tennessee, ho descended the river to
Cairo, then a small trading post,
where he fitted up a small flat-boat
with whisky and Indian goods, and
floated down the Mississippi to the
mouth of the Arkansas. After a long
and laborious voyage up the river he
finally reached the mouth of the
Bayou Illinois, a small stream flow
ing into it about thirty miles below
Fort Gibson. Here was situated the
original town and council house of
the tribe, and here was the home of
his friend, the principal chief, known
by the English name of John Jolly.
He took up his abode with the
chief, putting on the Indian dress
and adopting all their habits and
manners. Living witnesses among
the Cherokees havo seen tho old chief
and Houston seated on the earthen
floor of the cabin, by the wooden
trough of lia-nau-ha-nu, hominy
cooked to the consistency of paste,
which always stood in the center,
and feeding each other in tho aborig
inal fashion -of friendliness with the
common spoon; and, .although as
suming too much dignity for the ball
plays and sports, ho took part in all
the occupations of hunting and fish
ing, and was, to
AI.Ii INTENTS AND TDBPOSES,
a Cherokee brave. Houston had
more than one natural characteristic
of the Indian besides his fondness
for wild life, and particularly shared
their fondness for barbaric display
and theatrical effect He may have
been as careless and slatternly as
they when lounging about the cabin
or on ordinary occasions, but at tho
council or any gathering of the tribe
he arrayed himself in all the pictur
esque habit of the Indian brave. The
Cherokees did not paint themselves
like their neighbors, the Osages,
and the other plains Indians, but
maintained at this period their bar
baric dress of buckskin hunting shirt,
leggings and moccasins, and adorned
their locks with the feathers of the
eagle and the wild turkey. On occa
sions of state, Houston arrayed him
self with the best. He has been des
cribed as wearing, in full dress, a
wliiie hunting-shirt brilliantly em
broidered, yellow leggings and mocca
sins elaborately worked with beads,
and a circlet of turkey feathers for
his head. He lot his hair grow and
braided it in a long -Jqueue, and wore
his beard upon Ms chin in a "goa
tee," shaving the rest of his face.
The Indians are very quick to ridi
cule any tricks of ways and manners.
and Houston's theatrical dignity and
splendor did not escape their satire.
on one occasion, at a council meet
ing, they arrayed a negro in a carica
rare of his atiro and stationed him.
behind his seat, where he imitated
his pose and manner, to tho crreat
glee-of tho assembly. Houston bore
the presence of his imitator with a
shrewed indifference, and the joke
was not repeated.
Houston remained an intimate of
the cabin of his friend, John Jolly,
for more than a year, and was regard
ed as hk adopted son. It was here
that he fell iniove with a Cherokee
woman named Tyenia Rogers. She
was a half-breed of great personal
fee&uty, aad ae tell and stately for her
mc as How ton himself, with her
he took up as his wife, and removed
to tho west of the Grand river, oppo
site Port Gibson, where he made a
clearing, which still remains, and
erected a log cabin, which was burnt
during tho war. He maintained him
sel by "keeping a small trading store,
and, as usual, after the Indian fash
ion, by a little slatternly fanning and
careless stock raising. He was not
more ambitious or industrious than
his Indian associates, and at this
period his habits reached their lowest
point of self indulgence. It was not
to be supposed that his belter in
instincts and capabilities could al
ways remain contont with the narrow
interests and
DEGRADING HABITS OF SAVAGES,
however strong tho barbaric elements
in his nature, or however severe the
blow that had rendered civilized life
for a time intolerable to him. The
thoughts of the possibilities of his
abandoned career must have obtrud
ed themselves upon him with more
andmoro persistent regret, and the
degradation and failure of his lifo
been felt with keener poignancy as
the years went by.
To the unhappmess and degrada
tion of this life there came a hope of
relief and redemption in the news of
the stirring of national life in Texas,
and the combined eagerness for the
foundation of a new empire and of a
resistance to a degrading domination
among its American settlers. All the
adventurous spirits of the border
were attracted by the scent of war
fare and the hope of fortune, and a
small party was formed of the daring
rovers in the Indian Territory.
Houston joined this, and naturally
became the leader, although he was
so poor at the time that ho had to
take his departure on a small pony
unfit to carry his weight, which was
finally exchanged by the good-will of
ono of his associates, for a more pre
sentable horse. He did not at once
conquer his feeling of degradation
and hopelessness, but remained for
sometime with a small settlement of
Cherokees upou the lied River before
going forward to Texas. Perhaps de
prived of tho opportunity for indul
gence, his manly qualities strength
ened themselves, or the news of the
imminence of the struggle with Mex
ico sml further fired his spirit, and
ho finished his journey with such re
sults as are familiar to hislop.
That he sincerely loved his Indian
wife is made evident by the fact that
when he had established himself and
won fame and honor in Texas, he
sent for her to join him, but she re
fused to leave her people and famil
iar life, and died after a few years in
the house ho had made. He left
NO INDIAN CHILDREN,
but the family of his wife was a largo
and notable one, and his nephews
and nieces are numerous in the tribe,
some of them distinguished by their
influence and intelligence. To his
credit, Houston never forgot his
friendship with the Cherokees or en
deavored to ignore his life among
them. After his election to the
United States Senate he was fervont
in advocating their interests and in
defending them from injustice. Not
only as the special champion of Una
tribe, but in an intelligent under
standing of the Indian question, and J
the wisdom as well as the justico of .
honesty and consideration, he was far
beyond the majority of the public
men of his time, and particularly of
the spirit of border greed and preju
dice, which is by no means yet ex
tinct Like some of the armv officers
who had shared, their fears and
learned to admire their bravfrv and
:!. r..i . i. r ".r n. !
uu uiuu.e,iiu u iu liinm uL I
Indian from sympathy as well as a
sense oi tipngutness ana nonor, ana
respected their barbaric virtnes as he
. , -, , . . - !
understood the elements of their .
cnaracter. Jlis rooms were aiwavsi
open to the Cherokee delegation when 1
Uieyarnveu in wasuington, anil ne
was their friendly companion as well 1
as thfi Khtirorof llieir mnnni s nnd
... i i i. -r V -n I
their advocate at the Indian Bnroau l
and on the floor of Congress. His
regard was repaid with lastiug rerer- i
uuvu. aav uhq t uwuiAu& xii luc '
remembrance and tradition of the
Cherokee people as their faithfnl and ;
poweriui menu, ana nis name is per
petuated as an honorable patronymic j
in the younger generations, like that
of William penu!
Hale's Hoxev of DonKiiorxD and
Tau for coughs and colds has reached
the pinnacle of fame.
Pike's Toothache Deops cure in
one minute.
A. V
en,
Wholesale and Bclail Dealer in
MILL FEED.
Glass and Plated Ware,
TKOriOAL AXD DOMESTIC
FSUiTS AMD VEGETABLES.
Together with
Vftnss, Liq'Jors,Tobacco.Sifj2rs
Mrs T.W. Eaton. Mlas Florence Caniahan.
EATON & CAiMHAN,
DEALERS IV
Fine Millinery
AND
Fancy Goods.
Cass -Street, next door to Odd Fellows
BaUAing'. . ' .
ASTORIA, OREGOX SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1883.
7&: U
fife . -
mm
ivt y?i
v J3 :
This powder never varies. A. iiiarvol o
purity, strenstli and vli3lesoineness. More
economical than tho ordinary kinds, and
cnnnnl Ik sold in competition with the niMl
litudtf of low test short weight, alum or
phosphate twiwders. SuldonUiitt caw. ttov
AI. ItAKINR POWDKK Co.. 106 Wall-Si. N. Y.
New Store, New Stock,
Toys, Fancy Coods,
Tobacco and Cigars.
rOKEIOX AND DOMESTIC
IP TJ X "3? &
A FINE ASSORTMENT.
Souoinoqua street, nest door to the Empire
Store. nlT-ma
LOEB & 00.
JOBBERS IX
WINES.
LTQUOES,
AND
CIGARS.
AGENTS VOU. TIIE
Best San Francisco Houses and
Eastern Distilleries.
Tumblers Decanters, and All
4.
Kinds of Saloon Supplies.
57A11 goods sold at Sun FrancUrn Trices.
aiATN STItEET,
Opposite Tarkcr House. Astoria, Oregon,
King
Blood
Is not a "cvrcall." it is a blood-purifier and
tonic Impurity of the Wood poisoiuTthe sys-
duces many disorders, known hv diflerent
iein, uenuige mo circui&uon, aim urns in
names to ilt3tinnilsh them aeeonlhu? In of-
lects, hot lein-lv hninc'iM or phases of
that proat wuT-ric disorder. Impurity oi
uhsoh. &uwi are ijyiKpia, iiMvtMt,
iV.w& S3i!Xi -i .i
onicr. llauuwM. Bacl.achc, General JJ aik-
n jcart Disease, Dmj,tj. KUncu l)iawe.
nw, uneumaum, caiarrn, scrotnia, SKin
"J'JfJSSiSh f
cure tli-e hv attncfclmr the cnW. Immiritv
rthe t'.o.l. Chemistsand physicians agree
wK " uiriwwi genuine ami einrieiu
preparation tor tne purpose." JSouiuyDrug
t,ut -si i.nti L. tim,.ti mJZ.
tions, &, in pamphlet, "Treatise on Diseases
PI H r?$
1 Mill II. O .1 . V,
-
715. EDGAR,
Dealer in
tu--,
Cigars, QD3CCG and bigareties
Meerschaum and Brier Pipes,
GENUINE ENGLISH CUTLERY
Revolvers and Cartridges.
ASK FOlt
Union India Rubber Co's
Pure Tara Gum
CRACK PROOF
RUBBER BOOTS.
11EWARE OF IJ1ITATIOVS !
Kesnrethe Boots are stamped CRACK
PROOF on the heels, and have the PURE
gum tsriiiAGS ou the toot ami instep,
winch prevent tnetr ckickuuj or oreainnc.
We are now making them witti RUBBER
AXD ASBESTOS Soles which will make
them last more than twice as long as any
ikuuuer noois man
FOlt SALE BY ALT. DEALERS.
ALL KINDS KUBBRK BELTIJMJ. PACK
ING. IIOSK. SPRINGS, CLOTHING,
BOOTS AND SHOES. Etc
COODYEAR RUBBER CO.
U. 11. PEASE. .Tr. I Acenu.
S. M. BUNYON, f San Erauclsco.
PLUMBING,
Gas and Steam Fitting
DONE BY UUDDOCK & "YHEELE1. AT
fair rates. Also a complete stock of
goods m otu Hue. Lstunatcs given anu
worK guaranteed.
Cass street, in rear of I 0 O F building,
ext to Gas Co's oQlcc.
NOTICE
T 0 CANNERYHEN !
T WILL ilAKE BOXES NEXT SEASON
X lu any amount required, and guarantee
to have them satlsfsct rv in even respect.
My price for shooks will he 13 cents; for
nailed boxes 17 cents. Anyouo wUhing to
make a contract for cases can comer wun
J.C.TKULLINGEK.
oct4-3m Proprietor "West Shore Mills.
For lame Back Side or Chest uso
fifiilnli'a Pnmno "PlactT "PrIPO X PTitQ.
5!
""I
Absolutely Pure.
of the
For sale by W. E. Demet,
Wilson & Fisher,
SHIP CHANDLERS.
DEAf.KUS IN
Iron, Steel, Coal, Anchcrs, Ghains,
TAR, PITCH, OAKUM,
N AILS AND SPIKES.
Shelf Hardware, JPaints and Oils
STEAfr PACKING,
PRCVESiOHS-
Agents for Salem Flfurjng- ruls,
and Capital Flour.
CAPDftMtQ Q
T tin nn
l niiiunnuu
SCALES.
All sizes, at Portland Trices, in Stock.
'onier Cheiianms antl Hamilton Street';
ASTORIA. OREGON.
5
H. D. QUAY.
Wholesale and retail dealer In.
GROCERIES, FLOUR, AND FEED
Hay, Qats, Straw, Wood, Etc.
LIME, SAND. AND CEMENT.
General storaae aud V."harface ou reason
sole terms. Kk: of It"i ton street. Atin .
Oiveoii.
22, -Sw
UK.Vr.RU IX
Ha3r, Oats, Straw.
LimB, Srick, Cement and Sand
Wo(x! Eel!veietl to Order.
Praying, Teaming and Express Business.
Horses ana Carriages for Hire.
DKALEJt IX
WIHES, LIQUORS AfiD CIGARS.
PIANOS
AND-
EG AN
SMALL MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
OF ALL KINDS.
FINEST VIOLIN STRINGS,
iar.o, end Organ Instructors.
-cei.ei;i:ati:ij-
STICK & KNABE PIAIOS !
USED BY
Prssident of United States'
"Governor of Oregon,''
Astoria Musical Society.
Mrs. J. W. Conn, of Astoria,
Ami other prominent jierson?. l'iunos and
Organs of many leadiuu nuikes,
wholesale and retail,
including
CELEBRATED- TABER ORGANS.
AS lVOXDKItTIj
LITTLE GIANT STECK PIANO
Largos?. House 011 Tiii3 Coast.
asdne:
jsros.,
165 First St... Portland. Oregon.
THE BEST
Boarding and Lodging House.
Chas. Wallman has opened a boarding and
lKlging house south of O'Brien's hotel, near
the sas works.
The table is supplied with the; best the
market affords : kuhI food and clean beds
will be furnished at the regular prices.
Give me a call and satlslv vourselve.
ciiaS. wallman.
S. ARNDT & JFERCI1EN.
ASTORLV. - OREGON.
The Pioneer Machine Shop
blacksmith "JS
shop
Boiler Shop
All hinds of
ENG-INEj CANNERY,
AKD
STEAMBOAT WOBS
Promptly attended to.
A specialty made of repairing
CANNERY DIES,
FOOT OF LAFAYETTE STREET.
Brewery Beer Saloon.
The Best Beer 5 cts a Glas3.
Hot Lunch every pay from 10 to 12. A. M
The heat of Liquors and Cicara on hand.
A deservedly popular piace 01 social resort.
GEO. HELLER.
P.USLN'ESS CARDS.
Q U. THOMSOK,
Attorney and Connselor at Law,
Xoora No. C, over White House,
ASTOKIA, OREGON.
.?.
XAT. HCDsiO.V.
tturney &t Law, and Sotaxy
Public.
Odd Fellows Bulldm;, Astoria, Orejoo,
c. vr. FULTOX.
O. O. FQXTOX'.
FULTOX BBOTHEBS,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
Koouu 5 and C. Odd Fellows Building.
J O.A. ISO 1j It Y.
AlTORNKY AT ULW,
Chnainus tr. et, - - ASTOBIA, OBECKW
O.
K.31cACHRA.X.
Attorucy at Lair.
Kooin 4, Whlto llouso.
0.
ATT'Y AT LAW.
Vntnrv PnhHe CnmniLssloner of Deeda for
California. New York and Washlngtoa Ter
ritory. Rooms 3 and -1. Odd Fellows Building, As
toria. Oregon.
X. R -Claims at Washington. D. a, and
collections aspeciauy.
V. AIjIjKN,
AHtoria ApeHt
Kamburg-Magdeburg
and German-American
Fliin INSURANCE COMPANIES.
B. -
XIOI.DK.V,
OTAKY PUBLIC,
AUCTIONEER, COMMISSION AND IN
SURANCE AGENT.
Q.KLO h 1MRKKR,
SURVEYOR OF
Clutrtoi County, and City ef Aaterlt
gttice:-Chenamus street, Y. M.C. A. hall
Room No. 8.
jT)R. X. V. XXOAT3IAX.
Physician and Surgeon.
Rooms 9 and 10, Odd Fellows Building,
ASTORIA, OREGON.
JAY TUTTJjK. 21. .
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Offick Rooms 1,2, and 3. Pythian Build-
np.
Residk'ck Over J. E. Thomas Drug
Store.
P.p-
?ENTIST,
ASTORL,
OREGON
Rooms in Allen's building up stairs, corner
01 cass anu iqemocune stres .
jk. j. . iaforcc,
EXTIST,
Room it. Odd fc Hows Building, Astoria, Or.
(las administered for palnlesj extraction
01 teem.
MUSIC.
PROF. T. F. MEYER.
Graduate of Heidelberg University.
Iiiiiio Teacher.
CEHERAL STEAMSHIP AGENCY.
bins or exchange on any
Part oi Europe.
U Ail- AGKNT FOR TIE FOLLOWING
X welt k;unvu and commodious ataamahlp
1 a ps.
STATE Li XE. "RED STAR.
WHITE STAR.
HAMBURG-AMERICAN,
DOMINION LINE,
NATIONAUaud AMERICAN LINE.
Prepaid tickets to or from any European
port.
For full information as to rates of fare
sailing days, etc, apply to '
I. "W. CASE.
GEO. I WHEELER.
Notary Public
HT. I BOBB.
WHEELER & ROBB.
GENERAL
Eeal Estate i InsnrancB Aeents
"We have very desirable property in As
toria and Upper Astoria for sale. Also, One
farms througtiout the county.
Accounts carefully adjusted and collec
tloiis made.
Vie represent the
Iloj-al, Xorwicli Uniea aad Xiasea
sntre msuraaco te's
Wltlia eomhlned capital of S.16,000,e00,
TUK
Traveler Life aHil Aeeldent iHSKr-
anre Co ,- 01 Jiartlord, anatne3Kaa
hattan Ijlfe InMurance Co.,
of New York.
We are asents for the Dally and Weekly
XorlhiceJ'l Xcm, and the Oregon Vidette.
All business entrusted to our care will xe-
C. H. BAIN & CO.
DEAtXCS IX
Doors, Windows, Blinds, Transoms
Turning, Bracket Work.
Worls.
A specialty, and all work guaranteed.
Oak, Ash, Bay, and Walnut lumber ; Or'
Kon and Port Orford Cedar.
All kinds of boat material on hand,
c. s. baui cm
POSTPONE
YOUR PURCHASES!
Till I
INCREASING BUSINESS DEMANDS
NewG
TILL MY RETURN FROM SAN FRANCISCO
The Following Prices Hold Good:
5 Gents Each.
Fireside Companion. N. Y. "Weekly Ledger. Saturday Niffht,
Arm Chair, Family Story Paper,
Texas Sittings', S. F. Chronicle, Call,
etc., etc.
8 Cts., 3 lor 25
Police Gazette, Police News,
Judge, Harper's Bazaar and "Weekly, Leslie's "Weekly and Chimney
Corner, Argonaut, and many others.
I have printed tickets for those papers to make exact chanp-e.
Back numbers always on hand.
25 Gents.
Leslie's
Young
30 CentS. Harper's
Having made arrangements
give the public a benefit of the above named reductions I havo also
REDUCED the price for Subscriptions, which. will be as follows:
Harper's Weekly, per year $3.75 not $4 00
" Bazaar, 3.75 " 4.00
" Monthly " 3.50 " 4.00
All three for . 10.00 " 12.00
Leslie's "Weekly, per year ; 3.75 " 4.00
Leslie's Chimney Corner, per year , . . . . 3.75 " 4.00
" Popular Monthly " 2.85 " 3.00
Fireside Companion 2.75 " 3.00
New York Ledger . 2.75 " 3.00
Saturday Night 2.75 " 3.00
Family Story Paper 2.75 3.00
Arm Chair 2.75 3.00
S. F. Argonaut 3.75 " 4.00
Puck 4.50 " 5.00
And all others too numerous to mention at tho same rates. Now is
your time to subscribe for the coming year. Remember Carl Adler's
Subscription News Depot.
ABLER STILL HOLDS' THE FORT
Xoo2s at This !
All the follonlu? fine cloth bound Books gilt edge, Ecd Line edition, formerly $1.50 at
:enti. POE31H-Bulwer Lvtton. Camnbell. SDonner. Hemans. Tennvson. Hood.
Moore, Jean Ingelow. Crabb, Pope, Shakespeare, fioldsmlth, Chaucer. Coleridge, Luetic,
DryBnjilacaulay, Scott, Schiller. Milton, Keats, Kirk, White, Uoss. Thompson, Herbert,
AAJ iiUUWUiO,l 1 AUlbf Ut-UIU.it JJiUbVU UCitUf Ability II UilL, UUJOi lUUIUUUliUUClki
Ayton, woodworth, Longfellow, Holmes. Bayard Taylor, Shelby, Itodgers, Barns, Cooper,
ana many, many more.
Fine line of Hotels and Gift Books, richly bound, formerly $1.30 now only 75 cents.
Tom Brown's School Days, Tour of the World, The Fur Country. Five Weeks In a Balloon,
Anderson's Fairy Tales, Arabian Niehts. Young Crusoe, Tales from Shakespeare, Don
Quixote, Gem.", Household Stories, Dick Rodney. Aesops Fables. Last Days of Pompeii,
Koblnson Crusoe, Bob Boy, The Midshipman. Daring Deeds. French Fancy Tales, The
PrlTateersman, Young Forester, Peter tnt Whaler, and hundreds more.
XiOW
Erery article of mr new, fine selected stoek will be sold at priees that will DEFY
Atli COMPETITION.
Books, Stationery, and Notions In endless
Watches, Clocks and Jewelry, Rodger Bros. Silverware, as Knives, Forks and Spoons,
Castors, cups. Tea aets, etc, etc, wiu De i
PIANOS AND ORGANS cf the best makers very Low fer Cash, or ea aay
iBStallaaeRt.
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS of every description. Sheet Music and Music Instructors
of the latest publications. 100 new Music Books Just received from the East.
TOYS!
The finest assortment of Toys, "Wagons, Velocipedes, Baby Carriages,
etc., etc., can only be found at Adler's well known Crystal Palace.
Enabled by many years of experience I succeeded in selecting & stock of goods whloh
will suit young and old.
I mean to do a square, honest business, giving full value for every, dime recaived.
Polite clerks will be found In attendance and no trouble to show goods.
BEXEXJtER X WJjLIi NOT BE rXDEB8LD,
Crystsil
Carl Adler,
ASTORIA IRON WORKS.
BrSTOH STKBIT, NBXB PABKXS HOUflB,
ASTORIA, - OREGON.
GENERAL MACHINISTS AND
BOILER MAKERS.
LAND ao3 M ATM El
BoilerWork, Steamboat Work
and Cannery Work a spe
cialty. Of all peseriptlMB mae t Order
at Skert 9Ttlce.
A. D. Wjlss, President.
J. G. Hurrx.ix,Secrtrr,
L W. Cask, Treaiurer.
4H roz.Sap4riaMit.
PRICE, FIVE CENTS.
Return. -
ootls:
Boys of New York, "Weeks Doings,
Uregoman, News and Astomax,
Cts.. 13 for $1.00.
Illustrated Times, Puck, "Wa3p, and
Popular Monthly,
Ladies Journal, etc
Monthly, etc.
with all publishers I ara enabled to
variety. A fine display of Gold and Silver
isros. aurerware, as iuiives.xc
sold cheaper than anywhere else.
Proprietor.
STOE & DAYIBSOH
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Dealers In
LUMBER,
HAY,
GRAIN,
POTATOES,
AND
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
Advtncts mtdi4)n Consignmintt.
.-2 -rf;

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