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Farmers' champion. (Elgin, Okla.) 1912-1922, November 14, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by Oklahoma Historical Society

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96087587/1912-11-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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Sttccette to Indian Champion
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ELGIN, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, IM2
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-,;: Lumber Company
Dttler in . .
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Building
Grain, Cotton, Coal.
Bet t Mexico Coal
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The Bank That
Bank of Elgin
Elgin. Oklahoma
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Deposits Guaranteed'
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If you are not already our customer, open an
. account without delay. . v
A, L. McPherson, Pres.. 0. A, McPherson,. V. P.
E. McPuehson, Cashier.
fc
WE OFFER
v THE FOLLOWING:
8 boxes matches..
a cans kraut
.8 sani, hominy-..
S 1-pound pkn Eagle Thistle
Ipkf S.Washington Urisp
x mm Oream of .Wheat
m. - T".M.
S.pkffi fraee-nuUi . , .
2 25c bakirtf powder. .
65c plcge tobaeeo;. ., .
8 lOe pkrs teeacea .'v.
a.psn eraM-nuie
lb pounoe susjer., ........
Kaw Syrup 'parfsjioq . . . .
Fieur. Met 4t. '- ,...;.
;eart. laUMry tpae.
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Soda .?..,. .25
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Senator Thomat- P. Gore, the
.ir: - '"
Did, Much to Secure Woodrow Wilson' Nomination
I ftjNDER the title of '"
, Political Armies," M
Munsey's
say about the part taken by pur
Gore, in securing the nomination
W
bovs' used to refer to Gore as
... ..jwlbfthe Bght frtjV nnmmation.phwrnintMqCombljai
heln of one of he mflst- far-sivrhted blindtmkh' that ever'fltrured
a nolitical situation. Senator Thomas P. Gore of Oklahoma.
his function, during the pre-convention contest, to answer all ques
tions, decide all policies and dictate moves when nobody else, had
the wisdonvqr the nerve to do it. The truth is that this man Gore
is just about the biggest political personality the current campaign
has developed. He is only forty-two years old. and although total
ly blind since' he was cleyen years old, he accomplished the won
derful feat of fighting his way into the United States Senate before
he was thirty-seven. He became a Wilson supporter early, staked
all his political capital on his. judgment, never hesitated or waver
ed, never doubted that success would come and contribed more to
winning' the fight, I suppose, than any other one man. save Wilson
himself or W. J. Bryan. It was Gore, more than anybody else,
who convinced Bryan that he ought to take up the Wilson cause
and make those wonderful assaults which at regular intervals stood
the Baltimore convention on its head, and each time shook down a
new bunch of delegates for Wilson, till at last the nomination had
been shaken down."
Indian Fair Echoes
In the educational training of
the southwest tribes of Oklaho
ma, the newest departure was
the recent establishment of an
Indian fair at Lawton, at which
agricultural products, live stock
and industrial products of the
Indians, old and young, could be
exhibited in competition for va
rious prizes, and in which; with
practical examples before them,,
writes a correspondent to the Ok
lahoman, the Indians dan be in
duced to discuss the best methods
in production.
The idea was conceived only a
few weeks .ago suggested by
the unusual interest manifested
in 'theComariche Indian school
exhibit at the state fair-but
When the date arrived it had al
ready aroused such interest that
the fair attendance for the two
days registered fully 8,000. Al
most 1500 of these were Indians,
Comaaehes, rApaches, Kiowas,
Gaddep and ' Wichita, and the
school 'campus was a city of near
ly 00 tehts,n,3 " ,
1 Between three and four hun
dfefl crop exhibits were entered
by the older members of the Va
rious tribes, One wholw tent was
Pride of Oklahoma, Who
TheGeneral Staffs of the Jleorganized
Magazine has the following to
beloved blind Senator, Thomas P(
of Woodrow Wilson as President:
m
ouc
The
Old Man Wisdom, and it Was his
filled with needle work and art
exhibits from the different Indian
schools, and in another tent, was
Indian bead-work and buckskin
garments valued as high as $3000.
One dress alone was on exhibi
tion for which $250 had been re
fused. There were five genuine
eagle-feather war-bonnets, any
one of which could be sold for
$150, and there were four headed
spears which could not be pur
chased for $200 apiece.
The Comanche Indian school
took the sweepstakes prize for
the best general exhibit. On de
partment exhibits, first, seconds
and ,thirds were pretty equally
divided between the six 'schools
entered the Comanche school at
Lawton, the Riverside school at
Ariadarko, the Anadarko board
ing school, the Rainy Mountain
school ntGotebo, the Cache Creek
Mission at Apache'ahd Apache
Mission on theTort Sill Reserva
tion, Prizes for crop exhibits in the
competition by older Indians were
won by members of all the affili
ated tribes. These consisted of
useful urtlcles for the heme or
farm, furnished by merchants of
J Lawton.
The State Geologieat Survey re
cenHfcmade public some point
in connection with Oklahoma'!)
salt deposits, withhich her peo
ple are not generally acquaintedi
Thiu survey has established thg
fact that there is enough aalb
water gohig to waste bn the plains
of Oklahoma to make sufficient
salt to load 100 .railway carBjev
ery day in the year. And, yet
the bulk of 'Oklahoma's salt is
derived from other states, awl ia
sold to our merchants at $1.79
per barrel. But two counties in
the state now produce salt for
commercial purposes Harmon
and Blaine. In 1010 these coun
ties produced 2564 barrels of salt
The largest salt plain in the state
is located in Alfalfa county. It
covers an area about four-by-four
miles square and the surface is
encrusted with glistening white
salt crystals. The plain is level
and white, absolutely barren of
vegetation, and is fed by salt
springs.
In the valley of the Cimarroni
Woodward county, are twoothtr"
very promising salt plains, which
are also fed by salt sprihrsWIt
is estimated that in this one coun
ty alone there are over 1,000, of
these salt springs.
r-O ' O -J
Champiento Elgin o
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The Champion, owned alra.ee
ited by J; s.,5ouie, js new
aya$j
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itfeat;tmn.-.
VA
pUblisbwirair
Lack of 8UBrtonttw'irt!er
the businessmen oflnsMloiaW'
is given as a reason zor'fpt pifc, ,"
Eer's removal. Indiahoma it , ,t
e condoled; in he lose of ile'e-.,
terprismg weekly Mr. Bottle 'm
an able writer and a splendid cit
izen, and Elgin is to be cbngratf
ulated upon being selected as the
f utare home of the paper and its
editor. News and Star,
o
What Our Victory Meant
Senator Owen says "The over
whelming Democratic victory fn
the United States means the over'
throw of corrupt businesa in al
liance with corrupt politicians !
it means the overthrow of control
by Republican leaders, for selfish
interests; it means' taking the
governing power out of the haade
of the special interests and put
ting it where it belongs; it means
the mandatory direct primary,
by the preferential primary for
president; the direct election of
United States Senators, the short
ballot, and the initiative, rofer
endum and recall."
o '
Indiahoma Lost Champied
Announcing lack of; support
front the business men of India'
homa as the reason for hia action
J. 3t, Soule, editor and proprietor
of the Indiahoma Champion, ii
moving his newspaper plant from
that place to Elgin, in the north'
eastern part of Comanche county,
.Mr." Soule was a candidate in
thejDemocratic primary for aom
nation for, the S&ate Legislature.
He has been editing one one of
the livest weeklynewspapers iri
the county, but- says he he net
been able to make a living in In;
diahoma. Tho ' business men of
Elgin, however, have! pledged a
support whieh will guaraatee he
Champion a good business at that
place. The first edition of the
Farmers Champion it is under
stood. will appear thj weeki
Constitution,
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