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Farmers' champion. (Elgin, Okla.) 1912-1922, September 18, 1913, Image 8

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ELGIN, OKI, A. FARMERS CHAMPION-
H
i.i &
51 t
STQHC
IV' I. 4.
CMS Tl TK tCfEITI MUM.
OKLAHOMA STATE FAIR
AND EXPOSITION
OKLAHOMA CITY, U .S. A.
RATIELLO
AND HIS
BAND
HARNESS
and RUNNING
RACES
:
vm.
I' J'
D
OPENS SEPTEMBER 23 CLOSES OCTOBER 4
U -M & H II . mtHI
L -"rTTT.Ir(."r.,"'"M'i:fl
AMRW1 T ia. tf'JA't JIT J i I irjwif
r i k r n iJiiB t i i"i ill 1 b "Bi
HIHEPSg5pEffftrdH
U-
rt
r
fc
1
i -
ALEXANDER THE CPEAT
"TNr 11 in s U ma
r
MAW'S COUEOr A''L CIRCUl
I tut f Von fc rc ! OM
THE THREE OUTTO
la Cfvantnc TrH - iftea Art.
lUUCtltC IIICMT CPOOHAW
1'nHftl Ur !'' TM Year
THE OMTAT PATTEPSOM IMOWI
Willi 7Vlr 'tairtitiM Airf-(va
auto polo eon roup uii oay
Vr'M' Moat rMorvn .
1 COMPLETE DEPARTMENTS
ImvtU.K HtHf HitiHngt
VI QOUHt IC COMPETING
Y'tT Cl arvj llnr .i. Oft T u4
"UfADOW Or THE CROSS"
lllrarle llttutc fr !. Ijm( Time
nccono creakihc cork sho
dull. Hri fl ant
rAMOus anh.no opera singers
INCLUDING OLIVE CLSOM 6CHAAF.
SOLDIERS
In Sensational
DRILLS
THE DROUGHT OF 1913 IS
ONE MORE ARGUMENT
COMMON SENSE
Tho I it n tl epcculnlnm who am po
Milfoils to prnro that "Oklahoma. In a
groat corn country" rugulnrly rf,'at
tliclr own puri'dM by phntlrii; largo
ncrcagia to corn on land totally tin-
sultul to I li? crop,
On July 1, K'I2, tli condition of tho
corn crop In Oklahoma wns 00; higher
than any ollwir statu.
On August I, 1'j12, tho condition of
(ha corn crop In Olilnlioma una 1,5;
lower thiin any other ritato.
On Austin I, 1911, tho condition of
tun corn crop in Oklahoma wns 33,
lower limn any othir stuto.
Tho nviTUK'i condition of corn In
Oklahoma on August 1, durliiK a period
of ten yarn, was 76, only onn atato,
Texas, Is lotvtr, with r.n incrano con
dition of 7.1.
'Ilium ii ro Dm figures Kent nut liy
tho llurtau of Htatlntics of tho V. H
Departtni'iit or Agrlciilturo IliiHlncs
race all oer Ihn country uhu thorn
lit a hauls for forming Ihi'lr opinion
of Oklahoma as nn ngrlciilturul j'ato.
Thy are ollltlal flguri'M mill thny inn
not l, offsi-t by wild ntiiti'inonlH In
"boosting dope" which may ho Hpreail
hroailcait,
t'lu-ro In n lot of good corn In OKIn
homi this year 'I horn nro prrhnps
3,000.000 arris whir Ii hnd it condition
of 10 on August 1st If that una nil
of fit wirn which hail heun planted
In Oklahoma this cnr, tho condition
of rorn In Oklahoma would In nil
probability luvo Iimii reporti'il iih tho
ssme ns the tuerngi) for tho ontlro
country, or perhaps Imtti-r,
Hill In nddlllon to the torn planted
FEEDS riFTY CALVE8
TO PAY FOR SILO
Hlnton rirmcr Makes Dig Profit! In
Operation of Nature' Treasure
Box
Hlnton, I-nst year I erect ed a
111 ton silo at n cost of $.181, and then!
bought fifty head of calves, that would
bo yearlings, long and nhoit In thu
spring l4it spring I Hold thirty four
head of tho je.irllngs for $27 CO cadi,
hog round, totaling $'l.in," said I) A
l'lunket of J llntoii dining tho visit of
tho Itock Inland silo special train
"Tl o milk cows I Hold oh In tho neigh
hoihood mid I figure that after ileditct
lug all costs or labor In lllllng the hIIo
utid tost of i nro for tho llvoslotk
through tho winter, 1 made imioiilIi
char prollt ovrr nud abovu what I
would hnru inniln hy dry feeding the
Kturf, tu Pay two thirds of tho cost
of tint silo
"J do not know If other peoplo can
m-vko muiiey with tho silo, but I do
know that I can uml am going In build
another As long as beef Is selling
mi high ns It Is, no farmer Iuih ii light
to complain of hard times and hnd
npn, when ho tan gather the watting
crops In the fall ami by running It
through tho silo Into the initio Imvo
a hank account In the spring I under
stand that (liarley Abbolt and K li.
IiOligfellow urn building silos.
Ono tenant mild that tr his landlord
would not funilih the leiuetit for the
oomtructlon of n pit silo, lin would
endeavor to obtain a tla-ynnr lratn
on th (arm and construct ono himself.
Fiilltnr In Hint, ho said, hu would did
th pit on tho farm and put la "tho
ullARu without the cement canting.
WiH Mm rt t-t Oit S - PJn i Trj f YeurttK fl Fi 1
THE CPEATEiT ASPICwuToRAL. LIVESTOCK. AND I'OUSTRIAL
iHO ( THE HU'MWEJT
A WIILI'S FAII AT TCII MM
EXPOSITION OUILOINS OKLAHO'A
FARM SCHOOLING AMI
Cina Pbwinj j4 Plirt rj b Trjet'jr Er- net
TOf fA"T AKl'ii f T M M Till HUT h Ml
A I'M I'KTj'' A KTI
lnr OlcUl -fr i-4" wn nl rrn ! r k r a utr t. U4 in .
'Wriilr f ! (wm I-1 aitva n tsrifjiluraJ rM Tt- l nir i
a Wif hanr l m ftr . i and bala nurh f ilj 4-lft .rif ,rrn us
Urar Lr romUiK t" KrMi'h Anr.nl i ,k alwraa ti Hair l( ar .! an
ltxrtunltr t" "mtin a'Un rjiur arwl VRiuab irbovlicr, a ' at a vtr,
f !
INSTRUCTIVE EXHIBITS 3CHODL OF AGRICULTURE
'i'iw the 'ttnf tt tn'r frir t' -k lr r 1 -r fari t"ru" lnt
lanu. fi .r. dairy anl C1ry trolu ard ereo'Mmt tU under i r r .Vr e
Ir a IVf t i jrn Uit
I S. M AHA M, SECRETARY OKLAHOMA CITY. OKLA
on corn land In Okliloma, shout i
2.VM),Oon aires w -ro plan'ed on land
urn) undir conditions not at all suited 1
to tho production of a profitable torn '
crop And the poor con lltlon of till
largo area offsot tho good ronditloni
of tho ri st mid put Into tho permanent
n cords of tho itnterntnent a report on
tho comllllon of corn In Oklahoma on !
AliRimt 1, 1912, which will Indicate to'
thosii who do not understand all of!
tho fnctH, that Oklahoma Isn't n corn
country at all
It Bunly ought soon to ho tlmo to
iitop this sort of foollshnesn Nut only
turn tho offort to prove that "Okln
liMinn Is n great torn country" failed
lo fool mi) ono, It his brought about
ollldal ri ports which lead the iinln
formed to bellow that torn Is unprofit
able on nil hindti In Okhhoma
(In Into your torn llilds now Land
whldi litis fullid to produce nt least.
twenty lh! hiishels of gooil torn to
the ntio HiIh )e.ir should not he plant
ed to corn ngnln It hnd hotter than
nn nverngo cluinco this year. I'nst
neasoiiH Imvo been poon r for the pro
tliKtlon of corn ofti'iier than they lue
broil better. Limit the com acreage
to rml torn lands so that Oklahoma
rany got full credit among tho rust of
tho Hliitvi for what 11 re illy cIoch In
tho way fo tho profitable production
of rorn.
Tho nborn Is from tho Sept. 1, 1912, 1
Oklahoma I 'arm Journal
Bringing the record down to date,
fi, 17i.000 nrn-K worn pltntul to lorn
I In Oklnhomn list spring, only 200,210
nrroH ie timn in rii2
SILAGE GOOD FEED
F V, I.nwn, a prosperous farmer
living mnr Cleo, and who wns limine;
the Motornl hundred farmers at the
Htntlon while (ho Itock Island silo
Hpecinl train was there, said ho fed
about Hlil) live head of mules, horses
ami (owh mound his silo last year and
helluvoiK tint growth on twelve head
of calveri paid for lllllng the silo, and
after selling tin m off still had silage
until July 1, this )ear
Ho Haiti twenty-one ncres of kaflr
wan used In Hilling tho silo last jeir
nnd thirty three nires wero used In
lllllng tho silo this ye'ir I.nws Haiti
ho tiHetl sumo broomcoru In lllllng the
silo last year but tho stock did not
Renin to relish It ns they did tho kallr.
Homo of tho horses nnd ) iVing mules
were Irtiiihltd with tho colic while
lining fetl silage, and Laws attributed
tho ailment to mold, occasioned by the
Hllngo not being packed tight. Laws
now lias 180 tons of silage stored nwa
for tho present )ear, which will he
fid to fifty head of horses and the
Hiinio number of cattle.
And Minister Had to Smile
In ilnler In noiitrnllro tho serious.
iichs of marriage n bridegroom loft a
nice, thickly wadded packet for tho
mlnlsler who olllclatcd, "This," said
the huppy bridegroom, "If yoilr fie,
Doctor," Tio minister thanked hlm
heartily mid Homo tlmo later on open-
i.. .. . . i.. . ., . .... . . .
tog me "it'O" lotinu it to ho n bundlo
of wrapping paper Bkllfully folded
and bearing this message: "Well, old
hoy, I'm married now, so don't wish
mo any hard lutk, even tt you art
Mt back a little. Yours In a raah."
Tr
STATE FAIR AMD EXPOSITION
"BE'
PLEASURE COMBINED
HOT
Aer it Farm Mjh'ner
I -T IT C TION
-
'. Ill J"S
On July 1 1911 the condition of the
corn crop In Oklahoma was S7 higher
than the average for the I nlted States
On August I, 191.1. the condition of
the corn crop In Oklahoma wan 44.
lower than any other state except
Kanis; .11 g lower than the average
for tho United States
Tho average condition of Oklahoma
corn on August 1 during tin- padt ten
yrarH dropped to 73, the lowest of all
the states
Tho corn crop will pay etpmsns
this year on about 1,000 000 ntreB in
Oklahoma Thorn will he a fair crop
on pirhaps another 1,000,000 acres,
nud "Homo lorn" on poRsibly another
1,000,000 acres. 'I ho rest of it Is a
complete failure and that land ought
never to ho plantd to torn ngnln
Certilnly, folks, tho following sua
gestlons In "Farm by a Safe Hvstrm"
which John Fields. II M. Cottrell mid
tho hankers have hen urging upon
you In every possible way, would. If
they had been adopted thin year, hive
merit d miith of the disaster whhh
has como upon iih
"A s)Htttii of farmnlg, has-d upon
oxpirlento and experiment In Okla
homa, whrro rainfall Ih nlwa)H vurl
utile and often deficient, and where
Htrong winds and high summer tern
pernturrfl produce condltlonn unknown
to fnrmerH of the Northern and At
lantic ConHt htnttH, has been devil
oprd and should bn adopted by nil
fnimers.
"'Ihn general plnn of operation
should bo the following
"Corn should ho planted only on
FOR YOUNG MULES
V. K Liiwh, ii brother of F W
I.nws, foil Hlllge to thirl) live head
of cattle and )oung mules hist )ear,
without nny supplemental feed. For
tho September calves, sold In Febru
ary, ho ricelvul $22 per head for
elevin of tho calves, anil quoted the
Ini) er as B.i)lng they shipped better
than any othi r slink In tho car.
"The only thing I know ngnlust a
sl!o Is that owning one makes n man
want another Just llko It.," bn said.
"This )ar I will fill my silo wllh
com nnd If I didn't Imvo n silo Into
whlrh to put the fodder I wouldn't
hnvo any fied for my stock during
tho coming winter, Ono man who
IinH Hi'vonly head of rtock mid no silo
hns been after me lu feed IiIb Rtock
for him thibugh tho winter, offering
mo $2 25 per month per head. I told
him I lould not accommodate hlm nnd
Miggistid Mint ho build himself a hIIo,
which he Halt! ho would do before an
other rrop My hIIo cost $ir. and I
wouldn't be without It under any tlr
uiiiuhIiiiicch "
Practical Joke Caused Death.
A ntallhy resident of Nowburgli, N,
V, died iih thu result of a pleasantry
perpetratitl by n frolicsome friend.
This friend, holding n 'lighted rlgar
nenr tho victim's face, suddenly nsketl
him to turn around, And ns this wai
donn tho cigar lightly touched the ylc
Uiii'h check. I loth gentlemeut enjoyed
nugoiy tho inorry Jest. In a few
months, however, a, cancerous growth
appearedon tho spot where the 8esh
had been burned and, growing rapidly,
Mtirtd the mtn'a death. M '
a.it-
tt s
FCtT ANSjAL HORSE S"OlV
rv- rr Bt Mr&u. t :
Wt !:w-v3 t aai
-'''t Tv-'tte PwJal
OAIRV CW PaStCTIO4 CONTEST
v 'jiarrSr X Fvr
GREAT CAVALRV CONTESTS
AM M Mi itarr rvairp rf - li
BOYS AND CIRLS' SCHOOLS
V a nf'mnt of :H "I'l'i
ii .. b sii : 'iio
brr"' k rM l'r 1
P-XI T
! Xnrit
KKUrwoilt MTttr'
SPLENOID DISPLAY OF FINE ARTS
iU'A '. ' Tinn. K.jel Work
miry Tvitii
KsMMt Jit Ht-'h.a
-r.
ER BABIES CON-ES- WITH
IN CASH PREMIUMS OFFERED
FAMOUS
Auto Speed
DEMONS
FOR
FARMING
bottom Ian I th seison of P12 w-a
better than th average for corn and
land which did not ied more thon
twntyllve bushels of corn to the acr
In 1912 Hhould hereafter be. planted
to kaflrcorn
Kvery acr of rich. welldralneJ
bottom land which doss not overflow
frequently or for long periods of time
should be put to alfalfa as noon as
possible
"The smooth, tillable uplands and
prairies ehould never be plantrd to
corn 1he should Instead bo planted
to kaflr corn or mllo maize for n sure
crop of grain for feed and sale, and
for Idling siloi and providing rough
feed, to towpeis and peanuts for feed
uml forage nod soil Improvement, and
to cotton wheat, oats and broomtorn
for cash trops, wherever soil and jell
mate are suitable
"Tho wash) hoIIb, hlllhldes, rough
places alkali lands, and overflow bot
toms should bo set to hardy hermudt
grai-H, wherever thM grass thrives.
"Those who follow a general Hystem
of farming such as this, ami feed most
of their crops to good livestock, will
he tbe ultimate owners of all the goo I
faniiH in Oklahoma"
During thu lact live jcira. 1009 1911,
tho total valuo of Oklahoma's corn
crop has been $121,000,001 luss th in
tho nctnal cost of the work done on It.
The bame work put In on sure fel
mips, cm kaflr, mllo peanuts, cow
pens, and c.ino, would have shown n
piollt very year
The phantom of a big corn crop has
rerlalnly ben pur-iu'-d long enough.
MISTAKES IN U3E
OF SILOS SHOWN
Mold Resulting from Improper Pack.
Ing of the Green Silage, One of
the Greatest Danger.
Aline A C. Murphy wns In the
lorge crowtl which met the Itock
Island silo speclil triln nt Aline, and
anlil
"Last year I fed off t-vo cirs of
heifer anil stoers, using silage and
tome ground chops The heifers about
pah for thu silo, but I didn't make
much off the Htcers oh I bought them
too high Tho horses I fed with sllago
didn't seem to llko It very much, but
lifter listening lo the lectures hero I
conclude It was because of the mold
that resulted fro'n Imperfect packing.
"I wouldn't be without a silo on a
farm nud havn Just bought for M0
el,:dty acros of corn BUndlng In tho
Held which I will put Into my silo this
)oar. Tho man from whom I bought
the corn hasn't a silo nnd thought It
would be wind whipped away If left
In the shock. I will have plenty of
feed for in) stock tills winter, although
Hoii'ii of my neighbors will have to
havn tlielm Bhlpped In. I had out 100
acres of wheat this year but It made
only 010 bushels"
Oilier silo owners around Aline am
Fred l.'rwln, H I J. llurson, James Hns
sen and Frank Drown.
Will Find Seme Variations
The girt who gets her Idaas of lov
anil the youug man who gets hla Idea
f business out of the atory papers
ra both luble to Meet with dls.
telattjioau. t
1' T "
ant e
Margaret and Her Rag
'WtflBaMM
CHli GO Sallr bt blue dress
ard (be cbildnh lup of Sail) s
oncer vaj tbe cause of It all
Saltr is a rag doll wltb one e;e
"Sally's" mistress Is Margaret, tbe nlne-Tar-oW
daurhter of Mrs H M. Smith.
4533 Clarendon avenue
Sally's dress or ratber little Miss
Margart s concern over It. threw that
section of the north shore Into a
f.urrr of excitement tbe other day
and care the police tomet! In; to do
on a dull day
The trouble started when Margaret
and the neiihbor children became In
Vtlvod in a dispute over tbe property
lights of certain dolls clothes 'Sal
I) blue dress in particular
Margaret finding herself outnum
bered, ran to the telephone In the
Smith dining-room.
Police apartment," she called
Glre me the police apartmenL"
New Nurses Bandaging
CLEVELAND, 0 Just before d!n '
r.er time tho other night, new
nurses at Glenvllte hospital In Park
wood drive were called Into the base
ment for bandaging and bed making
t'-actiee under the direction of Miss
Jennie llogland
In showing the )oung women how
and where to put the bandages, Miss
llogland used a dummy Just as one
particularly pretty nurse was putting
on a 'flr;tald' bandage In response
to Information from the Instructor
that tho dummy's rig! t ankle had
been broken, a small boy happened
along
Ills cap did not fit, which may have
been duo to the abnormal develop
ment of his bump of curiosity He
saw n light In tho basement window
and "peeked" In
"(ice, a feller's been killed and the
girls are patching him up again," ho
exclaimed.
"Com'mcre quick, Jlmmle," the
boy called to another
"He must have been burned, or
something," reasoned the second
couiious youth "They've got him
covered with bandages."
Cop Captures Bat and
DETROIT. MICH. Before this story
Is told let It bo understood thut
Patrolman Gustavo Fcldman of the
police court detail, is a man of un
, questioned veracity. He has occasion-
ally returned from n llshlng expedi
tion with stories of tho size of the
ones that gut nwa), but tho sight ho
witnessed the other night, nnd do
scribed tho following morning, oc
curred on dry land.
Fcldman has n memento of the
adventuro In tho shnpo of a bat not
tho kind that Ty Cobb swings but
tho kind described In tho dictionary as
"a Hying, Insectivorous mammnl,"
and It measures 2G Inches acioss tho
wings.
Bread and Ham on Waters Bring Back a Shave
PITTSIIUHOII, PA. Tho truth of
tho Biblical Injunction about cast
ing bread upon the waters unU 'the
bountiful roturns that will accruo was
qulto satisfactorily proven to City Do
tcctlvo William O'llryau tho other day,
nnd thin sleuth now thinks tho pro
verb should be amended so or to In
cludo hnm In addition to tbo bread.
O'lloau Is n follower of Dr. Wiley's
teachings nnd refuses to touch tbe
"contnmlnnted" food. Therefore he
carrlos n .modest littla lunch. Tho
other evening O'Bryan was not feeling
very well. However, ho mndo away
with all bit. lunch with thq uxceptlon
ol two little ham sandwiches. Some
tlmo later, while walking through tbo
cell room at Control station, he pass
oil u cell In which wero two young
prisoners who appeared, to O'Bryun's
eagle eye, to bo hungry. He Inquired
whether the young fellows were suf
fering from pangs around the belt Ite
eelvlng a decidedly affirmative an
swer, tho detective handed In the two
.sandwiches, which wera soon de
VMrad. A faw days iatar iCBryaa waa to-
I
Doll Bestirs the Police
is this an emergency call?" arked
'he surprised operator.
-Ves." cried MargareL "Pollen
apartment quick."
Margaret connected with tho
Town ball station and she excitedly
demanded that a policeman be sent
to tte house because some ono had
istolen her doll's clothes. The desk
erge&nl understood Margaret to say
diamond brooch."
A few minutes later a uniformed po
liceman and two plain clothes men
hurried Into the Beach View apart
ment house and began ringing the
Smiths bll There as no answer,
because Margaret had seen them com
ing and decided she did not ant tho
i-ollce after all
So Margaret Lid under the bed while
the pollc-men rang Finally uje of
them went for tho Janitor, whllo tho
others took strategic portions hi iront
and behind tho house to prevent tho
escap of the malefactors
A little persuasive work by the Jani
tor Induced Margaret to open tho door.
She told her troubles then and showed
ono of the policemen tbe scene of the
late "scrap" on the bick porch Thero
was a wild scurry of little girls away
from the porch as the policeman ap
peared, and 'Sally's" clotbes were left
lying on the step.
Dummy Draw Big Crowd
A grov,nup "bo)" came along and
seeing the others looking in, did like
wise Several more boys, a few girls
and women and more men joined tho
group, which was rapidly becoming a
crowd
Various comments were heard as to
tho nature of tho Injury to tho un
fortunnto stranger All agreed ha
must bo badly, perhaps fatally, hurt
One or two women turned pale Just
then Miss llogland glanced up and
saw tho faces at tho window. She
concluded there had been an accident
"Here's a chance for some real ex
perience," she Bald to her pupils and
ran out.
Tho crowd looked at her blankly.
Then Mio looked In the window and
the mystery became transparent
Has Hair-Raising Story
It wns Foldman's night to watch
tho records at pollco court and ho
dozed In a chair In tho clerk's oulco.
A fluttering of wings awakened him
and In tho dim half light of the mu
nicipal building ho could dlscorn tho
figures of two largo bats
The bird animals circled around
and darted at one nnother several
times, apparently engaged In mortal
combat. Feldman watched the fight
for a short time, fascinated by tho
ferocity of the bats, and then moved
slightly In his chair to get n better
glimpse of the engagement A nows
pnper l)lng on his knees rustled and
tho light between the bats suddenly
renscd. They wheeled around the
policeman's head a few- times and
then darted directly at him.
Tho bats kept up tho attack.
Switching on the light, Feldman ran
to his locker, got his night stick and
returned to tho fray. Ono of tho
bats escaped, but tho other flew
around In circles, daied und blinded
by tho flood of light It fell an easy
victim to Foldman's club
posing In a barber's chair, giving the
tonsorlal artist some straight tips on
the complex political situation and in
cidentally getting a shavo. When the
pcrforraanco was complotcd and the
detect Ivo approached tho cashier's
desk to pay up, be was Informed that
his shavo was paid for.
"Why," gasped tbe astonished thief
trailer as visions of grafters flew be
foro his oyes, "who suffered from soft
hcartedness?" "Oh," replied the cashier, nonchal
antly, "a young feller, what said yer
gl'ed Mm a sand witch when he waa
locked In de cooler t'oder night, said ha
wasted to pay yar back (or ( grubstake."
A
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