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Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, December 12, 1908, NEWS SECTION, Image 1

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The Omaha Daily Bee
HEWS SECTION.
Pages 1 to 10.
Only 10 DAYS For
Christmas Shopping
v
VOL. XXX VII I NO. 152.
OMAHA, 'SATURDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 12, 1908 TWENTY PAGES.
SINGLE COPY TWO CENTS.
SUMMARY OF THE CEE
MACK SAYS BRYAN IS OUT
Thinks Tariff Will Be Issue from
Now On.
NO ROW AMONG DEMOCRATS
GOVERNORS AT EXPO
State Executives Will Speak at Corn
Show Today.
FRATERNAL DRILLS BIG FEATURE
S -C 111 Cv X
1 ... f -BVf
Saturday, Decern her lii, IftA.
1908 '-December- 1908
.sn: my irz. imt fft-
-r- 2 3 4o5
Qr Z 8 9 10 11 12
13 11 15 16 1Z 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 20
2Z 28 2930 31
BUSY DAY FOR TAFI
President-elect Confers with Roose
velt About Cabinet Making.
CONFERENCE WITH ALDRICH
Work of Monetary Commission Dis
cussed with Rhode Islander.
ASKS CABINET JOB FOR KNIGHT
Congressman McKinley Urges Ap
pointment of California Orator.
NEBRASKANS AMONG CALLERS
Senator Brown inl Congressman
Illnshaw Commit rresldent-eleet
Other Western Men Are
In Evidence.
WASHINGTON, Dee. 11. President Roose
' velt and William H. Taft had an extended
conference tonight at the White Huuio.
Among the matters discussed was the
' makeup of the Taft cabinet. The eonfer
' em-e began after 10 o'clock after a dinner
at the home of Assistant Secretary of the
' Treasury and Mrs. Wlnthrop, attended by
' Mr. and Mrs. Taft. Before the conference
Mr. Taft announced that he should decline
'to live any details whatever, aside from
; the advance announcement that he would
talk ' over many Important matters with
' the president. Mr. Taft tomorrow likely
will have a conference with Secretary Root
( regarding; his cabinet.
Monetary Commission's Work.
. During an Interview today between Mr.
Taft and Senator Aldrlch the result of the
monetary commission's work was thor
' oughly gone over. Senator Aldrlch Is a
thorough believer In the efficiency of the
'commission and Is an enthusiastic advocate
of legislation which shall place Into per
manent law some of the recommendations.
Mr. Taft heretofore has gone over these
matters somewhat In detail with Repre
sentative Burton of Ohio, a member of the
commission, and It Is a safe prediction that
the next administration will be favorable
to the enactment of at least some of the
recommendations looking to permanent re
.form In the currency system of the coun
try. Mr. Taft said his Interview With Sena
tor Aldrlch did not relate to the postal
ravings bank bill. Representative Burton
will have a conference with Mr. Taft to
morrow, at which time, It Is believed, the
subject will be pursued further.
George A. Knight of California was
recommended for a cabinet position -today
by Representative Duncan B. McKinley of
that slate. Ohio politics was discussed
with Wade Kills, assistant United States
attorney general. Cardinal Gibbons and
Father Welch conferred as special repre
sentatives of Cathollo Indians in' mat
ters pending before the Indian bureau.
Western Mm In' Evidence.
Rfpresnntath'es 'of Ute Farmers' Na
tional Congress called on Mr. Taft to re
ceive assurances of his Interest In the or
ganization. Senator Fulton of Oregon
brought forward the claims of the north
i west for preferment In the diplomatic ser
! vice. Senators KIttredge and Gamble of
South Dakota talked, over the political
ultuatlon In their state with Mr. Taft, but
at separate times. Governor-elect Stubbs
' of Kansas and Governor Hoggatt of Ala
bama had a conference with Mr. Taft, as
did Representatives Hlnshaw of Nebraska,
Muguire of Oklahoma. Senators Brown of
Nebraska Clapp and Nelson of Minnesota
Mr. and Mrs. Taft had luncheon with
Mr. and Mrs. T. T. Gaff, formerly of Cin
cinnati. In the afternoon they were re
o Ivcd at the Concessional club and dined
with Mr. and Mrs. Beekman Wlnthrop.
After the Gridiron dinner, which he will at
ti r.d tomorrow night, Mr. Taft will go to
i'W Yolk. On Thursday he will start for
.UtiU3tU, Go.
TARIFF
HEARINGS EXTENDED
Pre: Irirnt-elert Taft to Hnv Further
Conferences with, Com suit tee.
WASHINGTON. Dee. ll.-The tariff hear
ings b-j.'oie the w:iya and means committee
wili continue t... ...ighout the short session
of congress, and President-elect Taft will
have further conferences with tire commit
tee. A compromise has been reached. It
Is learned further, regarding the tariff on
Philippine sugar and toboeco as a result
of the conference yesterday between Mr.
Taft and the majority membi rs of the e:m
nilttee. That the house of repres.-ntativs
will puss a bill which will thoroughly re
vise the present schedules Is generally ad
mitted.
At yesterday's conference Mr: Taft did
nut discuas any particular tariff schedules,
tut expressed the desire to take up certain
ached jles at some further conference. He
also favored any action on the part of the
Committee which would bring befora It
those manufacturers who have expressed
their views publicly on the tariff qu-stion,
as well aa any questions, who could furnish
valuable Information In connection with the
proposed revision.
Chairman Payne said tonight that An
drew Carnegie Is the only witness who has
been subpoenaed up to this time and It will
therefore be necessary for the committee
to hold further hearings after the Christ
ina lecess.
With ITcsldent-elect Taft and the house
In fuvor of a tariff law which will meet
present conditions and materially revise
present duties, mainly downward, the- dis
cussion of the situation centers In the pos
sible action of the senate. While some
assert the upivr house will not attempt to
laakd any radical changes In the house
Mil, provided that measure does not In
clude many reductions, others say certain
senators will desire to amend the bill to
such an extent that Mr. Taft would be
likely to veto It. This may have the effect
of getting through the senate the bill which
the house accepts. It Is considered likely
tUat the extra session of nongress will lost
lute Into the summer.
Herbert I- Miles of the National Asso
ciation if Manufacturers, who has ap
peared biforu the committee several times,
resumed lii" stand today. He said that
the taiif p.unk of the republican plat
form as variously Interpreted by republi
cans. Mr. Taft, he said, does not define it as
meaning that enough for a reasonable
profit should be added to the duty. In addl
ilon to making the tariff sufficiently high to
iquallxe the cost of 1 production In this
otintry and abroad. Mr. Miles offered In
ividelica several Invoices which he
ilaluaed proved that American manufac
turer ofer their goods to foreign buyers
tOontlnue4 on Pag a Two.)
THt WIATHIB.
FOR OMAHA, COITNCIL BI.VFF3 AND
VICINITY Fair and warmer Saturday.
FOR NEBRASKA Fair and warmer
Saturday.
FOR IOWA Fair and warmer Saturday.
Temperature at Omaha yesterday:
Hour. J-eg.
5 a. m
6 a. m
7 a. m
8 a. m
9 u. m
10 a. m
11 a. m
12 m
1 p. m
2 p. m
3 p.
in
m
4 P.
o p.
p.
7 P.
8 p.
9 p.
m. .
m. .
DOMESTIC.
War department has decided that Major
Brad Slaughter need not appear bei re
retiring board, as he is amply able to
continue his duties. Faga 1
The annual report of the secretary of
the navy shows the good results of the
trip of the Atlantic fleet around the
world. Tag 1
FOKXXGHf.
President Castro Is allowed to land on
promise that he will not Indulge In In
flammatory utterances In France. The
Dutch are preparing to make things In
teresting for his government In Vene
zuela. Fags a
Nearly the entire business section of
Patton, la., wiped out by fire. Fag 1
Senator Norrls Brown called uron
President-elect Taft yesterday at Wash
ington. Fr 1
The Country Life commission was In St.
Paul yesterday. Fags 1
Democratic Chairman Mack says the
tariff and not Bryan will be the Issue In
four years. Fags 1
Porter M. Jones, an old-time linotype
operator of Omaha, died In Ogden.
Fags 1
J. Plerpont Morgan made a quick trip
from Chicago to New York on a special
train. B"
Retrials have been denied In the capltol
fraud cases In Pennsylvania In the cases
of four of the convicted men. Fags 3
Secretary Hayward of the republican
national committee and Assistant Tieas
urer Upham have planned to keep head
quarters open permanently in Chicago.
Faff 1
X.OCAX.
Prof. Avery may be permanent chan
cellor of the University of Nebraska.
. Fag B
Husband of Abble Rice has a hbme pre
pared for them In Boston and she -expects
to go to him. Fg
' Governors of four states to be present
and deliver addresses today at the corn
show. People are Just beginning to realise
the magnitude of the exposition. Fag 1
COMXXKCXAI. AJffD ZHDUBTBIAIm
Live stock markets. , Fag IT
Grain markets. ' Fag 17
Stocks and bonds. Fag 17
MOTIHinTS OF OCEAW STEAMSHIPS.
Port. ' Arrlvd. Billed.
NSW YORK L Touraln.
Bot'UXINE NeuV Amsterdam.
LONHON Minneapolis.
DUKKNSTOWN TutontC
LIVERPOOL lml.'
HAVKB Lt Lorntnt
SOUTHAMPTON. Adriatic
STANDARD IS READY TO QUIT
OH Company Will Probably Stop
Introduction of Evidence In
Defense In DlsT Case.
NEW YORK, Dec. 11. It developed today
that the Standard Oil company may not
submit any further evidence In Its defense
to the government's suit to have the so
called trust dissolved. Today's session of
the court adjourned rather abruptly on re
quest of counsel for the Standard, who
asked that they be allowed until Monday
to check up evidence already In and de
cide whether lt ' would be necessary for
them to summon more witnesses. The re
quest was granted. Hugo C. Wassman, who
has charge of the lubricating business of
the lubricating business of the Standard
Oil company of California, waa the princi
pal witness examined today.
Mr. Wassman testified that he left the
employ of the Slandard OH company of
California In 1903 and afterward employed
by the Sotuhern Refining company and
Peulnta Oil company. The Standard, ho
he said, never allowed him to cut prices,
but the Southern and Peunta companies
did allow him to do so.
Adjournment was then taken until Mon
day. It is understood that after a brief
session on Monday further adjournment
will be taken until after January 1.
EX-NEBRASKAN RUNS AMUCK
Artbnr E. I'omeroy Creates Helen of
Terror at Edsjewnter, N. J.,
While lu Frcnsy.
EDGEWATER. N. J . Dec. 11 Shouting
that he was "John the Baptist, come to
save the world," an aged Insane man held
this town In terror for nearly an hour this
afternoon. He rushed down the main
street, waving a revolver and shouting,
held up half a dozen cltlxens. robbed the
tills of three business establishments and
exchanged many shots with a hastily
formed posse. His wild career was checked
when he was bowled over by shots by
members of the posse after a chase of
more than half a tulle.
After his capture the man said his nam
Is Arthur S. Pomeroy, and that he came
from Nebraska. It Is believed that he es
caped recently from a sanitarium at San
ford, Conn. Pomeroy was shot twice, but
his wounds are not regarded as serious.
He will be removed to the stats Insane
asylum at Morris Plains.
COMMISSION VISITS ST. PAUL
On Day's Session Will B Held There
Next Slttln at Madi
son, Wis.
BT. PAUL. Minn.. Dec. ll.-PresMent
Roosevelt's commission on country life ar
rived today from Omaha and Is holding
thrto meetings at th Slate Farm school
in St. Anthony park. Prominent farmers,
teachers, clergymen and business and pro
fessional men are presenting their views tin
rural conditions. The commission will go
to Madison, Wis., tonight
4
FartTt National Chalrmau Says. Will
Attend to Minority's Position
on This Question In
Con t ress.
BUFFALO. -N. Y.t Dec. ll.-Norman E.
Mack, chairman of the democratic national
commute, when asked about th published
report that a disagreement had developed
between himself and Secretary Woodson
of the committee, snld:
"There Is nothing to it. Nothing at all."
"Will the democratic national committee
meet soon?"
"Unless something now unforeseen arises
the. committee Is not likely to meet for
three years. It is not customary for the
committee to meet between campaigns.
Nothing will be done about the establish
ment of permanent headquarters until after
the holidays."
"Are you still friendly to Mr. Bryan?"
"Certainly: I see no reason why I should
not be Just as good a friend of Mr. Bryan
now as I have been In the past."
"Will you be for him for president In
1912?"
"As it Is not at all likely that Mr. Bryan
will be a candidate four years from now,
there Is no use discussing that question
at this time."
"Who is likely to be a candidate?"
"Your guess Is Just as good as mine. Tho
important question Just now Is whether we
are going to have any real tariff revision.
The manner in which the high protective
Interests at Washington are framing things
makes It appear that the relief expected
will not be realized; but the Interests of
the democratic party will be well taken
care ot by the democrats in congress."
SLAUGHTER STAYS IN SERVICE
War Department Decides He is
Amply Able to Perform Ills
Duties.
(From a- Staff Correspondent.)
WASHINGTON, Dec. ll.-(Special Tele
gram.) Senators Burkett and Brown were
today advised that the War department
has laid aside indefinitely the proposed
retirement of Major Slaughter, paymaster
now stationed at Omaha. Some little time
ago. Major Slaughter, In company with
other army officers, was ordered to Den
ver to take a ninety-mile endurance horse
back ride. After the ride 1n the high al
titudes In the vicinity of Denver the ma
jor's heart was found to be In a flutter
by th medical men and they probably de
cided that If he was called upon to make
a long ride acres the country to pay off
troops he would not be equal to tho task.
They therefore recommended Major
Slaughter be relegated to the' rear. To
day's development, however. Indicates that
Major , Slaughter Is perfectly capable to
perform all the duties of hla position and
may enjoy disbursing Unci Barn's money
as paymaster for years, to come. ,
Prof. Condra of the University of Ne
braska spoke for tho Ajitelope state at
tho closing session of the National Rivers
and Harbors congress today. He reviewed
what had been accomplished in the way
of survey work In the Upper Missouri and
gave a most Interesting sketch of tho for
mation of the banks along the "Big
Muddy." Prof. Condra's speech for Ne
braska was greeted with applause.
Henry T. Clarko was elected vlco presi
dent of the National Rivers and Harbors
congress for Nebraska, a position he has
filled for a number of years. He left to
night for Omaha.
E. T. Hancock of Dubuque, was elected
vce president for Iowa.
Mrs. Russell Harrison, formerly of
Omaha, arrived her yesterday. She Is
visiting Miss Daisy Gordon Stewart, who
Is a slater of Alonzo Stewart, assistant
sergeant-at-arms of the senate and will
remain here during the winter.
Representative Pollard is advised by the
Department or Agriculture that Oeorge I
Cooley of the good roads section of the
department will visit Falls City, Neb.,
January 6, to consult with Dr. Minor with
reference to the construction of certain
roads In Richardson county.
Senators Burkett and Brown today Joined
In endorsing Rev. Rufus W. Keyser of
Palmyra, Neb., for & chaplaincy In the
army. Rev. Mr. Keyser Is a Baptist clergy
man of high standing, and aside from the
endorsement of the Nebraska senators, has
numerous other . eulocrlstlc letters, all of
which have been filed at the War depart
ment. George Call of Sioux City, la., who has
been attending th convention of the Na
tional Rivera and Harbors congress, left to
night for New York, where after a few
days spent upon business h will return to
his home.
Senator Cummins and wife will leave for
Des Moines Immediately upon the adjourn
ment of congress for th holidays?"
Rural routes have been ordered estab
lished as follows: January I, Nebraska
Morrill, Scott's) Bluff county, route 2, popu
lation 500, families 125. February 1, Pouth
Dakota Chelsea, Faulk county, rout 1,
population 800, families 75.
Rural carriers appointed: Nebraska
Carleton, rout 2, Frank D. Emerlck, car
rier; Clark D. Baker, substitute. Lawrence,
route 1, Thomas A. FrlemJ, carrier; Charles
C. McNew, substitute. South Dakota-
Corsica, route 1, Harry R. Doty, carrier;
Clare F. Kinder, substitute.
Viola M. Girt has been appointed post
master at Nax, Dundy county, Nebraska,
vice V. M. Wesley, married.
FREE TRADE WITH FILIPINOS
President-elect Taft Discusses Sub
ject with Ways and Means
Committee.
WASHINGTON. Dee, ll.-Fre trad with
the Philippines waa one of the most im
portant matters agreed upon by President
elect Taft and th republican members of
the ways and means commute at yester
day's conference on tariff revision. While
Mr. Taft favors free trad with the Insular
possessions without any restrictions, it is
understood that In order thar shall be no
dissension, h has agreed that th amount
of sugar and tobacco which should be al
lowed entry free of duty should bo re
stricted. With th end In view, It is understood that
th sugar Interests have agreed to a com
promise by which 300,000 tons of sugar will
b admitted from th Philippines annually
fr of duty and that all sugar over that
amount will pay th present rat of duty,
which Is 26 per cent less than the duty im
posed by th Dlngley tariff on sugar from
other countries'
, i
1
From the New York World.
FLEET'S TRIP BIG BENEFIT
Secretary Metcalf's Report for Nary
Department.
STRENGTHENS POSITION IN EAST
Appropriations for Four New Battle
ships and Four Scout Cruiser
Are Recommended, Besides
Minor Vessels.
WASHINGTON, Dec. ll.-Secrctary Met
calf of the Navy department. In his an
nual report, discusses, . as the ; most
notable naval event of the past year,
the voyage of th battleship fleet, whldi
"has proven an epoch-making cruise."
Late In the spring of 1907 Is was decided
to send th Atlanta fleet on -a practice
cruise to the Pacific. When th purpose
of giving this assemblage ot sixteen battle
ships such a practice cruise, under severe
conditions, was announced, he states,
criticism from high technical quarters was
heard. The undertaking. It Is said, was
too monumental; dangers mora that multi
plied with numbers In such a case; battle
ships should not be sent around the globe
on any ordinary occasion; the skeletons
of some of them would doubtless be left
in the Btralts of Magellan; and, If th
ships should round South America, they
would, one by one, arrive with machines
loose and unserviceable, and with crews
reflecting the condition of the material.
The facts are, Secretary Metcalf says,
that the ships maintained schedule -time,
and have practically taken care of their
own repairs on this cruise. The repairs'
list sent in at the naval station, Cavl'e,
P. I., have Just been received, and are
significant. They show that after the
voyage to the distant borders of th
Pacific, he needed repairs are negligible.
The performance of the Oregon In 1S9S has,
It seems, been substantially repeated.
Strengthening; Alliance.
This cruise, as yet hardly half over, he
declares has given us an opportunity to get
better acquainted with the republics to
the south of us, with our own Island posses
sions, with the new and vigorous branch
of the British Empire in Australia, and
particularly with Japan; and has given to
those countries a better opportunity to get
acquainted with us. It has been every
where understood and accepted, as it waa
Intended, as the reaching out of a strong
hand In friendly greeting on tho part of
America, and the cordial hospitalities ex
tended to our fleet will be long remem
bered, and have powerfully Influenced
feeling tn this country. Between the United
States and every country visited there Is
a feeling of deeper Interest and friendship
than existed before tho fleet sailed.
Passing to certain recent crttlsms of the
new and larger battleships now building, the
secretary says that at the conference, con
vened and opened by the president at
Newport, the general matter of design of
these ships was approved, after forty-three
days' consideration, by this assemblage of
the best authorities available In the navy,
consisting of about sixty officers, all but
seven of whom were lino officers of the
seagoing branch of the service.
Marksmunshlp ho says has Improved on
tho practise cruise. With respect to the
assertion that our twelve-Inch guns are
Inferior to those of other powers, the
facta are found to be that the actual
muzzle energy of these twelve-Inch guns,
which form the main armament of our
eight latest battleships In commission, is
somewhat greater than that of any gun
afloat In any other navy.
As the officers In command of the Ameri
can fleet now In the far east holds the
rank of rear admit al only, he Is In a posi
tion of subordination to foreign naval of
ficers. This Is true because foreign powers
have, on Important naval station, repre
sentatives of the rank of vice admiral.
The secretary urges' that the navy should,
without delay, be provided with two vie
admirals.
Secretary's Recommendations.
I. Is desirable, the secretary states, to
lengthen the dry dock authorized by con
gress to be constructed at Pearl harbor,
Hawaii, from 850 to 1,140 feet, to render lt
capable of accommodating two or mor
vessels at once.
Secretary Metcalf recommends that th
navy yards at New York. Philadelphia,
Norfolk, Puget Sound and Mar Island be
developed to their fulj capacity for the re
pair and maintenance of ships, but says
it la not further desirable to develop oiner
navy yards, at least until that at Guanta-
LUKEWARM.
PROGRAM.
Governors liny, Saturday.
IN CONCERT HALL 10:30 A- M.
Lorenzo Crounse, chairman.
Address by George U Sheldon, gov
ernor of Nebraska.
Music America Wlegand
Address by E. W. Hoch, governor ot
Kansas.
Address by Warren Garst, governor
of Iowa; subject, "Neoesslty for Im
proved Farm Conditions from a Na
tional Standpoint."
Music Meditation (characteristic) ....
. Morrison
Address by B. B. Brooks, governor of
Wyoming.
Music March of the Twelfth Regl-
ment Lincoln
' Fraternal Day, Afternoon.
1:30 Music: George Green and hla band.
2:00 Drills by lady drill teams:
Omaha Lodge No. 1. Royal Achates.
Omaha; Captain Charles M. Rack
ley In command.
Banner Lodge, Fraternal Union of
America, No. 11, Omaha; Captain
"i trs. N. E. THlson in command.
(Character dance by Miss Marlon
Freeman).
Washington Lodge No. 47. Degree of
Honor, Omaha; Captain -Mrs. Mary
Walter In command.
Omaha Lodge No. 811. Fraternal
Union of America, Omaha: Captain
Mrs. M. E. Blair in command.
Ak-Sar-Ben Lodge No. 173, Degree of
Honor, Omaha: Captain Mrs. Jose
phine Wlttlg In command.
(Character dance by Miss Marlon
Freeman).
EVENING.
7:30 Music: George Green and his band.
8:00 Drills by men drill teams:
Camp No. 22G, M. W. A., Lincoln,
Neb.; Captain C. Percy Walter in
command.
Lodge No. 17, A. O. TT. W., Omaha,
Neb.; Captain F. 8. Simpson In
command.
Music By Beech Camp No. 14E4, M.
W. A., Omaha, quartet; O. John
son, B. E. Johnston, A. J. Alvord
and F. E. Burkemod.
Camp No. 120, M. W. A., Omaha;
Captain H. 'C. Martens in com
mand. Lodge No. 159, A. O. U. W.. Omaha;
Captain Henry Jiemphen in com
mand. Beech Camp No. 1454, M. W. A. quar
tet. .
Camp No. 94R. M. W A., Omaha:
Certain E. B. Ferris In command.
Exhibition drill by the first prlz
winners, Indies' team.
Awarding of the prizes to the wn
tilng teams by MY G. W. Wattles
president of the exposition.
Cash prizes and a gld medal wit'
each prize will he awarded as follows
Men's teams: First prize, $100; seconc"
5P; third. $25 .
Ladies' teams: First prize, SCO; sec
ond, $C3. . . .
Judges. of the drtllers: Major D. F
McCarthy. Captain Hrrrv E. Dalton nc
lieutenant William N. Haskell.
MORGAN MAKES QUICK TRIP
Kcw York Financier Travels on Spe
cial Train front Chicago
to JVew York.
NEW YORK, Dec. 11. After having pre
dicted in Chicago that "any man who is
a bear on the future of this country will
go broke," J. P. Morgan returned to New
York last night from a remarkable . trip
on a special train over the Lake Erie and
New York Central rallreads. The Journey
was made In seventeen hours and on
minute, which Is one hour faster than the
Twentieth Century Limited
Mr. .Morgan was In a hurry to return to
New York, lt Is said, because of a business
engagment and for that "reason procured
the special train. The special made from
fifty-eight to sixty miles an hour for the
entire distance, with only six stops between
Chicago and this city. It Is estimated that
the trip cost the financier $100 an hour.
W. C. Brown, senior vlco president of the
New York Central railroad, was the only
other passenger on th Morgan train. Two
private cars were used and two heavy
baggage cars were attached to balance the
train as lt whizzed eastward. Locomotives
were changed six times at South Bend,
Toledo, Cleveland, Buffalo, Syracuse and
Albany.
The record run from Chicago to New
Y'ork Is sixteen hours, flat.
HEADQUARTERS TO STAY OPEN
Secretary Hayward and Treasurer
Upham Plan to Maintain Repub
lican Organisation,
CHICAGO, Dec. 11. At a conference to
day between William Hayward, secretary
of th republican national commute and
Fred W. Upham, assistant treasurer, H
was decided to open permanent headquar
ters of th committee In Chicago. It is
planned 'to keep th records and other
matters up to date to th end that all may
b In readiness when the campaign opens
four years hence. Later, It is said, branch
headquarters will be opened In Washington.
BRIAN'S IDEA OF TAXATION
Would Change Completely the System
Now in Vogue.
CORPORATIONS FINANCE STATE
Greasi Has n Scheme to Get the lng
Term on the State Educational
. Board Ilullnir on Per
sonal Taxes.
(From a Staff Correspondent.)
LINCOLN. Dec. 11. (Special.) The tax
ing system of the state Is to be completely
revolutionized if State Treasurer Brian's
recommendation to the governor Is carried
out. Mr. Brian suggests In his biennial
report that the public service corporations
should be taxed sufficiently to pay the ex
penses of the state government and that
property In the counties should be taxed
to support the county governments only.
Mr. Brian's membership on the State Board
of Assessment, which, he says, "is one of
the most undesirable and responsible bj are's
of which I am a member," has caused him
to devote considerable study to the question
of taxation. Here is the plan he proposes:
I feel, that the people of the state do not
understand the conditions that arise in
i making a fair and Just assessment of rall-
I roads and a fair and Just equalisation of
other property In this state. I also realize
, that It is Impossible for this board to know
accurately the values of different property
; In different part of the state and that by
i seeing the values upon paper and cumpar
' lng them with other counties Is the only
way we have of knowing whether one
county Is bearing Its Just pioportlon of state
taxes with the other counties. In order to
overcome this difficulty which arises be
fore ihls board annually, and more par
ticularly every four years when the read
justment of real estate values Is made, I
would suggest that each county assess
values of their property as they deem best
to meet the conditions In their part of the
state which do not arise in other parts, and
In order to accomplish this purpose I be
lieve that' If the public service corporations
in the state were required to pay the ex
penses as created by the state and each
county pay the expenses as created by tnat
county upon the assessed value of ail prop
erty within the county except these cor
porations the difficulty In equalization be
tween the various counties in tho state
would be overcome.
Home Other Recommendations.
In his report Mr. Brian says the state
debt will be wiped out by July 21. 1909 and
; consequently there will be no need of the 1
'mlll levy next year, as provided for In the
Sheldon act. ' Ho recommcnos a specmc
appropriation for the state university In
stead of the 1-mlll levy; the purchase of
a large fireproof safe for the storing of
bonds, which are now held to the amount
of, $8,000,000 in a safe which Is not fire
proof; ho recommends that the law be
changed so state surety companies, may
furnish a part of the treasuter's bond, as
there is no one company In the country
which can give the entire bond and the
companies refuse now to be Jointly re
sponsible. His plan Is for several com
panies to "assume a portion of the risk. In
the matter of bonds for state depositories,
Mr. Brian recommends that banks be per
mitted to file securities with some desig
nated state officer to secure state de
posits or that It be optional with the banks
whether to give a personal or surety bond.
He would establish a storage room at a
central point and permit the state Insti
tutions to receive their supplies from this
warehouse which should be In charge of a
competent storekeeper. This would permit
the state bourd to buy In wholesale lots.
He would change tho present law governing
the cash funds of the state institutions by
permitting the heads of institutions to
check against the funds for emergencies
when a permit had bee nsecured from the
state board. He would have a storage
room for the benefit of the state printing
board in cnarge of a secretary. Satlonery
books and supplies should bo contracted for
In the same manner as at present, but all
supplies should come through this storage
room and be checked out by the secretary
of the board.
Regarding slate finances Mr. Brian says:
In making this report I call your atten
tion t olno rkijid reduction In tlie stale
debt, which on December 1. lituO, was $l,slt,
Kil.21, and which on December 1, 14, ac
cording to the registered warrants In this
office, Is $7lB,670.iU, making a net reduction
during the two years uf tl.HM.lOO.iw. In
comparing the reduction the reduction as
made from December 1, 197 to July 24. lis,
I would say that the stale debt will be
entirely paid off by July iil, li, and I be
lieve that the 1 mill levy made for the re
demption of the state lndebteduess will have
answered Its purpose and It will not be
necessary to make this 1 mill levy next
year.
I would also call your attention to Inter
est returned upon state deposits In the
amount of S2S.71.4, this being $y.271.1
Rythmio Evolutions by Pretty Girls
on Staee in Afternoon.
KEN WILL HAVE TURN AT NIGHT,
To Compete for Glory of Order and
Cash Prizes.
CHARACTER DANCING ALSO LISTED
Collesr Day Flttlnsrly Wound Up with
I.arsrely Attended and Much
Appreciated Concert by
UnlTcnlty Glee Club.
Governors of Mates and pretty girls In
uniform will hold the board of the exposi
tion auditorium today, giving pl ice toward
nightfall to cohorts of uniformed men.
Maneuvers by wheel and flank mnn
uevers In squad, plntcon and company, the
rhythmic swing of marching men, cadences
so precisely defined that a metronome
might be regulated Hereby, the glenm
from a hundred axes rising and falling ns
t ne. staccato commands s precise ns tho
evolution those are what those rresent
will see Or hear.
The governors will speak In behalf of
their respective states and for the good
of agriculture. The girls and men will
drill for tho honor of their society, the
good of the order, so to sneak, and In
cidentally for tho cash prizes which have
been hung up. These prizes will be
awarded by President Wattles at th close
of the evening program.
Program Best Thus Far.
Altogether the last day of the first week
of the Corn . exposition will present the.
most attractive program thus for. The
musical feature will not be absent either
and Green's band will continue to play
popularly arranged programs throughout
the morning, afternoon and evening. For
further good measure, those who attend
the afternoon exercises will have tho op
portunity of seeing Miss Marlon Freeman
in character dancs. From the spectacular
point of view nothing so Imposing at the
competitive drills of the girls In the after
noon and the men In the evening, has been
offered an Omaha public, In a long time.
The chief executives ot sovereign states
will have their Innings in the morning.
Those who will speak are Governor
Sheldon of Nebraska. Governor Garst of
.Iowa and former Governor Brooks of
Wyoming. There will be many a cattle
men present to hear the last, for Mr.
Brooks is one ot the best known
cattleman In the west. Garst and Sheldon
are both practical farmers and their mes
sage will not be altogether academic In
nature.
Glee Club Sinus.
College day at the exposition wound, up
fittingly lust evening with the concert and
minstrel entertainment r,f the University of
Nebraska Glee clubs. The Auditorium waft
packed with auditors and the applause was
enthusiastic. The first part of the program
was strictly musical and the adjective
"musical" is not applied undeservedly.
What was nothing else than a minstrel
show occupied part two, although lt was
programed as "mlnstrtiey." Tho comedy
of Messrs. Klmmel and Earwlck never
dragged and the whistling solos ot Ireland
and the vocal of Stahl were throughly appreciated.
WEEK NEEDED TO SEE CORN SHOW
Majority of People Do Not Realise
Magnitude of Exposition.
"It requires an entire week to see the
corn show."
While students from the agricultural
colleges and farmers who visited the Na
tional Corn exposition Friday declared that
no one could see the exposition In less than
six days and see It as it should be seen,
the thousands of school, children from tho
parochial and country schools whe were
in the buildings, did not propose to be that
long about it and they kept things stirred
up the entire day.
This Is the verdict ot some who visited
the exposition Friday:
Prof. Mary F. Rausch of the Colorado
Agricultural college I am very much
surprised at the size of the corn show and
the comprehensive plan on which lt has
been organized. I am sure I cofild spend
a week here and not see It all.
John Aye of Washington County I
thought I could ni,R u in a day or two,
but it is going to take me a week.
Hon. Lie. Luis Gorozpe of Mexico Wa
will be here until the last of next week.
It Is going to take us much longer to
see the exhibits than we thought It would
and they are very Interesting."
The state exhibitors are the big drawing
cards and the students attending Friday
said they could spent a half a day wltu
profit In either the Illinois or the Indiana
exhibits.
College and High School Day.
It was officially known as "College and
High School Day," but also arranged for
the purochlal school children to attend.
These children came with the sisters and
many of them accompanied by prles:s ana
Instructors and never lias there been a bet
ter behaved crowd of children within tho
exposition gates. The sisters went with
them everywhere, to the model farms ami
the moving picture show; to tho alcohol
still and tho needle work department; from
the long alBles of prlzcj corn In the gal
leries to the alfalfa palace. There were
children of all nationalities and the Utile
visitors themselves were a show to others
who wero In th grounds. Along would
come two sisters leading by the hand
little fellows who found walking difficult.
Every child in the group would be an Ital
ian and they were as distinct from thu
American children as a group of' colored
children would be. Then another group
would be from some parochial school
where the parishioners were Bohemians or
Poles.
These children wero the ones who to-lt
some time to' see things, as did also
group of German children. Hut when tho
sisters came along with the American
children or those of Iilsh parentage, they
knew no restraint. They wanted to see
the show twice In the given length of
time, and started from the top of tho
auditorium and screaming and laughing
they poured down the runways and stopped
only when guards at the entrance to
buildings kept them from crowding and
Injuring each other.
PIrnle on Rubber Runway.
It was In a runway that a guard beard
a scream like a Blackfoot Indian Just
(Continued on Pag Six.)
( Continued on Pag Two.)
(Continued on Fourth Pag.)

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