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Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, December 13, 1908, NEWS SECTION, Image 1

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unday Bee
PART ONE
Only 10 DAYS For
Christmas Shopping
NEWS SECTION
PAGES 1 TO 8
4
7
VOL. XXXVIII NO. 26.
OMAHA, SUNDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 13, 1908 SIX SECTIONS FORTY-EIGHT PAGES.
SINGLE COPY FIVE CENTS.
LATEST LAND BILL
CONDITION OFTHE WEATHER
FOR OMAHA. COUNCIL. BLUFFS AND
VICINITY Fair and lightly colder Sun
day FOR NF.RRAfKA Fslr Sunday..
FOH IOWA-Fulr and colder Sunday.
Temperature at Omaha yesterday:
GOSSIP OF CABINET
CORN SHOW BIG HIT
ad
I 'I
c"
v
New Irih Act Great Improvement
Over Predecessors.
BIRRELL SPONSOR ' IN COMMONS
Startling1 Disclosure of Inadequacy of
Unionist Scheme.
UNDERESTIMATED MANY MILLIONS
judge Taft Has Decided Id-
UlUf 1.1!
Exposition Panes Hurrah Period and
A
it Should Be Mac
Assures Successful Results.
Hour.
6 a.
.... 33
.... S4
.... 3f
.... 87
6 a.
7 a.
ft a.
9 a.
WANTS MEN FROM THE PEOPLE
No Promotions from Clerical Positions
to Cabinet Portfolios.
CROWDS COMING FOR THIS WEEK
10
It a. m.
International Aspect Gives Great
12 m 48
AT CHRISTMAS
TIME
Festival Enlarged Influence.
i
Id. m,
The Omaha
j
i ii ill ri nun
I 1 1 I'un'b
2 p. m.
I p. m.
4 p. m.
6 p. m.
( p. m.
7 p. m.
MEN FROM MANY LANDS ATTEND
r
i i
(J.
I
ill.
1
VI
1
V
is
CONDITION OF THE CONSTABULARY
Better Far
rrorlded
Oat
and Hln-her Pension
for Coffl a Makers
of Work la
Dablta.
DUBLIN, Dec. 12. (Special.) Naturally
the. one topic of conversation In -Ireland
now la the new Irish land 'Mil which has
just been Introduced In Parliament by Mr.
Blrrcll, the chief -secretary for - Ireland,
and I am bound to say, that while some
people do not think It goes far enough the
majority of Irishmen are disposed to accept
It as a far larger measure of justice than
they had any hopes of receiving from
tlila government.
Two features stand out In the new bill.
One IS the resumption of land purchase and
the Other Is that the consequent settling of
men and women on the land that has been
given over to the bullocks. One of the side
Issues, which, perhaps, Is not less Impor
tant than the main features, Is the expo
sure of the pitiful Inadequacy of the Wynd
ham measure of 1903 and . of the ' faulty
finance of the lata unionist government.
Mr. Wyndham estimated that to buy out
the landlords of Ireland and restore the
land to the people would cost about $560,
000,000, of which ICOO, 000,000 would be paid
for the land Itself and W0, 000,000 would be
paid as a bonus to Induce the landlords to
sell, or, as It has been expressed In one of
the debates, as a "bribe to the landlords
to part wit their land for more than It
was worth." Mr. Blrrell riddled these f!g
ures In Introducing his bill and said that
It was now clear that the total expenditure
would be $900,000,000, exclusive of the bonus.
In explaining his plan for finding this
money he relieved the mind of the Irish
taxpayers.
Wyndham Art,
' Under the Wyndham act land purchase
Was financed by an Issue of bonds which
had to be sold considerably below par, the
Issue of 1160,000,000 stock to date represent
ing a loss of $17,600,000. This loss fell on the
IrlBh taxpayers, but under the Blrrell bill
the loss, If any, is to be borne by the im
perial exchequer,' The ' other feature of
the bill provides - for giving the congested
districts commissioners compulsory powers
for the pure has of land for distribution
among the oocupylnf tenants, and for im
proving uneconomic holdings, and gives
them an Income of $1460,800 a year for the
latter purpose. ' ..'.'
Borne Interesting figures Knowing the ex
tent to which the Wyndham act has worked
'are given by Mr. Blrrell.' Bo far the trans
actions completedin which the money has
been paid over to landlords represent $125,
000,000. Agreements to purchase have been
signed to the amount of (266,000.000, but the
transactions have not been completed for
want of money, and It Is estimated that
there is about $500,000,000 worth of land
remaining to be dealt with.' The landlords
have received an average of twenty-six
years' purchase for their land, which no
one can say Is not exceedingly generous,
and when the bonus is added It works out
at about twenty-eight and one-half years'
purchase. This is a high price, but Ire
land Is willing to pay if it la assured of
being rid of landlordism.
New Constabulary 3111.
Another piece of legislation which will
benefit a large number of Irishmen Is the
new constabulary bill dealing with the
pay and conditions of service of the royal
Irish constabulary. It is fashionable, I
know, to denounce the constabulary as a
foreign force maintained for the oppres
sion of Ireland, but 1t Is really one of the
f.hest police fdrces In the world and does
excellent police duty. It Is not Its fault
that it Is occasionally used by the British
government to enforce oppressive laws,
and In the hands of an Irish government It
would form the most popular body of men
in the country. The men are wretchedly
underpaid and the new bill provides for a
slight increase pay and somewhat larger
pensions. It also redresses other griev
ances and offers larger opportunities for
tho promotion 'of men from the ranks.
Wh la tulklr.g of the constabulary I may
mention that the K. I. C. possesses a bache
lor of arts strung its members. Hs is Con.
jtabls P. J. Cunn.ngham, B. A., who is now
Stationed in Dublin and who tock tils degree
fiom 'he Hoyal I'ntvuisliy of Ireland a few
months ago. He Is the only member of the
lore under commissioned rank possessing
a' university degree.
The Coffin Makers' society of Dublin,
which Is one of the trade unions of the
lilsli capital. Is comp a'nlng that times are
bad and thut Its members cannot f.nd work.
The secretary wro.e to the North Dub.l.i
bcuid of guardl.ns a few das ago com
i.lalnliix that tajp.1 were being eu.p.oycd
to mako coillns In t ie workhouse a.id de
claring it-at as the city b.'came hoaltl kr
tl.clr tia.e was declining. The guardians
were ni.ura ly enable to express any very
keen sympathy with the unemployed' colf.n
ru kerr. but they do.ldud to see that they
tot tl.e workhorse work in future.
Uf Way to Shroud Maker,
The sLiieud make: in the north, however,
seem to U: in u more indepenitnl position,
'the relieving officer complained last week
at iLe meeting of the Hal yn.en board of
gutrcluns that he had to walk four milts
u c a shroud for a dead pui.er at the
1 rice allowed by the guardians 40 c nil.
Not oi.e in U-illymena wou.d m.ks a shroud
for :oi than 31. 7i 1 he guard.aiis dec.de 4
in ti.is case to buy their own calico cnl
Lave tl.e throuda maUe In the workhou-e.
Anotlur serious wo.khouse quest! n which
in agitating the Dublin gjardihns is "Should
women smoke?" The guardlana ace no
Mason why they should not if they want to,
tr.d they Imvo been In the habit of provid
ing pipes and tobacco for the women in
sist es of the workhouse. Now, however,
the local government board has refused to
tiuss the bills, declaring that it is not de
siruble that the women should be encour
aged to smoke. The medical offloer de
lirn that tobacco is necessary to some of
the old women wh i have used it all their
lives, and that if they can got It in no
other way ha will order It for them under
the head of "medical comforts," with which
the local government board has no power
InterUrsv F. X. CULLEiN.
Resumption of Land Purchase
Provided For.
KOVIKESTI Or OCXAaT BTXAMSKtFSL
Port. Arrlred. i Sallaxl.
NW YORK Lo.lt.nl.
NIW TOHK MonttTldto ,
HALIFAX Sardinia
J?"-" iHTOnta.
OENOA Caroola
fPJIf HP. Amstaraan.
UVEHPOOL...... Diltlc
UVBHPOOL Kmp. of Brltala.
BIG DEMANDS ON TREASURY
Between Capitol and Mate Institu
tions legislature Will Have
to Para dome,
PIERRE, fl. D., Dec. 12. (Special.) The
last legislative session provided new build
ings for practically every one of the state
Institutions, and it was thought that there
would be but little demand for such Im
provements In the way of increased build
ing room for the Institutions from the com
ing session, and the Capitol commission felt
the way was clear for them to ask tho
necessary funds for the completion of that
work, with the fitting up of the building
and the grounds. For that purpose, they
will ask for approximately $4Oj,0CO. This is
o be secured by continuing the appropria
tion of the last pension for $200,000, which
has not been drawn upon, by the issuance
cf $100,000 of capltol bonds, and
authority to use $100,000 more from the sale
of capitol lands. The first $300,000 can be
cared for In the future by the sale of lands,
and the only reason for asking for the ap
propriations at the present time Is that
most of the lands yet left lie at so great
a distance from rail communication, that
to attempt to sell them at the' present time
would make a sacrifice of them. Up to the
present there, has been realised from tho
sale of lands $403,707.92. and of this $.-93,195
has been paid out, the balance of the fund
being in mortgages and deferred payments.
But the state institutions are not Intend
ing to let the matter of new buildings rest,
and the coming Bcssion will have to do sime
paring on the desires of the heads of these !
Institutions. They will come to the legisla
ture asking for approximately $1,000,000 for
that purpose The state university will ask
for $346,000, the Agricultural college wants
$185,700, the Redfield Asylum for Feeble
Minded Is willing 4o get-along with $127,000
and the rest of the Institutions think that
from $100,000 down would about fit out their
plans In a proper manner for the present..'
The capitol la under construction,-and thu j
state departments have entirely outgrown
the old ramshackle building now used, and ,'
the commission will insist that their claims
come first,, and If the. legislature agrees
with them, the other Institutions will have '
to wait for at least two years more before
they get anything very expensive In the
way of buildings.
The question of 2-cent passenger fare will
probably be pushed, as It Is a part of tho
platforms of both parties In this state at
the recent election. At present a suit is in
progress in the United States court to pre
vent the putting Into effect in the state of it
2',4-cent rate, which was ordered by the
State Railway commission, under Instruc
tions from the last legislative session. The
securing of physical valuations of railway
property for the purpose of .taxation and
rate regulation is also under wsy In the
state, and with this work only partly com
pleted, and the test case In the court on a
higher rate, just what action the legislature
may take Is an open question.
The Insurance men of the state will at
tempt to secure the repeal of the valued
policy clause of the state Insurance law.
FINGER PRINTS ONLY CLEW
New York Police Have Baffling Crime
to Solve and Almost No
Evidence.
NEW YORK. Dec. 12. With only the
bloody finger prints of the murderer to
assist them, the police today are scouring
the city for some trace or the man who
committed what now appears to be one of
the most baffling crimes in the city's
criminal history. His victim, the young
woman whose body was found last night
In a padlocked and barricaded apartment
at 137 East Eleventh street, has not yet
been identified and a thorough search of
the rooms has revealed nothing which will
aid the police in their task. Evory dis
tinguishing mark had been removed from
the woman's clothing and pictures had
been cut from their frames and burned to
gether with several pieces of paper which
may have borne addresses. On every hand
there was to be found evidence of the
crafty cars used by the murderer to baffle
pursuit.
The discovery of the crime came about
through the anxiety of the Janltress of tha
flat house to collect rent for the apart
ment, nearly two weeks overdue. The
man and woman who occupied the rooms
more than two months had paid promptly
up to the first of the present month, but
since that time the apartment had been
closed and the door locked with a padlock
on the outside and neither the man nor
the woman had been seen. Last night the
anltress decided to enter the apartment
to make sure the tenants had not removed
their trunks without "her knowledge, and
the police were called to assist her in open
irg the door.
When an entrance was forced, the
woman's body, with the hesd almost
severed, was lying on the blood soaked bed.
The room was In confusion. Broken chairs
were scattered about and wearing apparel
which had been removed from an open
trunk was strewn about the room. Under
the woman's body lay a raxor. Its edge
hacked and broken. The condition of the
body Indicated that the woman had been
dead 'not less than two weeks. On the door
knob and on the sheets were the finger
prints of the murderer.
RUEFS SENTENCE DELAYED
Jodare I.awlor Postpone Imposing;
Penalty on Ban franclse
Man Till Deeemher 1.
SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 1.-Ths pro
nouncing of sentence on Abraham Ruef,
convicted of bribery, was postponed by
Superior Judge Lawlor today until next
Saturday, December IS
KNOX FOR SECRETARY OF STATE
Burton Likely to Take Treasury if He
Does Not Land Senatorship.
HITCHCOCK POSTMASTER GENERAL
Wilson o Remain for a Time, bat
Beyond These It Is Stated the
President-elect Has Come
to No Conclusions.
(From a Staff Correspondent.)
WASHINGTON, Dec. 12.-(8peclal Tele
gram.) From many sources and with In
terviews had with Preiryjent-elect William
H. Taft, by friends of tnfe Incoming chief
executive, it is believed that Judge Taft
will select his cabinet completely from
those not associated with administration
affairs. By this It Is not meant to Insinu
ate that the present cabinet officers are
not to the liking of the incoming president,
but that he wants to surround himself with
men who come from the people and not
through the clerical branches of the govern
ment. Mr. Cortelyou, who has made a
splendid secretary of the treasury and a
most efficient postmaster general, . Is a
product of clerical advancement. This Is
true also ef several officials in the Post
office department and throughout the gov
ernmental scheme clerks have been ad
vanced to occupy positions which they are
wholly fitted . for from an administrative
point of view, but who know little or noth
ing of the wants of the people whom they
represent.
As a cabinet officer Mr. Taft has seen
these things and now that ha 1s to be In
augurated president It Is learned that he
proposes to have about htm at the cabinet
table men who represent the states and
the nation, rather than mere bureaucrats.
To this end Is Is seeking a man for secre
tary of state who will fill the place mads
vacant by Ellhu Root, and It 1s thought he
will choose Senator Philander C. Knox of
Pennsylvania, one of the very ablest law
yers In the country. v
Whltelaw Reld, ambassador to the court
of St. James, It Is understood, would like
to have the place, but "there Is nothing
doing" in that connection.
B or ton for ' Treasury. 1
Should the fate of .battle go against Rep
resentative Burton, who represents the
Cleveland district of uhlo In congress, It la
pretty generally accepted that be will bo
asked to tako the position of secretary of
the treasury, a plaee for which hs is pre
eminently fitted. Of course, Mr. Bur toll
may win the senatorship as .the successor
to Senator ForaXor, tor he occupies a strong
position with the five people In the race
Ctiarles P. Taft of Cincinnati, Qovernor-i
Harris, Senator Foraker, Harry Daugherty
and himself.
Mr. Taft, editor of the Times-Star and
brother of the president-elect, does not have
at this time anywhere near votes enough
to elect, although the. republicans have
thirty or more majority In the Ohio legisla
ture on Joint ballot. Burton will have a lot
of votes In the caucus, as will Foraker,
Harris and Daugherty, and It may be that
Instead of Taft for senator. Burton may
win out because of local conditions. That
Is neither here nor there, however, for It
Burton Is defeated President-elect Taft will
ask him to take the treasury portfolio.
As to the postmaster generalship, Mr.
Hitchcock Is still the favorite, notwith
standing the backfire which has ben
started against him, and a good guess Is
that he will land the position for which
he Is both mentally equipped and peculiarly
fitted.
WlUon to Star Awhile.
It Is generally accepted In Washington
that James Wilson, secretary of agricul
ture, will not hold the position beyond next
July. It has been Mr. Wilson's ambition
to serve the longest time of any other secre
tary of agriculture, and "Tamer Jim" will
be permitted to make that record and then
will come a change. Mr. Pinchot of the
forestry service has been very generally
slated for the agricultural position, but
from those who have had conferences with
the president-elect, the Inference has gone
out that Judge Taft believes that Mr.
Pinchot would subordinate the great De
partment of Agriculture to that of the for
estry bureau.
There will be a change in the Depart
ment of the Interior and a change in the
Department of Justice, but who are being
considered rests completely in the mind of
Judge Taft, who does not propose to make
mistakes In those two great offices.
Attorney General Charles J. Bonaparte
today Indicated that . he would not be a
member of President-elect Taft's cabinet
when, in response to an Inquiry on the sub
ject, he said that after March 4 next he
positively would retire from public life.
Although Mr. Taft has a wide knowledge
of men, his mind is open to suggestions,
tor he wants In his cabinet men of all geo
graphical sections and not men of mere
localities! Secretary Wright of the War
department will remain, but the Navy de
partment Is much In doubt. As for Com
merce and Labor, Mr. Straus has proved
himself extremely capable and the chances
are that he will remain In his present posi
tion. Dakotaas See Taft.
Senator Gamble and Mr. Cook, chairman
of the republican state central committee
of South Dakota, had an interview by ap
pointment with Judge Taft yesterday aft
ernoon. Matters of Interest to the stats
were discussed, but both the senator and
Mr. Cook refused to mske public the re
sult of tha conference. Senator Gamble
was In consultation with officials of the
Interior department today with reference
to the states of ths preliminary work on
the Staudlng Rock and Cheyenne River In
dlsn reservations. He urged that the ut
most expedition be exercised so that the
work may be completed and the reservation
opened tb settlement at the earliest pos
sible date. It la the Judgment of the de
partment that tha work of allotment alll be
completed and the appraisement and clas
sification of lands be concluded so that ths
lands may be opened for settlement in the
fall of 19U9.
Senator Gamble also took up with the de
partment the matter of two bills he recently
Introduced looking to the opening of the
surplus lands on the Pine Ridge and F. s--
I 1114 $$J,
From The Woman's 'Home Companion.
CITIES TO EXCHANGE CALLS
Omaha and Council Bluffs Will Inter-
visit on Tuesday.
STREET CAR AND AUTO PARADE
Spectacle of Vehicles Headed by
High School Cadet Battalion
Will Be Presented Golnar
Over River.
The National Corn exposition and the Na
tional Horticultural congress at Council
Bluffs .will exchange courtesies and the
people of Omaha and Council Bluffs will
do likewise: Council Bluffs will come to
Omaha Monday and Omaha will go to
Council Bluffs Tuesday.
Omaha's automobile and street car proces
sion and parade to Council Bluffs Tuesday
bid fair to be one of the largest affairs of
the sort In local hUtory. t The entire high
school battalion and band In charge of Cap
tain Oury, commanding, wl.l go by specially
assigned street cars, while another section
of ten chartered cars will bear those who
do not go by automobile. Of response to
the Commercial crab's committee, having
the matter in charge, there were twenty.
one, pledges of cars in the first mall Satur
day morning, following the sending of circu
lars Friday night, and plbdgcs to bilng their
cars have been pouring In ever since.' Each
car owner will make up his own party.
All Omsha men and women going in cars
or autos will carry cornstalks, which will
be furnished by a committee of the Com
mercial club headed by John Steele, who Is
even now scouring Douglas county- In pur
suit of a sufficient quantity. The high
school battalion will Hot be armed with
rifles like an invading army, but will also
carry cornstalks.
The battalion, tha street car crowds and
the automobiles will rendexvous at the
Northwestern station in Council Bluffs and
thence go in unbroken line to the National
Horticultural congress, for which the price
of admission Is 25 cents for adults. To
facilitate matters, tickets will be sold on
the street cars enroute. The mayor and
city council, city and county officials will
have a prominent place In the parade. There
will be only one speech at the congress. It
will be given by Rev. F. U. Love and.
Bls Business OraTanlsatlons.
The Real Estate exchange, the Dive Stock
exchange, the Commercial club and mem
bers of other bodies will be represented in
the automobile parade and many parties
are already organised. It is certain that in
both the street cars and motor cars there
will be hundreds of prominent Omaha
women and girls. The committee of the
Commercial club which has the parade In
charge includes C. W. Wllhelm, chairman;
John Steele, II. 8. Waller, E. A. Benson and
David Cole. The autos will rendesvous at
Eighteenth and Douglas streets at p. m.
and ths street care will leave Fourteenth
and Douglas streets at ths same hour.
Council Bluffs is coming in tremendous
force to the National Corn exposition Mon
day and the interchange of visits will be
one of the most impressive and felicitous
Interchanges of visits on the part of the
two cities in the annals of ths west. A
score of Council Bluffs society girls have
been pressed into service to advertise
Omaha day at the National Horticultural
congress and all day Saturday they pinned
(Continued on Fifth Page.)
PROGRAM.
Sunday.
In Concert Hall.
S p. m. Sacred concert by George
Oreen and his hand.
I'HCXl RAM.
Grand Coronation March, from "The
Prophet" Meyerbeer
(a) lienedlrtns (He Is Blessed), (b)
Adeste Fideles (Oh, Come All Ye
Faithful) '. Cherubln
The Mill in the Forest (Idyl)..Ellenberg
Ave Marie (cornet solo).. Hoffman
' Charles Nepodal.
Walts Symposia Bendlx
Trinity (a sacred lntermeiso)....Tobanl
Overture Tha Bohemian Girl. .....Buffs
Grand Sacred Potpourri Kling
March The Stars and Stripes Sousa
CONCERT.
4 p. m. Sacri'd music by the Oratorio
Society. Ira B. Pennlman, conductor,
Including selections from . choral mas
terpieces, chief of which is Handel's
''The Messiah."
Selections from "The Messiah."
Antlphonal choruses of men and
women.
"Uft Up Your Heads, O Te Gates"..
Handel
The Society.
Solo and Chorus O, Thou That
Tellest Good Tidings Handel
Miss Ruth Hanson and the Society,
Solo and Chorus Glory to God In tha
Highest Handel
The Society.
Solo and Sernl-Chorus of Men
Rhapsodle Brahms
Miss Ruth Ganson and Men's Voices.
Chorus Wonderful Counselor, the
Prince of Peace Handel
. The Society.
8 p. m. Band Concert.
RATES TO OMAHA EQUALIZED
Northwestern Geta Permission
Meet Competition from Fre
mont to This City.
to
FRBMONT. Neb.. Deo. 11 (Special.) The
Fremont .office of the Northwestern will
be ' permitted to meet the rate of the
Union Paclflo and Burlington on freight
shipments between this place and Omaha.
Notice that the permission would 1 be
granted in response to a recent request
sent to the Interstate Commerce commis
sion was received yesterday afternoon. The
reduction applies to first and second
class freight only.
For several months the Union Pacific
has had a lower rate for Omaha because
of the shortening of the distance, due to
the' Laane cut-off. The competing line ap
plied for permission to make a smllar
reduction. The Burlington also had a rate
equal to the Union Pacific
The change on the Northwestern reduce
the first class freight rate from 28 cents
to 2 cents. The second class Is reduced
from 26 cents to 23 cents.
The order permits the application of the
reduced rate to Council Bluffs and Mis
souri Valley after December 2.
"OVERTIME" CAUSE OF STRIKE
Tug-boat rw Refuse to Work Half
Hour Extra Without Pay
Trouble Kasne.
NEW YORK, Dec li Because ths New
York Central railroad's marine superinten
dent refused to reinstate a tugbcat crew
he had discharged when they refused to
work a half hour overtime last night with
out pay, the twenty-three tugs of the com
pany did not movs today. Ths crews of all
these craft, which handle the company's
floats on East and North rivers and the
hsrbor. refused to begin work this morn
ing, and added a further demand that
they be paid twice a month instead of
monthly as heretofore. Two hundred men
took part In tb strike.
Al Chriamu time rur. it Rhyn
'Ncuh Mistletoe tni Holly
A Mw mi Kin pmry Mn
When oiherwiM 'twer. Folly
He'll blea the Deyl when Syk wi Fiy
Firet wrought th. wtxen Berry.
For Mistletoe and Krne, go
To max. a ChriKmet Merry
Will lUOItTfjOIUEfiT TIAt-G
MONEY FOR PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Over Quarter of a Million Dollars in
December Apportionment.
CORRECT WEIGHT ON LARD PAILS
Offices In the State House Are Being
Rearranged Preparatory to Leavls
' latlve Session and Many
Changes Are Made.
(From a Staff Correspondent)
LINCOLN, Doc. 12.-(Speclal.)-The semi
annual school apportionment to be sent
out during the coming week amounts to
$267,132.91. The apportionment is nvade on
a basis of .72196 per pupil, there bedng Hj9.9Uo
children of school age In the state. These
figures were certified to State Auditor
Bearle by Superintendent McBrlen today,
Treasurer Brian having certified the
amount of the apportionment to Superin
tendent McBrlen.
The aggregate amount Is made up of
collections as follows: State tax, $2,227.26;
Interest on school and saline lands sold.
$29,012.20; interest on school and saline
lands leased, $&,07S.89; Interest on bonds,
$U,77tv.l; interest of state warrants. $lf,
612.36; from fish and game license, $5,28ti,
discount on bonds, $141.81.
Following Is a detailed statement of tha
number of scholars and the amount each
county will receive:
Amount
Due.
t 4,626.14
S, 499. 48
218.77
S.U2.63
1,217.27
i, 485. 99
1.138.68
6.3M.K2
S.0M8.78
$.$73.48
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8.8X0.69
6.164.84
1.648.29
1.847.23
8,737.01
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6.1W.67
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1,081.01
3.641.87
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tan
2.656.57
2,31-9.14
617.31
846.17
Scholars.
6.269
4.849
303
4
4,4'
1.656
2.374
1,577
7,464
4.292
6.IX8
6.656
6.2s9
1.103
2.323
2,190
6.061
4.061
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8,5:8
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5.176
837
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, 7,131
38,476
1,428
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...... 3.747
8.322
4.676
10,120
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1.874
214
2.8.-13
6.842
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3.768
1.021
2,64
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6.341
8.641
3.226
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374
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6.033
626
S.272
8.043
4.46U
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Adams
Antelope ....
Banner
Blaine
Boone
Box Butte ..
Boyd
Brown
Buffalo
Burt
Butler
Cas
Cedar
Chase
Cherry
Cheyenne ...
Clay
Colfax
Cuming
Custer
Dakota
Dawe
Dawson
Deuel
Dixon
Dodge
Douglas ....
Dundy
Fillmore ....
Franklin ....
Frontier ....
Furnas
Gage
Garfield ....
Gosper
Grant
Greeley
Hall
Hamilton ...
Harlan
Hayes
Hitchcock ..
Holt
Hooker
Howard ....
Jefferson ...
Johnson ....
Kearney ....
Keith
Keya Paha
Kimball ....
Knox
Lancaster ..
Lincoln
Iigan
Loup
Madison ....
McPherson .
295 81
4,047.
14.C33.26
8,204.91
270.01
490.24
4,365.76
179.78
2.862.36
2.1- 6.27
8.2-20..I7
2.961.68
4.6M 26
2.701.85
Merrick ....
N' ance
Nemaha ....
Nuckolls ...
Otoe
pawnee
(Continued on Fifth Page.)
Governors' Day Attractive, with
Woman for Its Chief Mag-net
MRS. SHELDON'S FINE ADDRESS
Oarst, Brooks and Chief Executive ef
Nebraska In City Sacred Con
cert for This Afternoon
and Evening;.
. ATTZXTBAirCa.
First day 10,603
eoond day 11,037
Third day io,ai
The success of the National Corn expo
sition from every standpoint is now assured.
From the first tho success of the educa
tional and show features of the exposition
were certain and the liberal attendance pf
the first four days forecasts a great In
flux of visitors for the last week of the
show, and thus the financial success of the
giant enterprise.
Men of national and International repu
tation have Visited the exposition during the
last week and one and all have been un
stinted In their praise. ' Ambassadors from
foreign lands, ' members of Parliaments,
governors of neighboring states, railroad
magnates from a distance, all have been
fulsome In praising the efforts of the man
agement In assembling the largest and best
exhibit of corn and products ever shown in
the United States. v
Saturday eclipsed all previous records In
the matter of adult attendance of visitors,
and the hotels are now taxed to handle the
people who have come from afar. Fra
ternal Society and Governors' day was
voted by all as a great success, and even
the ample room provided by the manage
ment for. lectures and drills was packed.
Now that the hurrah Incident to the open
ing Is over the lecturers have gotten down
to business! and all over the show may be
seen groups of Interested listeners, hearing
the gospel of Intensive farming preached
by those schooled In the leading universities
and agricultural colleges of the west. Over
200 persons gathered In the booth of the
Iowa exhibit at one time Saturday after
noon to learn the proper method of corn
propagation', and this wsa but one of the
many of such groups In tle different sec
tions of the exposition.
, Mrs. Sheldon Makes the Hit.
Governor Brooks of Wyoming and Gov
ernor Garst of Iowa mud able speeches at
the National Coin exposition Saturday
n orning, but 'all the laurels of the day
were snatched from them by a woman.
Mrs. George L. Sheldon, called on to apeak
.In place of her husband without previous
warning to her, made a five-minute address
which moved the big autfene to tremen
dous enthusiasm, and whon she had con
cluded nobody cared a hang that pressure
of official business had kept the governor
of Nebraska from attending.
Governor Sheldon did arrive' In Omaha,
but too late for the exercises at the ex
position. "If the Country Life commission will de
vise some means of providing the farmer'
wife with help sho will take car of ths
social calendar herself," declare 1 Mrs. Shel
don. "It is no light propos.tlen for a woman,
often of eiel.cati health, by herself, to care
for all that the management of the do
mestic end of a farm Involves, and to go
beyond this, to make a horn artistic as
well as hygienic. Is something rather ardu
ous. Personally, I enjoy :arm lit, but It
Is difficult, you know, to get maid to stay
on a farm. When on has to send washing
five or six miles to get It done, or do it
one's self, and when many other problem
of this sort arise you can understand that
the wife of tho farmer has little .time to
plan social entertainments."
Mrs. Sheldon Practical. - ' '
Mrs. Sheldon made a practical suggestion
along this Una that laundries for farmers
be established, the foundation of which ane
tsald would relieve many women, w.lllng
and able to pay for this work, of a great
burden.
"We hesr much of education aa a means
by which the burden of the farmer will bo
lifted," she continued. "I might make one
suggestion along this line. Why not utilise
our Indian schools to educate Immigrants
In an agricultural way, requiring that a
course of study and work in these school
be made a condition of entrance Into the
United StatesT If this were don the great
labor problem which confront the farmer.
of course, as well as his wife, might be
solved to some extent at least. This sug
gestion," added Mrs. Sheldon modestly, "1
original, even if It Is not practical."
Mrs. Sheldon, when she was called upon
to speak oy former Governor Crounae, who
presided, waa not seated on the stage, but
was In a chair In the front row of ths
exposition auditorium. She was In ths
company of Mr a. A. D. Brandels, chairman
of the entertainment committee for women
visitors; Mrs. Warren Garst, wife of the
governor of Iowa, and Mrs. J. B. WrlgUg
of Lincoln. All four were handsomely
gowned. Mrs. Sheldon wearing a tailor,
made dress of green broadcloth, with a
yoke of real lace, the 'yoke being outlined)
by some sort of brown embroidery. Her
hat had a plume or aigrette or somsthlng
or other feathered flouting from it. (The
description does not orstc-nd to be expert)
Carat and Brooks.
Although Mrs. Sheldon won as many
honors as an Indiana corn grower. It must
be said that the audience, which was by
far the largest morning gutherlng so far,
heard two excellent addresses from Gov
ernors Garst and Brooks. The former spoke
first. The chairman of the day, after being
Introduced by President Wattles, had made
some humorous references to the Intimate
relations between Iowa and Nebraska at
an early day, particularly the way Iowans
came over to vote. Governor Garst re
turned the compliment, stating that Ne
braskaus mixing up In Pottawattamie and
Harrison county politics was not exactly
an unheard of thing. Mr. Gam's address
had to do with the spirit of altruism which
is permeating the American people St the
present day und with particular reference
to agricultural conditions. He urged the
wide establishment of manual training and
agricultural schools, saying in part:
The necessity for Improved farm condt.
tlons, from a national standpoint, was em
phasised and given due force and direction
by the appointment of a oomtulaelon b
y
-J
o
D
r,
a
r-
I
k V
9'.
a 1
K
u
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( Continued oa Fifth Page.)
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