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Omaha daily bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, November 05, 1912, The Bee's Home Magazine Page, Image 9

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SILK HAT HARRY'S DIVORCE SUIT
, BPArJD . , v ilfinffiiiiiinininnnTIII A p0 B60B IS 1 " -.r
I NewKeu-y J-bre tTGo Hlra rTTI ( 'wledop- ,
. yy ,,l:6c wpm , i ( f , . ....
j
Dorothy Dix's Article on
Mother's Talks vs. Mother's Pies
It is the Former that Guides When We
Reach Life's Crassroads.
By DOKOJJIY DIX.
A man recently made the, statement
that it is a pity that we don't remember
mother's talks as low? as we do mother's
pies.
Ah, but wo do! The thing that wo
remember longest
on earth, that
makes us what we
are, that is part
and parcel Of what
wo call character.
Is the memory of
what mother said
to us".
In the great crises
of the llfe'wo don't
stop to reason. Wo
act on impulse,
and the thing that
decides us is not
the wisdom, nor
the learning; nor
the philosophy that
wo have acquired
in our maturer
years, it is the principles that have been
bred In us, the ideals that have been
Grounded In us in our childhood. 1
It is the memory of some talk we have
had with our mothers In a solemn twi
light; It is the memory of old sings sun?
abovo us in our cradle; of whispered
prayers by our bedside; of talcs of high
and herolo daring that have been our
' mother's bedside stories that give us the '
courage and the strength to stand up
and do man's or a woman's part in the
world.
Or else it is the memory of a mother's
whining and complaints; of the false
standards she Inculcated in us; of her
envy and greed and selfishness that
makes us weaklings In our hour of temp,
tntlon, so that we choose the easiest waj;
Just as our mother's pics give us
physical nourishment or dyspepsia, so our
mother's talks glvo us tho big, broad
uane outlook on life, or leaves, us poor,
bilious, jaundiced; disgruntled creatures.
Many a child's stomach is ruined by its
mother's booking. Many a child's morals
are wrecked by its mother's conversation.
The importance of a talk that a child
, has with .Its mother is something that
cannot be overestimated, and tho pity of
Jt is that mothers do not reallzo this, and
that they do not take the tlmo.and the
trouble 'to have more real heart-to-heart
talks with their little ones, and to keep
the conversation of .the home at a high
level.
Scientists tell us that up to the age of
10 60 per rent- of the impressions that are
made on a child's mind are permanent
ones. Practically everything that little
Johnnie and little Susie, playing about
The highest point of woman's hap
piness is reached only through moth
qrhood, in the clasping of her child
.within her arniB. Yet tho mother-to-be
1b often fearful of nature's ordeal
and shrinks from the suffering inci
dent to its consummation. But for
nature's ills and discomforts naturo
provides remedies, and. in Mother's
friend is to he found a medicine of
great Talue to every expectant mother.
It Is an, emulsion for external
application, composed of ingredients
which act with beneficial and sooth
!n& effect on those portions of tho
uystcm involved. It Is intended to
prepare the system for the crisis, and
thus relieve, in great part, the suffer
ing through which the mother usually
passes. The regular use of Mother'
Friend will repay any mother In the
comfort it. affords before, and the help
ful restoration to health and strength
it brings about after baby comet.
Mother's Friend
is for sale at mm .j .c
1 M
tree book for "
t moth-
ers which contains mucn yaiuama
, , manv sunAatlnng of
Information, and many suggestions ox
a helpful nature.
SHADF1IL9 REGULATOR CO., AUaaU. Ce.
your knee, are hearing they will carry
through life with them. They are himiaji
phonographs that will go repeating your
Ideas, your thoughts, your, sentiments for
the next forty or fifty years. How vital
then that they shall hear only the things
worth while.
Yet the woman who considers it almost
a religious duty to properly sterilize the
children's milk bottles never bothers to
sterilize her conversation. Nothing would
induce her to feed her little ones on un
clean food, swarming with bacteria, hut
she doesn't hesitato to let their saber,
hungry little minds -gorge themxelves on
putrid gossip that is alive with sugges
tions that will poison tholr souls.
Mothers bandy about a lying old prov
erb that says that "what poes In at one
ear, of, a child comes out at tho other."
nut this Is not true. What goes In at a
child's car lodges there and germinates.
ind at last .flowers into action, good or
bad. As a very small example of this,
tnke merely a child's grammar. All chil
dren that are decently dressed look very
much alike. You couldn't hazard a guess
from tho appearance of a dozen little
Buster- Brown boys or Peter Thompson
girls if you met them away from their
parents ns to which sort of people they
came from.
But talk to them, and in two minutes
you have the family pedigree. You know
whether they belong to educated and cul
tivated families or to Ignorant ones; you
know even the family's outlook on llfo.
Tho child's grammar, his choice of
words and phrases, his attitude toward
the other children, whether he Is en 'lous
or Rnobbish or gentle, till you absolutely
know exactly what sort" of a mother ho
has and tho kind of conversation he Is In
the habit of hearing at home.
If a little girl novcr hears her mother
talk of anything but clothes and fashion
and social climbing, can you wonder that
she grows up to think that those things
are tho most important things in the
world and the objects most to be striven
for?
If fa. little girl hears her mother and
father continually quarreling and hurling
hideous recriminations at each other, can
anybody expect her to grow up with any
high ideals of married life? Zns't she
really foreordained for the divorce court
by her mother's precepts?
On the contrary, if a little girl hears
nothing from her mother's lips but high
and noble thoughts; If she hears ,her
motuer talk about the beauty and the
strength that come from self-sacrifice
and devotion to duty; if she hears her
mother constantly giving utterance to
llDeral views, I It not as sure as anything
can humanity be that such a little girl
will grow up to be a big, broad-minded
woman who will bless tho world as long
as she lives in it?
We are always being called upon to
mingle our tears with those of some
mother whoso son has gone astray and
brought dlegrace and sorrow upon her,
I wonder if it isn't the mother's talk
that ninety-nine times out of a hundred
has started the boy on the wrong road?
How can tho woman who brags pf the
souvenirs she has stolen from hotels and
rastaurants blame her son when he turns
out a thief? llow can the woman who
thinks It clever to relate how she cheats
her husband by getting money from the
tradesman that Is charged on the bills
as merchandise be surprised when her
son falsifies his accounts? How can the
mother whose talk has all been of ex
pediency and not of right expect her son
to have rock-bound principles?
It Is mothers' talks, and not mother's
pies, that stays by us through life, It's
mother's talks that wo remember when
we stand at the crossroads and we take
the straight and narrow path or the
broad downward highway, according as
we recollect the directions the has given
UK.
UrrfOJjty In HnorlnK.
"Mj gradfafher unbred, my father
nored, my mother snored, and I have
always anored. Edward never nore. He
no on of mine," These fsw 'ne n
the will of Edward Arther Bentlnch
Monckton, Iiaron Iletherington. have
thrown a huge estate Into the protiate
couit pr England and question the If (fill
macy of the succeeding heir The late
Varons nephew claims succession to tho
main unor tno win nnl win also Jay
"? la-eragc. -jno man wno rot
y haB been accepted ai Uie lawful
fQn ct the oia Iord ha, entered a cavoat
alleging that the will U prima far'o proof
in 3 j. iimwu 3 i. iijat ki-i jo
tracing national .ntirmt -New Vorv
i Tribune,
THE BEE: OMAHA, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1912.
The
LOVELORN LUCV HAD MSVteRED
ALA COMERS t07 ONE
THCWC CAME f TfiTLCGRAM THAT
STALLED HER. SMC COULVHT
READ IT SO SHE COLLED tH
OLD TCRRy WHO HAD XtCCH
THcwe since, the Nerw$PAPa?
WAS SET Y HAND. Me READ
IT JftlAHT Off TWE Br AND
fhin Ttrc. i t flsxpjj
" if n omtir stepped
ON YOU TOC WOULD IT
MAKE YOUR FOOT DfWNL? '
UP WITH THE NAPKINS
BOV&! HERE COMES
THE SOUP
wpU ha!
HALT
OR Ll
ft DESCRTCR
SHOOT,'
"Be Natural and You Will Be Beautiful," Says
Pretty Miss Alice Brady
Dy MAHOAKKT HUUBARD AYKK.
"The play's Just sweet," tjald tho mis
treBS of tho warodrabe at tho play house,
an she took my eloak. "And Alice UraJy,
she's Just too Sweot. too,"
Taken as a dramatic criticism, the
statement inny lack a arlety of ad
jective but 1 have often noticed that
the woman who keeps tabs on tho hats
and coats of the audience forms a. pretty
accurato opinion of the merits of plays
and playets.
"Little women" Is sweet,, and so Is
Alice Brady. Even the two fat men with
bald heads who sat in front of me audibly
remarked that they thought It wus going
to bo a musical comedy, but somehow ti
"got you," and after little Ueth died they
blew their noses with a flourish, showing
that all sentiment was not dead 'beneath
ho adipose deposit which surrounded
their Broadway hearts.
Alice Brady plays Meg, tho eldest of
the dear, delightful March girls, and aha
plays it so, well that nobody Is going to
be able to remember whether Meg's last
name was Brady, or Alice's was March.
Miss Alice la tho daughter of Manager
Brady, as every one knows. But I think
that Miss Alice is showing tho world
that she could have succeceded even If
she had had no connection with tho
theatrical world, for nobody in any of
tho companies in which- sho has been
playing works harder than "the man
ager's daughter," nor has risen more
legitimately on her own merits.
Behind the stage Miss Brady, who is
Btlll In her 'teens. Is a pretty, winsome
young girl, with a very animated face,
big, brown cyea and an Interesting and
Interested expression.
It was my duty to haul out that
weather-beaten question, "What do you
do to preserve your health and beauty?"
and I took It out, dusted It off. propped
It up and presented It In the best light
and to the best of my ability.
"Ugh!" said Miss Atlcc, as she opened
her eyes very wide and looked scared.
"What do you want me to soyT I don't
know anything about health and beauty.
I've never done anything about either In
my life. Why. I do all the things that
one oughtn't do. I eat wuat I want, and
as much ns I want, and when I want,
and I Just love ice cream sodas."
"Enough, enough this will never do,"
I Interposed In stern topes. "Bernember,
especially in this play, you are a nort of
example for hundreds of thousands of
young girls, who will do as you do, and
If Meg loves Ice cream sodas, what will
happen to the complexions of the rest
even If hers doesn't suffer?"
This was a truly sobering thought, and
MIks Brady sat down to reflect, I had
time to notice (hat her dimples aru her
own, and that she pouts and beams un
consciously, and Is qulto unspoiled by ner
success and advancement on the stage.
She seemed much pleased when I told
her that I had noticed how hard sho
worked In the heot of summer, when she
was slngtng In the revivals of the Oil
bert & Sullivan operas.
"I love to do thore especially Patience,"
raid Miss Brady, cheering up ns tho
health and beauty subject faded Into
the distance "I'm glad you think I
worked hard. I wonder If father will be
lli vc that' she reflected,
' I wanted to be la tills play because f.
Defendant Saved His
Copyright. 1!U3. National
"l MAY Hflve LOOT MY CHARM AND EAUTY
Birr i sTai. TCETflm my omuaH laughtcr"
&ENTL,eMrN DC SEATED
TA-r?A-J?A-TA
INTCKLOGUTOR-TAMDqiSAW YOU
STflNDIN& ON THC CONNER
YESTERDAY WITH A CflBBAGe f(
YOUR ABN&
TAMBO-VES SUM. I WAS WAITIN TO
A CAR TO COME OUONG AN' I WA9
CARRYIN'DE CABDAffC fO' A
PAHTICULAH REASON.
INTERLOCUTOR-FOR. WHAT
PARTICULAR REftSOrtr
TAMBO-WELL IF DC FUST COR
JDAT CAME A I-ON HAPPENED TO
DC TOO CROvVUED I WA6
CARRYIN' DG CAODAtfE So COULD
TAKC DE CAR AjHEAP
CALL R COP.'
GO AHEAD
inn I rww i
Yoy up
ON THE
LOOK-OUT?,
AND SHOOT)
MI88 ALICE BItADV, ST
want to show that I can act a little,
too,' she continued. "Of course, I do not
mean to give up my singing, for there It
so much varluty In the slngfiug parts.
I'm afraid work would get rather mon
otonous If I stuck to dramatic work
algue, But, oh dour, you want inu to
iay something about health nnd beauty,
don't you? Well, 1 don't know anything
about It, really, But one thing Is certain,
you can't tell what kind of a girl Is go.
lug to look beautiful on the stage. I've
nottccd that really beautiful girls, with
classin features und all that, look quite
inslgnlflcont when they're made up ln
front or the footlights. Personally, I
th'nk beauty Is a matter of expression
and coloring, quite ns muh as perfect
outline I lovo rxquHlt" lorlng of hair
and complex on and rye-
, 'To bo beautiful It must bg natural
v
1
1 1
Kelly, but Lost a Battle Drawn for
News Ass'n, VV
IT WAS DINNERTIME AT THE"
JAli-. CVERYTH INO WAS QUIET
WITH THC BXCCPTION Or THC
RATTM5 OfTHE KNllfiS AND
PORK 6 WHEN ALL OF A SUDDeM
A VOICE FROM THE VIOLeNT
WARD WAS HEARD TO YEL?
"TALKING- ABOWT.OASeOALL
l&NV TWe u.Lio&TBre'
&TJCWbRK PRETTY GOOD?"
STEP RIGHT in LADIES
AMD GENTLEMEN
WE ftRE OUST ABOUT
TO FEED THEM
:
fo TWE BOOS
TMVT POT
THE CROV IN
VYtLL
Doyoo
KNOW
WHO
WHO
ARC
VOU?
A It OF "LITTLE WOMEN"
of course, for you novcr get the right
combinations If you change the coloi
that nu turn gave, I like faces that are
full of cxprHlon, nnd I am afraid that
I don't consider tho chlna-doll beauty
very fascinating,
"And speaking of dolls, hnvo you noticed
that ull the now dolls liavo real face
like children? Not llko the old-fashioned
dolls, who are always impossibly bcauti
ful.
"11 fu-eins that children nowadays pre
fer dolls that have expression, and I think
(hat the children are right. Probably, it
j mean, that we are getting away from th
Ideal of doll-llko bvuuty which lacks ex
presslon and Intelligence. Certainly, 4t I
significant when tlltlo children turn away
from tho beautiful French dolls and tak
the funny life-like babies, whose facta
aro so full of expression that It seems
, ft f they coud almost talk,"'
t
Modern Women and
illy WINIFItEi) lUiAClC.
Dr. Henry Meado, ncrvo specialist nnd whan I was young bolng alone was con
nclontlst In general, wvi'a that tho new sldered a kind of. lonesome business-
kind of American girl Is fine for the
men, but tho worst sort or thing for
the children.
"Tho clever, brill
iant, sulf.sufflclcnt,
Independent girl
of today Is mak
ing over the men,"
iys Dr. Mcaae,
"Men nren't the
boyish anlmuln
they were a gen
eration ago. They
can't ho nnd keep
up with tho women.
But where arc tho
children coming
In These clever
women don't want
to Btop being clover
t6 have children until they are about
M. and then It Is too late."
All over the land Indignant "modem
women" aro rising to deny, with sound
and fury, the impeachment ho has made
of them, and in tho MO rrpllrH I liavo read
tho ono roal thing thn clover women say
Is "economic conditions.". '
"Econonilo condltlonsl" Where have I
heard that j)hra before? Oh. yes. It's
what they sny when thoy want- to tell
why a woman kills her husband and
runs away with another man. It's the
phrase they uso when they explain why a
in on robs the mutt who pays him a salary.
It's what they say nowadays when a little
girl tells her mother to mind her own
business and She'll Blind hera.
"Economic condition!" What a con
venient phrase It Is, to he sure! I wish
I was quite posltlvn that I know Just
exactly What It means. It enn't be that
It Is Just the wages that people get can
It?
1 wonder Just how much wages have to
do with thn "no children at our flat" fail
Just now? Not so very much In my
opinion not hulf so much us some peuplo
seem to think.
You cun't ttamp out a great pilhial In
stinct with a mere matter of wages. As
a matter of fact , tho poorer people ar
the mora children they have.
I was talking with the finest old lady
I know nbout It this very day, 'and he
suld
"WVll, I used to think tho women who
didn't want children was unnatural, but
I've been vlstlng round among my
daughters and sons and I feci different
about It.
"Thpro's Mary, Jdhn's wife, jthe sweet
est girl 1 know or was years ago. What
Mary is now Is u lonesome, noglected
woman, with a. mouth turned down at
the corners and a disposition turned
own nil around, I don't wonder at It
I did till I visited her, but now don't.
"Mnry has two children, lovely little
things, and that's all sho has got that
ml h man to pay tho hills. 8he hasn't
uy husband, not what I call a husband,
at all, John belongs to three clubs, nays
Mary Is so busy with thn children nil
the tlmo he has tn have somo company,
lid hu has It fit trto club.
'Mary's little John hud the croup when
I was there und Mary nnd I sat up with
him till 4 o'clock. John camn In about
II o'clock from the club, looked sorry for
while and, then sad he'd have to get
some sliep, as he had a big deal on the
next duy. That deal wasn't big enough
to keep hliu at home resting, I noticed
Just big enough to leave tho little boy to
us all night.
' 'What du you do, Mary, when I am
not here?' I asked, when little John was
breathing rosier und looked as If ho'd
drop off to sleep In a minute or so,
" 'Oh,' said Mary, 'I fight it out alone.'
Then I knew what made her look so
down In the mouth all the time.
Fight It out alone! Most of the new
kind of mothers seem to do that, and
THE SECRET OF XXKNCx LIFE.
Do not sep tho springs of life by neglect of tha trasi&a saeehoaka. by aftowiag
the accumulation of poUoos in the system. An imitatioa of Natare's Method ej
restoring watte of tissue and imporcriJ latent of the blood end aerroas itneof th is
to take an alteredro glycerin extract (without sloohol) of Goldea Seal esd Orejoa
grape root, Bloodroot. Stone and Mandrake root with Cherrytiark. Over 49 yetrs
tto Dr. Pierce care to the publio this remedy, whioh ha oaHed Dr. Pleroo's Goldea
Medical Discovery. He found it would help the blood In taking Bp the proper ele
ments (rota food, help the lirer iato activity', thereby throwia oat the polteas f rosa
the blood end vitaUsJoJ the whole system as well as allaying and eoofhiaj a aeufh.
No one ever takes oold Tmtos oonatlpated, or exhausted, sad kar what we
, Uss-PoxX, tfaaias health.
The Bee bv Tad
A IIU; IV ,V CAV
Economic Conditions I
inaybo it's different now.
"What's tho tnatter with marrlagn now
adays, nnyhoW? When I married wo ex
pected to be. .together that's whnt we.
married, , for. My hushand didn't go.somo
whem else for his fun; ho took It home
or took me with him.
"Who would want to stay at home with
tho children while husband goes out play
ing golf or beating somo. ono at somo
championship billiard thing or other? It
taken two to bring up a family, or It tSd.
in my day, and those we have got to
close together all the time.
I had eight children and my husband
and I brought 'em up together. We hail
our fun at homo with tho children, anil
every child no had was that much mora
fun for us all.
"What do thoy want the women to. do-
bo tho old-fashioned mother, while they
don't coma within n lnllo of being thai
old-fashioned father?"
I wonder If there's any truth in what
the good old ytrundmothcr nald. There
can't bo-there wasn't a word about
"economic conditions" In hor whole dis
course. Where Race3 Rub Elbows
Within half a minute's walk of the
Columbia university library In Now York
there Is a flvc-story building which houses
under ono roof students from every
quarter of tho globe, Japanese, CBlnese,
Turks and Hindus llvo In peace, and
amity with Amorlcans, Austrlans,4 Ger
mans nnd French. The building in 'which,
nil this takes place Is the Cosmopolitan
club, nt 65t West Ono Hundred and-iFour-teenth
street.
Thn Cosmopolitan club was organized,
three years ago by the foreign students)
in Columbia university, and since, then
li us. taken in nearly all of the foreign,
students In tho city. Last year there
were 250 students from foreign lands
studying in New York's- educational Jn-stltutlons-HO
ut New York university,
ninety-eight at Columbia arid th'e re
mainder In Union Seminary, the Colleger
nf the City of New York and oUter local
schools and colleges, o
Theru 'are more than 100 Chines anew
Japanese students, twenty-five OttpmanJ
fifteen Hindu and about 100 others, Inn
eluding twenty from Italy, twenty-nine!
from Austria, fifteen from Qermany,
thirteen from England, ten from Hungary)
and seven from Jloumanla. Many otl
these liavo been sent to the United Btate
by their governments to prepare thm for
positions of prominence in their homw
lands.
Tho charges for roams are considerable
less than what the students would have,
tn pay If they lived In any of the cpllegsi
dormitories, or private boarding houses!
near the college campus. I
Board la also very cheap, so that thoj
club in a measure represents tho foreign,!
students' solution of tho high cost 0i
living problem.
In order that good-fellowship shall bo
the keynote of these gatherings the club
has made a rule that no two students of,
tho same nationality should sit beside ona
another, and the result was last year that
one could find a Turk breaking bread
with an Italian and Hindus, Chinese,
Japanese and Danes holding eminent con
vernations in English. New York Bun.
A a to Worry,
"Don't worry" U 6- and 10 cent 7tiiUM
sophy.
Worry Is a suro sign of insanity. Luna
tlca never worry.
Happy toaicatt Nine lives, and never
worried by insurance agents!
Worry ull you want to. It's one thins
that (Joesn't cast any more. Judge.
oau mi-KriB0n,wuicQ u strenura ua uaferenattea eieea
end exkasMdoa of aerre fore. The "Dbecnrvcy U M ii
rowd tesdo wfcloa restore tea, to tbe blood, erres and
heart try isaiutisi Natsre's methods of restoring1 VMts
ef tbeae,ad feeding; the aerrm, heart aad twas a fish
rad blood.
"I foSmd from pain en4r ay HeM sbnaler Ws4e ales ymm
K. V. nuoBaSMia, N. T. KsjTSw iMsms aaeton r4 aa Hd
to aar good. Bocae mii I had ewnBaisMiy cwa sate I Wnett aw.
tebSTetaeperatJou. I was WrUdta. am Us to alt a ste rawitti
and was aothlnjr bat a are sVetntiwy. In iWaj ax to MJk Sc.
Pleroo's Ooidtn Medical EHaomrr n Sr. Hsra'aTI sssat TSeU.
Whan I had taken ona boUla el tha 'DUeorsry'I esaU ah B aa,
hour at a tima. and wban I had takan tana fcattlaa I aanw jt my
eookiiur and tand to tha chfldran. ' ' -
Hr veixU fcaev 17 petuwit.

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