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Daily capital journal. (Salem, Or.) 1903-1919, October 12, 1910, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99063957/1910-10-12/ed-1/seq-1/

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FULLPRESS SERVICE OVER OUB OWN LEASED WIRE. PORTLAND3MARKET REPORTS DAILY. YOU GET TODAY'S NEWS.TODY.
SAIiUM, OUKGOK, VR I N I5S DAY, OCTOIIRK 12, 1010.
No. 30.
HIHIl PHNlf QlllfIS ARE TIlftEfiTENEB
o ,
FAMINE AND PESTIlCE
FOLLOW IN PATH OF IRE
PROPERTY LOSS $20,000,000
List of Dead Now Placed at 150, But It Is Probably Much
Larger Hundreds of Men' Are Engaged in .Burying the
Carcasses of Animals to Prevent Pollution of Streams
Government Has Taken Charge of the Work and Relief
Trains Are Being Sent as Fast as- Damaged Condition of
Roads Will Permit.
International Falls, Minn., Oct. 12.
Famine and pestilence follow today
In the ashen path of the great forest
fires that have swept this region, In
flicting grfcat foss of life and tre
mendous damage to property.
Hundreds of men from the remains
of villages and from fire-scorched
towns are at work under the rifles of
the national guard, burying carcasses
of cattle and other live stock killed In
the whirlwind of Are.
The stench arising from the decay
ins and charred flesh is terrible, and
he volunteer and compulsory sanltajy
corps are working night and day to
prevent the contagion of streams
and the spread of a great epidemic.
The water at Beaudette and Spooner
already is contaminated, but condi
tions at War Road have improved.
Governor Eborhardt orderpd the
surgeons' cf fV national jjuTi 3
take command of and supervise the
work of sanitation. Militiamen and
citizens, under the direction of Gen-
1 We ' Are Now Doing j
The greatest business in tho history of our store and tho reason why? because we are giving the people
values and lower prices than they can get elsewhere. You may rest assured that when you come to tho Chi
cago Store. to spend your'' money that you will cot values and prices that will be hard to beat.
Suits
Values
- Now on Sale for $8.50, $10.50; $12.50
These suits arc up to the mluuto
sold the same way. Only $8.50,
New Silks
Tho greatest stock in Salem to make your selec
tion from; all the latest Persian and fancy dress
and waistlngs silks at wonderfully low prices.
Persian Silks, yd 65c, 75c and 98c.
Fancy dress silks, d, 25c 35c 46c & up
The
Greater
The Store
oral Wood, are distributing supplies,
while relief corps are attending to
the Injured. General Wood has asked
for additional troops to preserve or
dor and to assist in burying bodiesv
Lumbermen have been detailed to
bring in the bodies found in isolated
sections. These men nowsay that
the total deaths will not exceed 150.
Seventeen unidentified dead were
burled in a trench at Beaudette; tho
bodies having been burned so that
"identification was impossible.
Martial law Is still in force at
many points. The fires have swept
westward, and today are reported as
threatening destruction to Poposky,
Nebish, Kelliher, Black Buck, Funk
loy, LongworthClear River, Cedar
Bend and Rlchwood.
Lumbermen now estimate the loss
at between ?15,000,000 and $20,
000,000. All able-bodied men at Kelliher
wore ordered Into the Are lines today.
Another detail of men was rushed to
' Stylish Millinery Like the Picture
Now on Sale
The greatest showing in Salem of
fashionable Trimmed Hats, Ostrich
Plumes and Wings.
$5.00, $7.50, $8.50
Trimmed Hats now on
sale for
$2.50, $3.50, $3.90
Ladies'
1 ailored
Like the Picture
up to $15.00, $18.00 and $20
in style, material and workmanshlpp;
$10.50 and $12.50,
Chicago Store o1
That Hammers Down
Great Prune Shipment.
Boise, Idaho, Oct .12. More
than $1,000,000 worth of fa-
mous Idaho prunes, grown in
tho Boise, Payette and Weisor
valleys were shipped East this
season. Ten hundred and fifty-
three cars of prues were ship-
ped from this territory from
August 13 to October 2, when
practically the last car of
prunes went out. There aro
1000 crates of prunes to the
car, or a total shipment amount-
lng to' 1,053,000 crates, which
sold from 85 cents to $1.05 per
crate. At this rate tho prunes
shipped East will return to the
Idaho growers the sum of $1,-
000,350.
Funkley and another to Black Duck.
A spirit vuqunechable was shown
in a message from Beaudetto, asking
that hundreds of carpenters be sent
to Beaudette and Spooner to aid in re
building. Tho towns will be rebuilt
as one, and hereafter will be known
as Beaudette.
StKl.He Talked.
UNITED J I I hli LEASED WIRE.
Springfield, 111., Oct. 12. Colonel
Roosevelt arrived in Springfield at
10:50 o'clock today, remainng ex
actly five minutes in the city.
"During that time the colonel took
occasion to reiterate what he has
p:iv!ou,sly said, ou -'crooked busi
ness." He paid his especial, though
brief respects (a "crooked" politicians.
i
j
!
r vzrm v for
bought at bargain prices and
New Dress Goods
Thousands of yards to select from of this season's
, newest styles and materials all selling at wonder
fully low prices.
Yd. 25c, 35c, 49c, 66c and up
The Prices
Stopped Food Trains.
Paris, Oct. 12. The Strlk-
era at Colombes stopped two
food trains bound for Paris, re-
leased all the livestock in the
cars and destroyed all the food-
stuffs.
Labor leadors declared this
afternoon that if the strikers
aro forced 'to join the reserves
they would retaliate by shoot-
lng their own officers and com-
mandants.
Troops have been called to
guard tho Bordeaux express
train on the Orleans line, tho
crew of which struck, blocking
up traffic on tho lino.
Gunboat Princeton Lands Ma
rines at Amalapa Valla
dares, Commandante, Says
He Is Runningthe Port.
WILL EXECUTE PRISONERS
Sends Insulting Dispatch to Homlur
un President and Serves Notice on
Him Tlmt Ho Will Evecutc Kvery
American ami British Prisoner nt
the First Hostile Demonstration
Believed Prisoners Have Already
Keen Killed.
San Salvador, Oct. 12. The
American gunboat Princeton today
prepared to land marines at Ama
pala, Honduras, to liberate Ameri
cans held prisoner by the Amapal.i
commandante, who ran amuck three
days ago. The Princeton arrived at
Aniapala yesterday and demanded of
Valladares, tho commandante, that
ho surrender.
"I am not subservient to Ameri
can pigs," was the defiant roply ut
the official, who prior to the arrival
of the gunboat had been ordered by
President Davilla of Honduras to
meet the demands of tho United
States. '
Valladaro's reply to Davilla was
an insubordinate despatch stating
that the "commandanto of Ama
pala, Senor Don Carlos Valladares,
wns running tho port and refused to
obey."
Valladares has the whip hand, ac
cording to latest despatches. He
has notified the Ilonduran president
and tho commander of tho Prince
ton that tho first hostile' act will
mean the execution of every Ameri
can and Briton imprisoned by him
for alleged fomenting of a revolu
tion, and that he will burn the el'y.
It is feared by Amorlcan residents
here that tho commandanto already
has sent his prisoners to death.
Valladares during tho night sup
erintended the mounting of guns on
the customs house to resist attempts
of American and British marines to
force a landing.
Tho foreigners at Amapnla have
barricaded their homos. The Brit
ish consul, who fled to Guatomala
City, declared that conditions at
Amapala border on anarchy.
SEARCHIN
FOR GREAT
GOLD CHAIN
MYTHICAL CHAIN OF GOLD SAID
TO HAVE 1IEEN DI8COVEHEI)
DY PIZAItnO ISEIN'Q BOUGHT
FOIl IIY TKEASUItE SEEKEHS
IN PEnU.
Victoria, B. C, Oct. 12. Seeking
a masalve gold chain lootod from tho
Indian temples of the sun worship
pers on tho Isle of the Sun, In tho
mountains of Doth la, many treasure
hunting expeditions are at work In
TRIKE
Colonist Travel Heavy,
1
Los Angoles, Cal., Oct. 12.
Colonist travel to Southern
California will bo heavier this
year than ever, nccording to
forecasts made by railroad ofll-
cials here.
Between 50,000 and CO, 000
fr homescckers from tho Etu t and
Mlifdlo West will arrive In Los
Angeles within tho next 30
days, according to these esti-
mates. Tho dally average of
colonists brought into Los An-
geles by tho Santa Fe durlnr;
tho last two weeks has been
above 1500.
Offlclals of tho Salt Lake and
the Southern Pacific passenger
departments havo given out
figures nearly as large.
tho Bolivian mountains, according to
news brought by tho four-masted
schooner Alumna, which reached Vic
toria late yesterday afternoon.
E. Brown, a young English railroad
engineer, who has been running a
line for tho highest railroad in tho
world, running from Antofagasta
Ferro Carllla to Lapaz, said:
"There have been many treasure
hunting expeditions in Bolivia this
year. An Italian count had returned
just beforo I left, and a, party of four
Americans were In the mountains.
The Americans had been gone three
months, and some anxiety was felt
for their safety, They had gone In
search of a massive gold chain, said to
be no less than 80 feet long with
monster links, said to havo been dis
covered by Pizarro, during tho days
when Spain was exploiting South
America."
o
MItS. HACHEIj I1HOOKS AGED
NEARLY 00, WHO CAME TO
OHEGON A SLAVE IN J81!l,
DIED AT HER HOME HEUE TO
DAY. Mrs. Itachaol Brooks, colored, died
at her homo on Miller streot, South
Salem, this morning, from a hemor
rhage of tho lungs. Tho remains wore
taken to tho Clough undertaking par
lors whero arrangements for tho fu
neral aro boing made. She was prob
ably tho last of the slavo women
brought to this part of Oregon, and
was a well-known character.
Mrs. Brooks came to Oregon with
tho Dolanoys In 1843 as a slavo girl,
She leaves two sons, Samuel and
Mansfield, both employes of the
Spaulding Logging Company, of this
city, and highly respected men. As
a slave she was tho property of Dan
iel Delaney, who brought his family
across tho plains to Tho Dalles, and
there shipped them down tho Colum
bia river in a wagon box, loavlng tho
toams and wheels of tho wagdns. The
slavo girl, Itachaol, was tho only ono
of tho slaves kept by the family. The
usual slavo auction was hold by De
laney when he left Tennessee, and all
were sold off lutt Itachaol, who was
the pet of tho family, and had been
bought by Mr. Delaney for $1000 In
gold. .She clalmod her froodom In
tho early sixties, and was married to
a colored roan by tho namo of Trave,
who died, and she became tho wlfo of
Mr. Brooks at Salem. Mrs. Brooks
lived to be nearly ninety yours of
age, and was a woman of great In
dustry and energy. She clalmod to
know whore treasure was burlod on
the Delaney homestead near Turner.
She was not at the homo when Mr.
Delaney was murdered by Baal and
Ilakor, January 8, 1805. She Is prob
ably the last of the slave women who
was brought to Oregon.
TIE
LY IS
FOOD SUPP
WILL SO
MORE
TO :
Last Night 42,000 More Railroad Employes Joined the 100,
000 Already Out, and Tonight at 6 O'clock 82,000 Employ
es of the Paris, Lyons & Mediterranean Road Will Join the
Strikers Many American Tourists in France Are" Unable to
Get Out, as All Trains Are Abandoned Troops Are Guard
ing Railroad Property.
,
300,000 to Go Out.
1
Paris, Oct. 12. Threo Uun-
drod thousand French railway
employes, in all tho affiliated
branches of tho transportation
servlco, voted this evening to
strike tomorrow night. At that
timo overy train In Franco and
every packet steamer and river
boat under the jurisdiction of
tho "syndicate," as tho French
unions nre called, will bo tied
up.
Tho government is preparing
to tako the strongest .repressive
measures, and hundreds of ar-
rests are Imminent, It Is intl-
mated privately that tho first
reservio soctlon will be called to
Ua pplnrs nt nightfall tomorrow,
"This is not a strike that tho
government faces," said Pro-
mlor Bryand tonight. "It Is a
criminal insurrection, and will
be treated as such. Wo havo
wnrnod the loaders to bo careful.
They havo not heeded our ad-
vice. They must swallow bad
medicine.
Paris, Oct. 12. Employes ot tho
Eastern railroad numbering 40,000
and of the Western numborlng
2,000 more jo'nod tho strlkors on tho
Northorn railway today, Eighty
GET ONE OF
BISHOP'S READY
TAILORED SUITS
$10 to $30
and your suit
over for the fall and winter
.-.it They are
Cut to fit
Shrunk to shape
Made to stay
Every suit guaranteed
Salem
Woolen
i
tlltHHtHtlltHM(HtilHltlltllllMHHttltllllll
SHO
RT AND
E EXHAUST
thousand .workers of tho Paris, Ly
ons and Mediterranean, the largest
road, in France, planned to walk out
at C o'clock tonight; tho Orleans
lino employes are expected momen
tarily to quit, nnd the Central rail
road workers will strike tomorrow.
By Friday not a wheel In Paris, It i
expected, will bo moving and overt
tho Paris underground and the omr
nibus tramway may bo tied up.
Clashes between strikers ami
troops began early today, Tho
strikers sot about disarranging tele
graph and telephone lines. Switches
were tampered with and two serious
wrecks wore roported.
Practically tho ontlro French ar
my Is under arms awaiting orders to
disporso the workers whenever they
grow turbulont.
Tho employes of the Western' lino
quit this morning wltoout warning.
Trains wcro nbi.ndcmed oni;i,he tracks
when tho strlko orders wero re
ceived. Boats' wero loft In the slips
or any convenient landing place. The
ontlro system was paralyzed.
Passengers sat about In tho trains
a few" minutes; then, when tho
strikers formed around the' trains,
sought rofugo . as beat, they' could.
Thousands ot American tourists aro
in Franco and cannot get out by tho
rogular channels.
Efforts on tho part of tho North
orn railway company to man their
trains with government onglnoors
nro meeting with but poor success.
(Continued from Pago 5.)
troubles are ::
' t
Mill Store ll
i
TONIGHT

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