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The courier. (Lincoln, Neb.) 1894-1903, April 07, 1894, Image 16

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99066033/1894-04-07/ed-1/seq-16/

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14
THE COURIER
night. There was a pleasing exhibition of Hopper's acrobatic com
edy, and the rollicking fun that always accompanies this comedian
was palpably in evidence, "Panjandrum" is a medley and a proper
enough vehicle for the exploitation of the glittering speciaties that
we expect when a Hopper or a Digby Bell is announced.
tem
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The week opened with "The Black Crook''
at the Lansing theatre. There was a fair
sized audience, and the stag corner was
particularly well tilled with such eminent
' patrons of the drama as Lieutenant Townley
and Tom Ewing and Frank C. Zehrung and
Mart Aitken and Frank Polk and Harry Krug
and Tom Cooke and Charley Magoon. This part
of the audience was very appreciative. Apart from the scenic effects
which were, in some instances, very striking, the main feature of the
entertainment was the dancing, or rather the leg performances of
Blanche Henshaw and four other energetic young women designated
on the program as the "French Quadrille Dancers from the Casino,
Paris, and of four juveniles. For nearly ten minutes the intelli
gent and discriminating audience was charmed with a bewildering
variety of splitB, given by well fastened together females ranging in
age from about six yedrs up. The split is one of the latest tributes
of the stage to the culture of the public. In provincial Lincoln we
do not often have the privilege of witnessing this elevating spec
tacle; but when we have the opportunity we are appreciative, and
we do not hesitate to manifest our approval. Surely it is a tine
.thing to see these young women dance in the middle of the stage
with one leg held straight up in the air, and then drop to the floor
with legs split and at right angles with the body. It is a decided
advance in the art of the theatre, One of the womon jumped high
in the air over three of her companions, and then landed on the floor
in a split position. Others walked up to the pillars next to the pri
vate boxes and elevating one leg is a perpendicular position laid it
along the pillar in a most edifying fashion. Then, as if to show the
audience that there was no false modesty about them they stood on
their heads and turned a summersault, with heels flying. All these
things were done first by a quartet of young women. They were "
followed by four little girls, probably from six to fourteen years of
age, and each feature was repeated in a very; able manner. There
was an Amazonian march led by a woman of aggressive shapeliness,
corypheens, Ta-ra-ra-ra boom-de-ay specialty, some smoothly work-.
ing scenery and glittering costumes. "The Black Crook was un
doubtedly a great success.
The contortionist exhibition in the '
bert ever seen in this city.
'The Black Crook" was the
It is only charitable to suppose that Marie Tempest was physically
indisposed Tuesday night when "The Fencing Master,' a pretty but
medicore opera, was produced, with handsome Bcenery, and an ex
cellently trained chorus. Miss Tempest has a winsome manner
and a husky voice. In the scene where as Francesco she breaks the
intelligence to Fortunio that she is a woman, she displayed real art.
This scene was a very effective incident in an opera that was often
dull. Some of the leading vocal work was notably well done, and
the inevitable comediasu made the audience laugh.
Lincoln theatre goers have been put to a pretty Bevere test this
week. Several very strong attractions have been presented all in a
bunch and in most instances there was an increase in the price of
tickets. But the attendance has averaged good, and the theatre
has made money.
The Lansing will be dam all of next week.
Four new boxes will be put in the Funke opera house. Designs
for a new drop curtain are now being prepared. It is expected that
the improvements and decorations will be completed some time in
June.
The Lincoln Light Infantry company will give a minstrel perform
ance at the Lansing theatre, April 17. The performers have been
rehearsing for months, and a very attractive program has been arranged.
The fact that a certain young lady a blonde is wearing a new
diamond ring is taken as a confirmation of what has been a more or
. less general surmise.
That .Lieutenant Pershing should have consented to lead the
Patriarchs' cotillion is a compliment on his part to that organiza
tion. The lieutenant, who possesses so many elements of social
popularity, has been very sparing in his favors to society, he having
elected to spend the major part of his time in study, in the face of
many invitations from the gay circle. He is an excellent dancer and
he led the cotillion Wednesday night with conspicuous success.
Boyd Putnam, a member of W. H. Crane's company, is a relative
of Mre. Putnam of this city, and was entertained at the Putnam
residence while in Lincoln. Mr. Putnam was Henry De" Buy ter in
"Brother John," a dissolute and unprincipled man of the world, and
he was dashing and clever.
There will be much regret at the departure of Mr. Lillibridge's
family for Chicago. Miss Lillibridge, particularly, has a host of
friends and admirers, and she will be much missed in social and
musical circles.
W. H. Crane and one of the best and most evenly balanced sup
porting companies seen in Lincoln this season presented "Brother
John" at the Lansing theatre Wednesday night. It was a notable
performance in every way. Mr. Crane had an excellent opportunity
to exploit his ability in real comedy, and he was assisted in a most
able manner by the company. "Brother John' is a very funny play,
but it is not up to the Crane Etandard.
The democratic party has enacted no law in the past fifty years
for which the country was not entitled to an apology. The party
itself is an apology and a mighty lame one at that.
The character of the men composing Caxey's army is not belliger
ent. Not a man in the lot, but during his long career as a profes
sional vagrant, has religiously avoided asking for alms at any house
where there was a saw-horse in sight or a stick of timber that might
be converted into stove wood.
"The Police Patrol," a sensational melodrama with realistic ef
fects, was produced at the Lansing theatre Thursday night, and was
received with vociferous manifestations of approval. It pleased a
good many people who doubtless would have found little enjoyment
in witnessing the other attractions which Manager Church has pre
sented this week. "
THE BONDS CARRIED.
The proposition to issue 9500,000 city refunding bonds, which was
voted on at Tuesday's election, was carried by a majority of 399.
De Wolf Hopper presented "Panjandrum at the Lansing last
The fact of Herpolsheimer & Co. selling for cash only enables them
to sell you good shoes that will fit for one-third less than usual prices.
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