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St. Helens mist. (St. Helens, Or.) 1913-1933, February 05, 1915, Image 4

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ST. HELENS. OREGON. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 5. 1915.
3
3
This Table, 42 inch
top, 6 feet extension
Fir - - $8.00
Pacific Oak 9.00
Genuine Oak 12.50
Other Dining Tables, any length and width,
from $5.00 up.
See the Dining Set in the window. &
Special this week $25.00. jp-
j FURNITURE E. A. ROSS UNDERTAKING
NOTHING ON EARTH
Makes you feel better than a
good, square meal. Meat is
three-fourths of the whole, and
we sell the best.
WHAT MORE CAN WE SAY?
CENTRAL MARKET
B. I. PLUMMER, Prop. .
ST. HELENS,
OREGON
Livery, Feed and Sale Stable
DRAYING AND TRANSFER
All Business Promptly Attended To
PHONE 15 OR i2
WM. H. DAVIES
ST. HELENS, OREGON
Prop.
SOME INTERESTING
WAR STORIES
Correspondent of tlie A. P.)
London, Jan. 23. ThPro aro cer
tain stock war sto.les which persist
in cropping up unilor new guises nt
regular intervals, and which find
wide credence among some clusses of
people who believe everything that Is
printed to the descrldlt of England's
enemies.
One of these stories is about a
German goveruess In whoso trunks
bombs were discovered wrapped In
cotton. N?ver has such a case been
reported, to the police, yet the story
bobs up time and again. Punch has
suggested tint It would be Interest
ing to gather her various employers
around the same table.
Another Is the postage stamp yarn.
In this, the writer, a British subject
detained In Germany, writes a rosy
letter to friend In England, tells how
he is in the camp and cal's his
friend's atter.tlon to the curious pos
tage stamp tffixed to tho letter.
The friend eoaks off the stamp and
finds written in a minute hand un
derneath, "Don't believe a word of
what I have written It Is all lies."
The latest version of this yarn comes
all the way from Nova Scotia.
The story of the Belgian Joker pre
tending to betray & grave military
secret to the German commander at
Ilrussela, who thereupon placed a
permanent guard at the aquarium,
has been bandied back and forth be
tween the British ana French papers
for two or three months. The Bel
gian's story was that tho pikes In the
aquarium had been trained to carry
messages down the river to Antwerp.
Only the other day a London after
noon daily paper printed the story as
translated from a provincial French
contempoiary. Statesman.
KC.UTOOSK.
iiitAkiAiiALlAtULiAtULlitllLUttULAAtULiALi
St. Helens Mill Co.
Electric Lighting
(Saves Your Eyes)
St earn Heating
(Prolongs Your Lives)
Santosh Tribe No. 42, Redmen,
and Mttlcoma Council No. 23, Degree
of Pocahontas, had a surprise on
Brother Bert West Saturday night,
the purpose of the surprise was to
present Brother West, the past
Sachem, with a great jewel, a token
of appreciation for the faithful per
formance of his duty tn advancing
Itedmenship during his term of
office.
A fine supper was Berved, Brother
Piatt serving the coffee in his usual
pleasant way . After supper Brother
Knglert, chief of records of Santosh
Tribe, gava them a fine talk; also
complimented the ladies of the Poca
hontas for the fine spread that was
served, which was well applauded;
acting ns a repiesentative of the
chief of the great council of Oregon,
he presented Brother West with the
Jewel, a few remarks from Brother
West, thanking thera for the honor,
when Brother Butler's voice rang out
"first couple on the floor names the
dance." Mr. Morris presided at the
piano. Mat Grewell the violin and
everybody danced until one o'clock.
Everybody went home thinking their
time well spent
WHAT TWO REST
DAYS A WEEK MEAN
Lath
Wood
Lumb
er
EUROPEAN PLAN . AMERICAN PLAN
EVERYTHING MODERN AT THE
ST. HELENS HOTEL
J. GEORGE, Proprietor ALL BUSSES CALL AT HOTEL
RATES $1.00 AND UP
SPECIAL RATES TO REGULAR BOARDERS
I
CHILDREN'S COATS
Mackinaws
FOR IADIES AND MEN
Caps and New Clothes
H. MORGUS & SON
"QUALITY, QUANTITY, PRICE."
Last summer, for the first tlmo. a
i few of the larger of New York City's
department stores yielded to the urg
Ings of the Consumers' League of
that city and closed their doors all
day Saturday throughout the hot
months. The half-day which they
had formerly claimed had profited
them little four hours or for four
and a half, on the dullest morning of
the week, when many of their
customers were out of town for
the week-end and the rest un
willing to shop In the morning
they could well afford to give
up the little trade that re
mained, and cut down the lighting
bill, and pther running expenses.
The innovation meant for some of
the stores a real saving. What did
It mean for their clerks? In re
sponse to Inquiries from outsiders
interested In the movement for Sat
urday holidays, says the New York
Evening Post, representatives of the
League visited the stores In question
and Interviewed many of the clerks,
with the following result:
Tho answer was uniformly ap
preciative and enthusiastic. One
clerk In the suit department of one
of the stores said the two days off a
week were "just like another week's
vacation."
"It certainly was a treat," declar
ed the clerk In the stationery de
partment of another store. " You
couldn't hope for tter hours than
that."
"It made the time go so quickly,"
said another saleswoman. Several
remarked upon how well find rAHto1
they felt.
A clerk of a Fifth Avenue firm
said: "You have no Idea what a dif
ference those two solid days off
make. I have been here six years,
and I never felt better able to begin
tho year's work than I do now."
One girl said that she could start
In tho day's work with a different
spirit when she knew that the hours
were not going to bo fatlgueing.
The time to herself" seemed to be
tho Important thing with her. "I
really enjoyed working this summer.
Tho tlmo passed so quickly, and I
folt so rested nnd unhurried," she
remarked. Another salesgirl assert
ed that the clerks as a whole felt
much hotter rested, and went on at
their work In a very different spirit.
This "different spirit" was quite
manifested in every girl Interviewed.
One girl In the wulst department
summed It up when she suld: "I'm
mighty lucky to bo working here.
You know. I feel now as If I would
stand by this house through any
thing. A store that treats Its clerks
as this Btore has In the past summer
deserves something In return, and 1
for one am going to give it the best
service I can. Those two days off
were lovely.'
In one store a salesgirl declared
that tho store had gained more than
it had lost, for little business was
done In the half-day during the sum
mer anyway, and for tho llttlo lost
in trade the store had gained much
In loyalty from the clerks and In
having the entlro force rested and
reudy to start work with enthus
iasm. Literary Digest.
SCIENTIFIC
MORAL SUASION
Alt children may perhaps be
roughly divided in to great cl-cses
the spanked and die unspanked.
Stmlllarly, most parents belong
oither to the class of spankers or to
those who depend upon tho spoken
word and tho reproachful eye. For
i long timo people have taken sides
-irliltrarlly on this matter. The
opinion of the child was not consult
ed, and his physical, mental, or psy
chological make-up was often left
out of consideration entirely. The
ulult p.-ejudico In the matter decid
ed it definitely and for all time. To
all this, tho Spokane Spokesman-Re
view avers, a change Is likely to
come:
With the object of ascertaining
what children think about right and
wrong, 3000 children whose ages
ranged from six to sixteen wero
asked what they would have done
in this supposed case.
"Jennie had a box of paints. While
her mother was out she painted the
i hairs to make them look nl:e for
Tama. But her mother took her
paints away nnd scut her to bod."
The replies full Into three main
classes. Tho youngest children In
proponderlng numbers reasoned that
Jennie had been naughty, had In
flicted Injury or sorrow upon her
mother, and should have pain or
(I .nui ko visited upon herself. C'hlld
on of Intermediate age argued that
tlio paints should bo taken from
J'nnie, bo withheld uutil sho knew
enough not to do more mischief with
'hcr.i, and that she bo warned not
to repeat the offense or be threaten
ed with penalty for doing so. The
oldest children urged that tho moth
er should have reasoned with Jennie
and have explained the uso of dif
ferent kinds of paints and tho prin
ciples cf Interior decorations.
The revealing of the spiritual
growth of childhood Is startlingly
suggestive, and the reversion of the
individual to the childhood of the
race Is not without significance. The
youngest, those in whom the mora)
instinct is awakening or aborning,
think predominantly In terms of re
venge or retribution. To tho more
developed child the prominent Idea
was the prevention of future wrong
dcing The most adranced children,
however, showed more concern for
Jennie's moral welfare than with
damago to property or punishment
for transgression. The suggestions
of theso children recognized Jennie's
good Intentions and symathlzed
with her ignorance and her need of
instruction and guidance.
The practical application of the
experiment appears to bo fairly ob
vious. The youngest children com
prehend tho logic of retaliation and
nay be punished for offenses
through penalties and privations.
Children cf ten to thirteen can be
handled through mothods that
should prevent repetition of wrong
doing. The oldest ch'ldrcn should
bo reasoned with. -Litorary Digest.
NKW8 OF TKKMfOI.M.
Mrs. Wm. Ketel and family are
visiting In Iloulton for severr.l days.
Mr. Eastman and Mr. T. W. Rob
inson, of Portland were Tronholm
visitors last week.
Mr. Clifford Bramble Is eujoying
a few days vacation on business and
Mr. Mclnlyro Is takine his nino
Mr. Guy McAllister and Francis
Coolidge attended the Yankton
dnnco Saturday night.
Miss Agnes Brown, of Happy Hol
low, spent Saturday and Sunday
with, frionds.
KPISCOPAL CHCKCII.
Thoio will be service In tho Epls
ccpal church next Sunday, February
7, at 7:30 p.m.
Al io tho Holy Communion will be
celebrated Mondny morning, Feb
ruary 8, r.t 9:30.
Universal Instinct for Play.
In providing for enjoyment the
Mmrrh uea one of the greatest moth-
ods by which human society bo de
veloped. Association is nover secure
until It Is pleasurable; In play tho In
ilnrtlva aversion of one person for
another Is overcome and the social
mood Is fostered. Play la the ouitf
educational aguuey iu rural commun
ities sud In the payday of human
childhood social sympathy and social
. -u...1 Aa Iniltvlilllmla
nauiiB in - ,
come together In social fathertnes, ,
their viewpoint la broadened, tnair
Ideals are lifted and Anally they con
stitute a cultured and refined society.
It Is pluln, therefore, that 'the
ehurch which aims at a perfect so
ciety roust use tn a refined and ex
alted way the essential factors tn
social evolution and must avail Itself
of the universal instinct for play.
I! the church surrounds Itself with
social functions which appeal to the
young sinoug Its membership, U will
fill a large part of the lumuntable
gap in rural pleasures and will reaa
the richest reuari by promoting a
higher and better type of manhood
and womanhood.
WANTKI) KltkKH
We will buy your ft.v
test satisfactory. or
Wrlto or phono. a0er ,3
Social Needs Imperative.
The average country boy and Itrl
have very little opportunity for real
enjoyment, and bave, as a rule, a
vague conception of the meaning of
pleasure and recreation. It Is lo fill
this void In the lives of country youth
that the rural church has risen to
the necessity of providing en Uriel q
ueut ss well as Instruction to I la
membership among the young. The
children and young ' people of the
church should meet whun religion Is
not even mentioned. It has been
found safost for tbum to meet fre
quently under the direction and care
of the church. To send them Into the
world with no social training expose
them to grave perils and to try to
keep thvm out of the world with no
social privileges Is sheer folly. There
la a social nature to both old and
young, but the , iclal requirements of
the young are Imperative. The church
must provide directly or Indirectly
sumo modern equivalent for the husk
ing ben, the quilting bee and the sing
ing schools of the old days In on
y or another the social Instincts
of our young people must have oppor
tunity for cxpreaslun, which may
Uke the form of clubs, parties, pic
nics or other forme of amusement
One thing Is certain, and that Is that
the church cannot take away the
dunce, the card party and the theater
unless It can offer In Its pise a sat
isfying substitute In the form of more
Dleaslug recreation.
XOTH'K TO (ilt.lNGKUS.
Pomona Grange will meet with
Yankton Grange February 6, 19 1G.
A good attendance Is dor Ired as there
will he speaking in the afternoon.
It. N. LOVELACE, Muster.
A FRESH SHAVE f
Adds tone to any
man. That's why
we are so busy and
there are so many
touy people in this
town.
IS Cents a Ton.
LYNCH & GIBBS,
Si. Htltnt, Orrgcn
0
eVi- A
j A .
7 w$&jfe
k3u r
Jim, Run
This Editorial
lorrow
Tom
THE law-abiding citizens
of this city wuut the
privilege of drinking
Leer the drink of True
Temperance. They are
weary of blind tigers speak
easit's, blind pigs, holes in
the wall - the off-springs of
prohibition.
Prohibition lias driven
away the material pros,
pentyof the people. It has
cutoff front this community
the revenue derived from
decent beer saloons and hug
Increased intemperance. It
lias largely increased public
expense in the vnin effort
tociiforce laws which can
not possibly be enforced.
It has added seriously to
the burden of taxation. It
has depreciated the value
of real estate. It has thrown
many out of work. It bat
discouraged investment
capital has learned to shun
prohibition localities.
wsnV,.1'" rT,I ,,nt W
crai ly 0f l.rr ai)1,
Qtn IDA T m
UU ill a hi)
Kates between
"Helens and Port. f
land, 50 cents
way, 75 cents f
uic roupd trip
. .vvi wju until Us;
Host l-evrs St. Ilrlrm 7 a, f
Uruirnli-K leaves Pi.ttl,B,l m
Arrive at St lleltuH 4jM
O lllOi
NO BITE,
NO STING.
ALL RIGHT?
SURE THING I
OVID
5CCIGA;
u.
t
PROFESSIONAL CA;
E. A. ROSS
FUNERAL DIRECTOR I
LICENSED tm
Bank Building St HtUf
Bummm Phora I) IU4w
DR. C. 15. WADE
PHYSICIAN AND SURGE:
most t
MackUBlig. iT.HtUh.
DR. W. R.DINHAM
DENTIST
Office in Bui Buid
St. Helens - 0rt
liourai Sun.Uy J M
9 to 12) I in S lv A'uisin'(
DIL A. C. TUCKEK
DENTIST f
ST. IIF.LF.NS, ORECOsf
Ul'( UlI SID& I
I
DR. L. GILPERTRC?
PHYSICIAN a, SURCt-i
Offlee Bank HhU-
St He
DR EDWIN ROSS
PHYSICIAN A SURGf!
orncs in bank Brum
IT-1
Ol. 11C1CU3 1 vj
T. S WHITE
FUNERAL DIRElK
MCKNHKl. miMAl.SH
Iloulton
0:
DR. ALFRED
PHYSICIAN A SUR0K
St.H
Hunk
UiiHdlnt
DR. hi. R. CLIFF
PHYSICIAN A SUROit
Phons kUIn l A WW
111a m imbuing Portland
Bull(n IOIU"'
GEORGE H. SHINN
attopney-atla
St. Helens 01
2
HERBERT W. WW
ATTORNEY-AT-LA
St. M.Una . 0r
M. E. MILLER
ATTORN EYAT-
Ore
AdwrtUemcnt
- I AAVJ

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