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St. Helens mist. (St. Helens, Or.) 1913-1933, June 16, 1916, Image 2

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ST. HELENS MIST. FRIDAY. JUNE 16. 1916
fovxoed tssi.
IsniuhI Every Friday liy
T1IK MIST I'l lU.ISIUXU COM1WXV.
S. 1,. MNHIIKAI Editor
S. C MOKTOX Business Manager
teutered as second-class mutter. January 10th,
1912, at the rostolliee at St. Helens, Oregon, under the
act of March 3rd, 1S79.
Sl'USCKll'TlOX KATES:
One Year $1.50
Six Mouths 75
Advertising rates made known on application.
COUNTY OFFICIAL PAPKK.
CHARLES E. HUGHES
The nomination of Charles K. Hughes as
the standard hearer of the Republican party
was strictlv in keeping with the demands of
the followers of that party from everv state
in the Union. While favorite sons had their
state following, this was largely compliment
ary and was not taken seriously by the con
vention. Judge Hughes was nominated on the third
ballot and received every vote except o6j,
and these were scattering.
On receipt of a telegram announcing, his
nomination. Judge Hughes immediately ten
dered his resignation from the supreme bench
anil accepted the nomination for president.
In a telegram ringing with denunciation of '
the administration's foreign policy, bristling
with genuine Americanism, which is hound
to meet a responsive chord in the heart of
every true American, he accepted the nomi
nation. The nomination of Judge Hughes by the
Republican party is. first of all. an expression
for a man of stainless character, high ability,
great poise, large experience and unques
tioned Americanism.
His letter of acceptance covers every issue
before our people today, and is worded in
such a way that every sentence teems with a
thorough knowledge ot the wants and de
mands of our country. The letter is a splen
did call to arms. It will send a thrill through
the nation. It rings with passionate sincerity
and radiates the power of aroused American
ism. Judge Hughes was born in Glenn Falls,
New York, and was 54 years old April 11.
His home at present is in Washington, D. C.
He served two terms as governor of his native
state. He was appointed associate justice of
the supreme court October 10. 1910.
The onlv criticism brought forward is that
the sanctity of the supreme bench should not
be invaded. This is very timely answered by
the ft .Hewing from the Oregonian :
Justice Hughes has conducted himself througnout
the 'pre-nomination campaign as becomes a judge;
lie has responded to the convention's action as befits
an American citizen. If the American people desire
an administration which will not fear to assert Amer
ican rights everywhere, to protect American citizens
at home and abroad, to uphold international law, to
defend national honor, to do national duty, to restore
national prosperity, to serve all interests and classes
alike, they will elect Hughes in November. They are
tired and ashamed of timidity, expediency, vacillation,
incompetency, extravagance, poverty and little Americanism.
tect its border is another thrust home. If Mr.
Wilson would not create a condition of order
in Mexico, he owed it to the people of the
border to protect them from disorder which
he countenanced, lie refused to use enough
troops to do this. The fact that there were
not enough troops for the service without
using the national guard did not suggest to
Mr. W ilson that he use his influence for an
adequate army. He would not help Mexico
to order. He would not use the national
guard to help the insutVicient forces of the
regular annv. He would not help make the
army sufficient.
Of these things he is reminded by the man
he made head of the de facto government in
Mexico, a man who remains as head onlv be
cause of the recognition Mr. Wilson gives
him.
With the reminders comes a threat. If the
interned expedition be not withdrawn at once
it will be attacked. Our government sent the
soldiers into Mexico on a fool's errand, known
bv everv military man to be a fool's errand
as soon as it was discovered how Washington
was taking orders from Mexico.
It is not doing anything in Mexico except
aggravating fool Mexicans who can be an
gered hv the presence of foreign troops. It
cannot be brought out because that would
create a political scandal at the worst possible
moment. It cannot go ahead. It cannot
come back. It has no mission. It may he at
tacked any dav.
A weak, wobbling and uncertain policy
could come to no other results. The Ameri
can government deserves to be reminded of
it by Carranza. We shall be in luck if the
expedition escapes with merely being foolish
and not being disastrous. Chicago Tribune.
THE PRESIDENT'S MEXICAN POLICY
President Wilson's Mexican policy, certain
only in its weakness, has exposed him to Car
rau.a's insolence and the country to danger.
Mr. Wilson is no match for the whiskered
Latin soul as a letter writer. The Latin is
the better man at this game, which evidently
is the only one Mr. Wilson knows.
Carranza in the latest communication of his
Latin sentiments to Washington has touched
Mr. Wilson neatly and adroitly on two sore
spots, lie referred to the .American expedi
tion as "interned in Chihuahua," and advised
Mr. Wilson that if he would reflect upon the
difficulties encountered by the American gov
ernment in protecting its frontiers he might
appreciate the difficulties the Mexicans met
in endeavoring to patrol their side of the line.
If there be any way of puncturing Mr. Wil
son's confidence in himself and in his love of
humanity, these thrusts may have reached the
quick.
The American expedition is interned in Chi
huahua. It is hedged in bv Mexican troops
and it is not stirring a foot. That fact is not
intended for American comprehension. The
American troops cannot be brought out until
after the national conventions have been held.
It would create too much scandal. The ad
ministration has tried to prepare the Ameri
can people to believe that the soldiers have
dune what they were sent in to do, that the
outlaw bandits have been scattered, and that
order is restored in Mexico.
Xo one has swallowed this. The expedition
went in to get Villa, and has not got him. So
long as that active organizer is at liberty order
is as far away as ever. "His bands inav have
scattered to avoid pursuit, but there is no law
in Mexico to prevent them reorganizing. And
the success with which they raided Columbus
and escaped will encourage another attempt.
The raid at Clenn Springs indicated this.
The reason the troops could not get Villa
was because Carranza would not permit them
to get him. He would not permit them to
receive supplies in the fashion which would
allow them to go ahead, and at Ptirral his
troops attacked the Americans, bringing their
movements to a halt. Since then, deserted by
the government in Washington which sent
them in, they have been "interned in Shihua
hua,'' as Carranza reminds Mr. Wilson.
This would be sufficiently humiliating to
a government which could feel humiliation,
The American government at the present mo
ment is beyond such emotion.
Carranza's statement that the United States
has suffered from raids because it cannot pro-
. ALL EYES ON AMERICA
Although we have had quarrels with both
.Germany and Great Mritain, growing out of
the war, and travelers have told us that both
belligerents hate us heartily, all eyes are upon
us. It is apparent that scarcely a speech is
made in the British parliament or a statement
issued in Germany without its effect on Amer
ica having been preconsidered. In many cases
the effect on America seems to be the chief
purpose. This has been strikingly illustrated
within the last few hours. Certain passages
from President Wilson's Charlotte speech
have been seized upon by the German press
as an indication that the president may again
tender his services as a mediator. The con
jecture is variously received, but the avidity
with which it is discussed shows the prevail
ing German interest in the attitude of Amer
ica. The various views, puld'utied with per
mission of the censor, may have a purpose.
In England there is no concealment of inter
est in America. Arthur Ponsonby has at
tacked the ministers for ignor ng the British
people and disregarding the British parlia
ment and then "adopting the American press
as a platform." Sir Edward Grey, while ad
mitting the departure from traditional eti
quette, defends it as a necessity because of the
practice of German statesmen in giving inter
views and statements to the American press.
Sir Edward was more successful in defending
the manner than the matter of his statements
for American consumption. Mr. Ponsonhv
argued that the government should announce
its definite peace conditions, since its general
izations have been twisted by German official
dom into threats of extermination of the
German people. Sir Edward's reply to the
effect that Germany is misleading its people
into believing the allies are beaten is un
worthy a statesman. It would indicate that
the allies are too proud to quit.. Some Ger
mans have the same weakness, for they argue
that they should not announce their real peace
terms lest the allies back out, thinking the
Germans are whipped.
Pride stands in the way of peace at present.
But the fact that both sides are making such
efforts to impress America is encouraging.
The greatest neutral nation stands ready to
help them to a mutual agreement whenever
they sav the word. Globe-Democrat.
Of course, when the farmer is visited bv
the free-trade candidate for office who will
ask him to vote for the "immortal principles
of free-trade." the candidate will take delight
in dispelling the frown that beclouds the in
quiring farmer's wife's brow with a satisfac
tory explanation of why our free-trade con
gress knocked off the duty of 5 cents a dozen
on eggs and allowed China in the year V)
to ship into this country six million dozen
stale, unwholesome hen fruit. Of course he
will not.
Roosevelt was nominated by the Progress
ive party for president, but declined to accept.
All that is necessary now to thoroughly unite
the Republican party is for Roosevelt to en
dorse the candidacy of Hughes. It is gen
erally believed that he will support 'the na
tional Republican ticket. He at least holds
the key to the situation. Should he take this
stand, the Progressive party will pass out of
existence.
fr nTniicTDiti urviKW
ItoBfhurg -County court ',,s
trad for lirldgn at Happy Yallc).
Donald co-opcrnllvo cheese factory
linmlliiiK about pounds f "illlt
per day.
linker llox sawmill of llecih
creek has been put In operation.
North llend City and county or
der niilo and a half Wuicuito paving.
Astoria - Quarry unci Towage Co.,
will erect large docks anil buildings.
Ophlr, Curry county milling dis
trict, to undergo large development.
Vale Warm Springs Irrigation
project will put water on 311,1100
acres.
Pendleton City council will deed
laud for site lor largo mausoleum.
lleppner Morrow county cream
ery doubles Its present capacity.
.Myrtle Point le.s $:!!, 0(10 paving
contract.
Oregon City llawley pulp and pa
per mills add $10,000 warehouse.
Donald 11. K. Hodges establishes
weekly newspaper and Job office.
Ilend Shcvlln-llixon Co. add large
box factory to sawmill plant here.
Mi-.rslU'ield votes J.'i.OOO bonds for
one small additional school building.
Stayton A. D. (lardtier will erect
a portable sawmill near city.
Kuterprise bank building to be re
modeled at cost of $ 13,000. i
Kugene Number of rural districts
will erect new school buildings.
Pendleton Northern Pacific plan
ning to build Into lloldniau hectic. 11
Another fool law has just been en
forced. A Coos county fanner wu.
urrcstoil and fined for doctoring his
own horse. That Is one of the fool
laws which, with others, makes the
state ridliulouu North llend Har
bor. Astoria S. P. S. rallnc.d puts
dining cars on its trains hero.
Huntington --Contract let for $10.
000 roundhouse here.
St. Johns Cooperage plant wilt
build two drykllns and bunkers.
(irants l'a-s sugar factory sold to
I'tah-lilaho Sugrr Co.
lireslium to luvj gas supply from
Portland Cas & C ko Co.
Ilased on the lr.st two years, for
each fiitallty to employer. In train
accident Including all Instances where
tin! accident was occasioned by mis- :
j take and carelessness of employes, a
j train was run more than ten mil-'
j ion miles. .
Salem to pet $:0,0U0 bread factory
I with $2,000 monthly payroll.
Albany Work of reconstruction ol
I'nlon furniture factory has begun.
Ilrookings Lumber company em
ploys 200 men und new lintel going !
up. j
Seaside Contract let for new I
school at $2:1,795. I
Oregon City llawley Paper mills;
go on three-shift plan, K-hnurs each.
I and employ BO additional men.
j Portland (Jus & Coke Company Is
I granted franchise to Sandy river.
Solo Farmers' I'nlon establishes
new cheese factory.
Ilandon expending $ 10,000 on wa
ter plant.
Increased demand for myrtlowond
products makes necessary sawmill at
! Drldge on Myrtle creek, Coos county.
i. P. N0RD1N
The .lewder 011 The Strand
Expert Watchmaker
and Jeweler
l u eh v repaired and made
In order.
i A Full Line of Watches,
& Clocks and Jewelry
PROFESSIONAL
CARD;
K. A. ROSS
FUNERAL DIIU.CTOR
LH-LNSI.D tMlUlu,
'i.ITt
Bank Building
BlUIIMU l'llOO 2)
St. 114
'". 0,,
i wM-PFUNDER's .1.
ft OREGON f
S7
oTl l lli;
m i l v. in-'
cam in 1 in .
IIIIIIIIIIIS
maii ve moi 1. 1,
Jl MI'I II.
WITH lll II I'll .
DR. C. WADH
PHYSICIAN AND sy
I'ltoxK mi
Uurkli lihlg.
sr. num.
For over 40 years
a valued remedy
for biliousness
and constipation
Sold mnd Rcormm'ndcti by
A. J. DEMING
ST. HELENS
DR. W. R.DINIIAM
. DENTIST
Oflic in Bk B,j,n
St. Helens
Ilinirn!
V 10 I.'; I to 5
Nim.!.iy 4h, (,,
bv A, - '"1
IU. A. C.TUckkk
DKNTIST
NT lin.l- NS, OklK.ON
Muim i nun,.
live stoke iv A i.ivi:
TOWN'
S. It. SONNEI.AMi, Prop.
FRESH & CURED FISH
POULTRY
llusliifh Plume IJ; lien, ( T'J
ST. HELENS MARKET
I reo I M It cry
DR. L. GILBERT RQ
PHYSICIAN IbUHum
St. Helm
nm, ii.nk 111,1.
DR EDWIN ROSS
PHYSICIAN . NUW.rON
omi-h in tusk 11 n,IUl
St. Helens 0,
T. S WHITE
hUNZKAl. DlliUIOR
i.irK.NKi. Minium
I loultoil
Ore
can
Ilrlek Ice cream every Saturday
and Sunday at Mason's Place your
order now.
m
DR. ALFRED J. PEEL
PHYSICIAN A .'UWJPON
MoMiiile
lluildliiK
HT. IIIKV,
DR. H. R. CLIFF
PHYSICIAN .i bUKUtOli
I'li oii- Main 4 CI A I "J. Cr. :
Wtland. l
III I 0, HIT ", IIIK
II 1 1 1 1 1 1 I M
Itring you uatrli to im r,,r evpcrl
li'lmirliiK
Complete Line of Jewelry
Novelties Silverware
SKH (II It LINK Ol' lM.TO
u Ann is
VON A. GRAY. Jeweler
GLEN P.. METSKER
ATToltNKV
llllleo ill IL.lik ItllililllK
St. Helens. Oro.
1'lionu IT
Ifc
Monuments I"?:"11!6,
and Marble
Having inailo arrangements
t WIIP.M Vnil tUAUT a t:"'1" J I'ortimiil nianu-
i. ' ' "nlu rt If I facturer
UUUU CIGAR
SAY SO
i
r i
I'.aiuN j
r i
The press of neutral countries and particu
larly those of the United States may bring
about peace in the great European war, and
it may be through their efforts that the first
foundation for peace will be laid. American
newspapers are scanned mighty close these
days in the war zone.
Only 5c at your dealer.
4 Save 25 SUX
S and receive a beautiful pic-
tine free of chartfc
if WVVVj
4
4
-i , louiiiHiones anil
monuments, I m prepared to
sell and aet up anything wanted
In tliiii line, fioni tho cheapest
In Urn best; ah;o lloweni for
funcrali'. (,n Klinrt notice.
T. H. Will i I.:
t lincrtiikrr and I Jiibalioer '
Hence Phono ll;i-2. orihe
I'honii f,4
M. . MILLER
ATTOHNIYAILAW
Si. Helens M
Moi:v TO I.OAV OS HSI
FA KM Mnl!T(iAiW
E. J. KOBERS0N
702 Title and Trust Bft
Portland. Oregon
lie
PANAMA RESTAURANT
Under new management
Mrs. E. S. Lampkin
Proprietress
If it is in the marget, we
serve it. Try our Special
SUNDAY DINNER
E. W. KRTEL
HI. Helens, .(,
Contractor-.-Bpilder
HIIMA'IKH, PLANS
Cement Work a Hpi.,ij
I'linno Comieelloii
Oregon took the initiative at the national
convention in the Hughes movement. Hon.
C. W. Fulton seconded the nomination of
Judge Hughes and the Oregon boys led in the
big noise.
Charles W. Fairbanks of Indiana, was nomi
nated for vice president on the first ballot.
Mr. Fairbanks held down that job under
.'loose veil, 1904-8.
Hotel Barber Shop
HKWITT UU0.
T. IlENNKTT, 1'ropr.
HAMTAIIV HIIOP is
II.
MOHT
HT. IIKMCNH
A KKAIi HIIOK HIIIXK
CHILDREN'S HAIR
CUTTING
A Hpciulty
Lynch & Tunzat
oh Ilia Klriiiul
SANITARY BARBER
SHOP
IVKItV ( I MTIIMI. U '
" ' iimi n;i
YOU'RE NEXT
iiki.uxh
PURB
MILK
AND
CREAM
Furni .l.cd Dally by
ST. HELENS DAIR
S. N. CADI', I'roprnto'
ST. HELENS, OREGON.
Phone 111?
Our f.iclllllwi I eili'll'""'1
f n b.lrv iirMlurt
million iin to supply
Cl-mlii .f mllb mill ITCIIIII. "K
lu mIi.Ii-iIv uiiiilljirv.
Wn ...... ,,vlilllM tl S"'""
moro customer im'l Vr"wi
Komi hcivIco.
Hutls'iii'Miiii
every rrupect.
Ktuiruiii
lew!
I 'IKK! FlltlC! VUlK
I'lllH
a... tx n.,1.1, ot 1loteni
, i.i the 0r1
insure your prupo'ij p
Klro Poller Association ','
vine, tlreRon. linn i A.e
Mchlitf W. U. WARUKN.

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