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St. Helens mist. (St. Helens, Or.) 1913-1933, May 04, 1917, Image 2

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Issued Every Friday by
THE MIST PUBLISHING COMPANY
3. C. MORTON. .Editor and Manager
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One Year f 1.60
Six Months 75
Entered as second-class matter,
January 10th, 1912, at the Postofflce
at St. Helens, Oregon, under the act
of March 3rd, 1879.
COCXTV OFFICIAL PAPER
"I pledge allegiance to my Flag,
and to the Republic for which it
stands, one Nation indivisible, with
Liberty and Justice tor All.
.NATIONWIDE PROHIBITION 1111
I NO THE WAR
Finely significant, ominously sig
ntneant, according to the point of
view, are tho several declarations of
the First Methodist Episcopal church
of Spokane, of the presbytery of cen
tral Washington, of Theodore Roose
velt and of tho United States Brew
ers' Association.
The Methodist church on Sunday
petitioned President Wilson to put
forth every effort to stop the manu
facture of intoxicating driuk during
the war and to close our saloons. The
presbytery at Kittitas urged the tem
perance forces of our state to request
the president and congress to abolish
permanently the sale and manufac
ture of liquors. Mr. Roosevelt advo
cates Immediate measures to limit the
quantity of grain which may be used
for distilling or brewing intoxicants
justly declaring that grain required
for food should not be diverted from
its proper use into alcoholic drink
The brewers' association sees the
hand of doom writing upon the wall
and through its general counsel be
gins to oppose the movement for the
conservation of grain.
The Roosevelt Idea that grain
needed for food should not at this
time of thrsntened shortage of food
be used for the manufacture of spirit
uous or malt liquors is the sound
policy to pursue during tho war. The
St. Louis conference on the American
situation as to foodstuffs had pre
viously suggested that closing Amer
ican breweries and distilleries would
effect great savings of food cereals.
President Waters of tho agricultural
college of Kansas affirmed that shut
ting down the distilleries and brew
eries would yearly savo us 6,000,000
bushels of wheat. Iu such times as
theso the saving of n single buchel
of grain to feed human beings and
our live stock is greatly to be de
sired.
Closure of tho manufactories of In
toxicating drinks during th3 war
would do even inoro than conserve
cereals for food. This economy would
be only a fraction, a little fraction,
of the economic gain to the country.
Immense waste in other ways would
also be eliminated. England has
found, for example, that the manu
facture of liquors takes enormous
amounts of much needed sugar.
Shutting the distilleries ami brew
eries of the United States until the
war shall have ended will be worth
millions to the people. Spokesman-
Roview.
PREPAREDNESS
Every day that passes emphasizes
more clearly tho great part American
industries must play in the protec
tion of our nation.
A modern army Is useless without
a highly developed system of trans
portation, power development, min
ing, manufacturing and farming be
hind it.
To reach the highest state of effi
ciency our industries must have the
help and co-operation of both state
and national government!!, for after
tho war is over, our struggle has
only begun, to retain the commer
cial prestige we have now attained.
Much legislation now hampering
our industries must be remedied and
regulations and restrictions which
tend to discourage American initia
tive must be corrected.
Military and Industrial prepared
ness must go hand in hand.
IllO BUSINESS WILL BACK XA
TION Is l true that money, the big men
who represent money, see In war op
portunity for gain? Let us take a
look at the facts. Within tho last
few months we havo had various pro
positions laid before our government.
Here are a few of them:
Henry Ford offered his plant, one
of the most wonderful In the world,
to the nation without profit. He also
offered his. entire fortune to the na
tion without Interest.
Charles M. Schwab offered the
Bethlehem steel plant, which has a
capacity greater than that of the
Krupps, to tho nation's service at any
price set by the government.
The copper producers of America
offered copper to tho government at
one-half the prlco It sells for today.
The zinc, the aluminum and other
producers are expected to follow the
example of the copper men.
The shipbuilders of America of
fered to cast aside all their rich pri
vate contracts and work for tho gov
ernment alone on a 10 per cent basis.
Willard, Ford, Coffin, Edison, Uos
euwald, llaruch, Schwab and a score
of other men of great wealth ami
great ability have placed their ser
vices n L the disposal of tho govern
ment. They have offered to the na
tion the love and service that no
money can buy. Richard Spillnne In
Commerce and Finance.
MILITARY PREPAREDNESS
Moving of heavy gun carriages,
and heavy loads of ammunitions and
army supplies, necessitates better
roads than at present are available
in Oregon.
Our state is exposed to attack; the
railroad facilities are not as well
adapted to carrying heavy guns as
are improved highways, and it Is up
to Oregon to get Its through trunk
roads In shape to facilitate the move
ment of supplies.
Should the railroad confers become
too congested, owing to war burdens,
or should they fall into tho hands of
an enemy, the through roads would
be the only means of communication
left to get supplies from place to
place in the interior. Farmers would
of necessity depend upon the through
roads for marketing their crops.
Every resident of Oregon will see the
necessity of the situation once this Is
called to his attention and will see
the bearing this has on the road
question to be voted upon June 4.
Tho Dalles Chronicle.
AS TO ADVERTISING
When concerns like the Pullman
company, the railroad and telegraph
companies spend thousands of dol
lars every week to acquaint the pub
lic more fully with their service
ambitions, it must be that they con
sider advertising as a profitable In
vestment, for it canuot bo said that
they have suddenly gone daft In a
desire to part with their money.
These large concerns realize the value
of advertising. Some concerns, how
ever, tliink of advertising as an ex
pense, donation or loss, but sucli
concerns grow fewer each year. With
consistent advertising little concerns
grow big and big concerns grow nig
ger.
ORKOON OETT1.VO STARTED
Some people in Oregon seem to
think that six millions is a big am
ount of money for good roads.
- Down in California, where they
have good roads and are willing to
spend good money for them, such a
sum would be considered paltry.
If all proposed county bond Issues
are carried, California will have ap
propriated 1101,000.000 for Im
proved highways by 1918. Of this
enormous sum $15,000,000 now Is
being expended in completing two
trunk state roads and laterals run
ning north and south.
If the California farmers were not
profiting by their having good roads,
they certainly would not be willing
to support such a tremendous road
progrum.
If Oregon Is to get out of the mire,
sho must build good roads. At last
Oregonluns have an opportunity to
make a good start.
There is no reason why the voters
should not approve the road bond
measure referred to them by the
legislature. McMlnnville . Telephone
Register.
The valuation of taxable property
In California has increased one bil
lion dollars during the past six years.
It is a signilcant fact that California
is known as the good roads state,
and moreover. It Is apparent that the
expenditure of some 150,000,000 on
hard surfaced roads in tho state has
been a great factor In developing the
state and Increasing the value of tax
able property. If Oregon will make
a real start toward huil.lini? mnA
roads, In the course of the next few-
years, the development of the coun
try will demonstrate the wisdom of
such action. A vote for ih rmt
bond issue will get tho ball to roll
ing. The election Is June 4, and the
voters of the state should heln "null
Oregon out of tho mud."
Anticipating the heavy demand
Unit the national crisis will make
upon the resources of the railroads.
the Southern Pacific Company has
placed an order for eleven additional
locomotives for delivery" this year in
time to assist in the heavy crop move
ment. None of the money to bo exnended ;
for good roads under the bonding act j
will bo expended in Multnomah coun
ty, ulthough that county pays 40 per
cent of the automobile licenses of the
stato and a proportionate share of
tho regular quarter-mill lax.
ST. HELENS MIST.
THE KID EXI.ISTS
Tho Kid has gone to tho Colors
And wo don't know whet to say
Tho Kid we havo loved end cuddled
Stepped out for tho Flag today.
Wo thought him a child, a baby
With never a caro at all.
Hut his country called him man-sir.
And tho Kid has h"ard the call.
Ho paused to watch tho recruiting.
Where, fired by the fife and drum,
lie bowed his head to Old dory
"And thought that It whispered:
"Come!"
Tho Kid, not being a slacker,
Stood forth with patriot-joy
1o add his name to tho roster
And God, wo'ro proud of the hoy!
The Kid has gone to the Colors
It seems but a little while
Since he drilled a school boy army
In a truly martial ntyle.
But now he's a man, a soldier,
And we lend him listening ear,
For his heart Is a heart all loyal,
Unscourged by the curse of fear.
Ills dad, when ho told him, hud
dered. His mother God bless her cried;
Yet, blest with a mother nature,
She wept with a mother prido.
Hut he whose old shoulders straight
ened Was granddad for memory ran
To years when he, too, a youngster,
Wus changed by the Flag to a man!
W. M. llershell in Indianapolis
News.
ST. HELENS BOY
WRITES OF NAVY LIFE
Is Receiving OihkI Training and (iet
ting "(iiMxl Eats."
The following is part of the let
ters received from George Prlngle.
Tho first one, written on April 19,
iays:
"Dear Mother and Father: Just
a few lines to let you know 1 am all
right and having a fine time, and we
are kept pretty busy. We have a tine
commander and If wo attend to busi
ness we will get tlong fine. Believe
me, I am going to attend to business.
Kenneth and I are in the same com
pany but not in the same tents, but
it isn't so bud as long as we are to
gether in the company. Don't know
just how long we will be on the ia
land but don't think it will he very
long. I saw one or two fellows 1
know."
Tho next one, written April 21,
says :
"As we have the afternoon off I
am going to write you a letter. We
Just got back from a long walk. Our
commander took us up on the top
of the island. It sure Is a great view,
you can see 'Frisco so plain, also
some of the battleships at anchor.
I still say our commander is a fine
fellow, and If one pays attention to
him he sure will make It all right.
You see, there are different camps.
As one company goes to sea the next
company moves to their camp. . I
think we will move to the lower camp
next Tuesday or Wednesday. It H
better down there. They 1iave movies
and other kinds of amusements. I
did some washing yesterday; so did
Bud (Kenneth). Washed some tow
els and hundkerchiefs. Believe mo,
they looked pretty good. You soak
them In hot water for a little while
then put them on the table and take
a scrub brush to them. All It takes
is a little hard labor that's nil. You
won't have to do any of my washing
when I come home. I will be a regu
lar washwoman. Well, I am going
on my first guard duty tonight It's
from 8 o'clock till 12. We are on
the radio watch, that's the wireless
station. There aro three men In each
tent, and one hundred men In our
:ompany. It's quite a class. War
ren Sonneland came up yesterday. I
didn't get to see hlrn till today. Dick
Brown, a boy from Houlton, is here,
too. That is all the fellows I know
besides the ones we came down with.
Wtf sure do have good eats here.
Nothing very fancy, but it sticks to
your ribs, and that la nil that i
necessary. We had hash on toast
for supper tonight and a piece of
cuke. Not so bad, eh? Hut, of course,
I would like a good piece of mother's
pie und cake that sticks to your ribs
too. They lust
iiufeiu iur
colors. That's when the flag goos
down it's at sunset. They do the
same in the morning at 6:30, when
they raise the flag that's getting up
pretty early. How is everybody? Tell
them all hello for me.
"Sunday afternoon. Will finish
this letter. Hud to clean up camn
this morning, and then wo went to
church. Had a good sneaker, tin
was from the army and navy Y. M
('. A. We sane some nf nnr ni,i
There sure was a bunch of us, about
three or four hundred. There are
four German ships here by the Island.
Undo Sam has them now. We had
a fine dinner today had Ice cream
for dessert. Some class, oh? George's
address Is Company C 2, U. S. Naval
Training Sta., San Francisco, Cal."
FRIDAY, MAY i.
- - - . . IAIN
bonds
A vote for tho good
road
., limn 4 will bo a vote to help p
mil
Oregon out of tho mud.
The City of John Day bus voted
$10,000 bonds for tho purpose of
constructing water system.
A fund of $100,000 bus
n.U'd In Oregon to Increase
been
crop
ai rouge and systematize the plant
lug of crops.
i PROFESSIONAL CARDS J
E. A. ROSS
l uneriil Plmtnr Enibuhner
Business Phono 23 Residence R-29
Bank llldg., St. Helens, Ore.
DR. C. E. WADE
Physician nud Surgeon
Phone 99
Muckle Bldg. St. Helens, Ore.
S. B. HOSKIN
IH'tlllst
Office in Bank Building
Helens, Oregon
St.
DR. L. GILBERT ROSS
I'll) Lil ian anil Snrgcim
Office In Bank llldg. St. Helens
DR. EDWIN ROSS
I'lijslrlan noil Surgeon I
Office in Bank Building
St. Helens, Oregon
DR. ALFRED J. PEEL
Physician and Surgeon
MaBonlc Building
, Helens, Oregon
St
DR. S. H. RUSSELL
Chiropractor
MRS. Rl'S-SEI.L, Ijiillra' Mawuse
Moorlleld Cuhinet Steam Baths
Hours 9 a. in. to 5 p. m.
Phono ASS St. Helens, Ore.
GLEN R. METSKER
Attorney
Office In Bank Building
Phone 17 St. IL-lens, Ore.
T. S. WHITE
I'mlertaker anil Funeral Dircrtor
County Coroner
Phone 54 lleslilonce phone 1 13-2
St. Helens, Oregon
E. S. SNELLING
Attorney at Imw
St. HcleriB.
Oregon
Money t 1,01,11 ,, i.'irNt Kami
MiiriKjigCH
E. J. ROBERSON
702 Title & Trust Bldg., Portland, Or
J. W. DAY
Attorney at Imw
Bank Bldg. St. Helens.
Ore.
FRED W. HERMAN
Attorney at Ijiw
Rainier, Oregon
LODGES !
i
The Loyal Order of Moose, St. llol-1
ens Lodge No. 1238. Meet tho tlrstj
and third Wednesday of each month.!
All visitors cordially Invited. j
HARRY BENNETT, Dictator '
W. W. BLAKESLEY, Sec. I
Mlzpah Chanter O. E S m,. ,
Masonic Hall the nernml ah rn...ih
Saturduys of each month.
MRS. LILLA M. CROUSE. W. M
JOHN PHILIP, Secy.
Tilllcum Tribe No. 52, Improved
O. It. M of Yankton, Ore., meets at
Its wigwam, second and fourth Sat
urdays of each month.'
W. a, BHANNON, C. of U
EBER BKOWN, Sach.
St. Helens Itebekah Lodge. No
217. meets first and third Thursday
of eacli month In I. O. O. P. Hall
Visiting members always welcome
MRS. ORA BENNETT N 0
MRS. ELLA ALLEN, Sec'y.' '
Columbia Encampment, No. 77
I. O. O. V. meets in the I. O. 6. F.'
Hall, on the second and fourth
Thursday of each month. Sojourn
ing Patriarchs most cordially Invited
to meet with us
HARRY BENNETT, C P
C. W. ULAKESLEY, Scribe.
St. Helens Lodge
No 117, I. O. O. F.
meets In the I O
n v i,,. i t.i i
the second and fourth Saturdays of
each month, visiting members are al
ways given a hearty welcome.
E. ADIN ROSS, Noblo Grand
( HAS. W. BLAKESLEY, Sec
Avon Lodge 'No. 62 Knights of
rythlas meets every Tuesday even
ng In Castle Hall, St. Helens. Vis
iting Knights always welcome
E- r- I'AWB, C. C.
REESE R. HALL, K. of R. & S.
St. Helens Lodge No. 32,
A. F. & a. M. meets 1st
and 3rd Saturday in each
Visiting brothers cordially
E. A. ROTO ER, W. M
E. E. QUICK, Secy.
month
In pnnture "' "'' c"" n,)l
readily bo plowed, the best prorcduro
!ls
lo apply Wlin, II IH'cni-il, im i"
........ !. tint critHti
to grow vigor-
ou:tly by a yearly ttipdri'wilng of well-
rolled In rnyiiril iimnuro nnu ocrn
.lomil Ugh! iipi'lleatloin of commer
cial rerllll.er Hint Is rich In phos
phates ami nitrogen. In addition, nil
i
thin spots In the nod should bo re-sivnli-d
each year with a liberal quan
tity of good grass seed.
proximately 20 per cent of each
potato pared by ordinary household
iiikiIiiwU la lost in the process. The
loss Includes much and vntnetliiie all
jef the portion of th" tuber coiitnln
I lilt! Important soluble suits. Pota
toes that am bolleil and baked In
! their skins lose practically none of
i their food value.
FOR FARM LOANS
SEE ME
I rvpi-mciit EiiNterti ciniipniili's
who I on n Money at
LOWEST INTEREST
RATES
anil mi Eiih)- Term.
I am agent for the
UNION CENTRAL LIFE IN.
Kl RAM E ft).
Mini the l'udlnu I Ire lusiiisiiie
ClIllipillliCN
HAROLD P. ROSS
THE INSURANCE MAN
Office with J. W. Day,
Building
Bank
J. W. Haggquist
Cleaning
Pressing
All work den,
CMC
t-clav
promptly
ana in tirst-uass
shape
Give mc a trial
Shcp in Hcwit Building,
next door to Hotel Barber
shop.
PERRY GRANITE CO.
Karl Terry, Mgr.
301 4th St. Portland. Ore.
Designers and Manufac
turers of Monuments.
Deal with us direct and
thus save agent's cuminis
sinn. I'm- f.t.nd 'ulk, always
the cheapest.
jST. HELENS-PORTIAND AUTO LINE
I'RANK KIICPAUli,
HCHEItl I.K
Prop.
t v a. ii i A M
l,v. St. Helens
Warren
Scappoose 8:00
Ar ''"rtland 9:20
''v- Portland 10 00
Ar St Helens 1 1 : Co
Satiirl,.ys and Sun,!,..-
P
M.
.10
1
1
2:00
3:20
4:00
5:C0
i S"dul lrl" 6 P
I Leave Portland
1 1 p m.
RELIABLE SERVICE
Rheumatism
,"URI0, '.ll0 fl"mIH IOT and
BMlllY remedy for IHIKUMATISM
( ontains no opiates or chemicals, ami
will not Injure the most dellcato
stomach or digestion. Results guar
anteed or money refunded. Price
$1.50 per outfit. For salo by
A. J. DEMING
Phone 1$
St. IleleiiN, Oregon
STEAMER EFIN
Portland, st. hki.kxs. astori
General freighting. Weekly service
Explosives a specialty. Leaves every
Tuesday at 12 o'clock noon
OAK HTRK.K.T IMX'K
Phono: Main 29C0
SLIIelons Landing, Sheldon Dock
Str. IB AID A
Rates between Ht. Helens anil
Portland, j0 CmUh one way, 7IJ
cents for the round trip.
Ticket Kood until used.
Boat leaven St. llcU-n. 7 rjv
ttelu.nl ii leaves P.-.th,,,,! 2:80 p' m
Arrive at St lle'rn. 4 -jr. ...
C I. HOOGHKIRK
Get Away from
RENT HABIT
rv,,n . .
. . u
ri r own lot and
your own home.
We have a hundred lotl
the most desirable locati
the city. 0cal,
Prices ranKe from $7Stoj;
These lots are sold or
terms: $10.00 down and Ik
to $10.00 per month 'S
Columbia Counh
L. R. Rutherfnrrl m.
St. Helens. OrI.,
! When You Want
Auk your grocer for
ST. HELEN'S IIKHT
tin lias It.
Hy Ti the B,t
Ht. Helens Co-operative CntA
ri-y AMiHintiiin
HI. Helens
M. HOVEN
Steamer RUTH
SAFE, SPEEDY SERVICE
TOWING. JOBBING
Passenger accomodations lc-
100
Landing at City Dock
LJnch & Muhr
HAIR CUTS. SHAVES
SHAMPOOS
Everything in the I'.arUtl
I .me dune up i Style
Our shop is Strictly Clean I
and Sanitary
Come in and See us
NT. IIKI.KNS
Hotel Barber Shop
HEWITT IU.IKI.
II. T. IIENXKTT, Pmnr.
MOST SANITARY SHOP IN
HT. HELENS
A REAL SIIOK hlll.NK
CHILDREN'S HAIR
CUTTING
A Hpcliilly
All Hunch Call at llnlel
CourttniiN Tri'iil.iii'.it
STOP AT
ORCADIA
HOTEL
THOH. iNHISTKIt, Prop.
( lib ki n Dinner Siinibi), -IK
RATEH $1.00 PI)R DAV ANDl'l'
Special Rule to Regular lloanlni
IAAAAAAAAAA'
STOP PAYING RENT!
OWN YOUR OWN HOME
We will build you a house
on small monthly pay
ments, at actual cost, and
to suit purchaser.
LET TlfE RENT
MONEY
you now !pay go towards
purchasing
your
own
home. See
D. T. Gerdes
St. Helens, Oregon

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