OCR Interpretation


The intelligencer. (Anderson, S.C.) 1915-1917, June 09, 1915, EXTRA, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010218505/1915-06-09/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

r
EXTRA ?hp Snte?tawtrer EXTRA
VOLUME H._ _ANDERSON, S. C. WEDNESDAY MORNING, JUNE 9, 1915. NUMBER 128.
UNABLE TO AGREE
WITH WILSON ON
NOTE TOGERMAN Y
RESIGNATION TAKES EFFECT WHEN NOTE
j IS DISPATCHED-WILSON ACCEPTS
I RESIGNATION WITH REGRET.
\ WILL CONTINUE SUPPORT OF WILSON
X BRYAN'S ACTION INDICATES THAT TERMS IF RESPONSE
TO GERMAN NOTE WILL FIRMLY REITERATE DE
MANDS MADE IN FORMER COMMUNICATION.
Washington, June 8.-William Jennings Bryan, secretary of state,
has resigned from the cabinet. Although formal announcement was
made late today that his resignation had been accepted, it became
known tonight that his resignation was arranged with President Wil
son yesterday. The cause is due to differences of opinion over th?
note about to be transmitted to Germany.
Mr. Bryan's action was the dramatic sequel to his disagreemeni
with the president over the government's policy toward Germany
After his resignation had been accepted the cabinet approved the re
spouse which had been prepared to Germany's reply to the Lusitania
note. Acting Secretary Robert Lansing will sign the document ant
tomorrow it will be cabled to Berlin. Bryan returns to private lif<
tomorrow, when his resignation takes effect, lt was learned he in
tends to continue his political support of the president.
The announcement created a sensation in Washington scarcely
paralleled in recent years. The fact that the staunchest peace advo
cate had retired has spread broadcast belief that the United States
C "policy as definitely determined, would assert and defend the rights o
the United States in any eventuality.
BRYAN'S LETTER TO PRESIDENT
Bryan's letter of resignation said:
lt is with sincere regret that I have reached the conclusion tha
I should return your commission of secretary of state ,with which yo
honored me at the beginning of your administration. Obedient t
your sense of duty and actuated by highest rflotives, you have pre
pared for transmission to the German government a note in whic
j l ean not join wit'.'out violating what I deem my obligation to m
country, and the issue involved is of such moment that to remain
member of the cabinet would be as unfair to you as it would be to th
cause which is nearest my heart, namely, the prevention of war.
. therefore respectfully tender my resignation, to take effect whe
he note is sent, unless you prefer an earlier hour.
"Alike desirous of reaching a peceful solution of the problems ari;
ing out of the use of submarines against merchantmen, we find ou
selves" differing irreconcilably as to the methods which should t
employed. It falls to your lot to speak officially for the nation;
y-\ consider it to be none the less my duty to endeavor as a private citize
kj, to promote the end which you have in view by means which you d
- not feel at liberty to use. In severing the intimate and pleasant r,
lati?ns which have existed between us during the past two years, pe
h mit .me to acknowledge the profound satisfaction which it has give
men to be associated with you in the important work which has con
?" before the ?tate department, and to thank you for the courtesies e:
BRtended. With heartiest good wishes for your personal welfare ar
for the success of your administration, 1 am, my dear Mr. Presider
f "Very truly yours,
< f 1 "W. J. 3ryan.""
PRESIDENT ACCEPTS RESIGNATION
President Wilson's letter to Mr. Bryan follows:
"I accept your resignation only beause you insist upon acceptant
and accept it with much more than deep regret, with a feeling
personal sorrow. Oui two years of close association have been d
Unable io A gree on Re
WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN.
Whoso? resignation as Secretary of Stale becomes effective simultaneously
v'th the despatching of the United States* secoud note to (ierman y on ques
tions involving the right of neutral ships ami passengers in the war zone.
Although he has severed his ofiicial connection with tin? government, Bryan
has announced his intention of supporting, as a private e)U.Ten, the efforts
of the administration to maintain the neutrality- of the United States.
Mr. bryan's resignation was arranged for at a conference he had with
the president Monday, but no intimation of it was had until the cabinet meet
ing yesterday nfternoon at G o'clock.
The resignation of the Secretary of State, the dispatches state, has caused
a profound sensution throughout Washington, the greatest that has been
felt there in years.
lightful to me. Our judgmentr accorded in practically every matter
of ofiicial duty and probable policy until now. S'our support of the
work and purposes of the admuvstration has been generous and loyal
beyond words. Your devotion to the duties of your great office and
your eagerness to take advantage of every great opportunity for serv
ice offered has been an example to the rest of us, and you have
earned our affectionate admiration and friendship. Oven now we
are not separated in the object we seek, but only in the method by
which we seek it. lt is for these reasons that my feeling about your
retirement from the secretaryship goes deeper than regret, and I sin
cerely deplore it.
"Our objects are the same and we ought to pursue them together.
1 yield.to your desire only because 1 must, and wish you God-speed in
parting. We shall continue to work for I' . same causes even when
we do not work in the same way."
LANSING ACTING SECRETARY
Washington, June 9.-Robert Lansing, counselor of the state de
partment, becomes secretary of state ad interim tomorrow. While
there is much gossip regarding the president's probable selection for
the secretaryship, it is the president's plan to make no immediate ap
pointment. lt is considered probable that the president will make
no cabinet shift, but will choose an outsider.
It is said in some quarters that Lansing may be retained as sec
retary of state.
SUFFRAGETTES THINK
PUBLIC IS MISINFORM EH
Conference Condemned Action of Mili*
Un ts Who Attempted to Force
Audience With Wilson.
Chicago, June 8.-The recent at
tempts of two militant suffragets to
force on interview with President
Wilson were condemned today by the
national American Women Suffrage
association conference.
Delegates from all. parts of the
country declared the votes are lest be
cause the -uniformed public, it was
?aid, credits militancy not to one or*
ganizatlon but to suffragists general
IT.
REAR ADMIRAL MAYO
APPOINTED VICE ADMIRAL
Washington, June 8.-Rear Admiral
Henry T. Maye, commander of the
firat division of the Atlantic fleet,
was designated today by the presldept
as vice adm I va I o fthe navy. He ls
the tirBt of three vice admirals to be
appointed.
Cruise to Frisco Abandoned.
Washington, June . 8.-Secretary
Daniels announced today that the
proposed cruise o', the Atlantic fleet
to San Francisco through ?he Pana*
ma Canal had been abandoned.
copyright by American Pres? Associatif?.
WOODROW WILSON
President Wilson's prompt acceptance of Hryan'a resignation ls regarded
as conclusive ?vident1*; of li IF* firm intention to uphold th? rights,'honor and
dignity of tho Tutted Stuten in Hie present international crisis.
NOTE IS COMPLETE;
WILL BE CABLED
TO GERMANY TODA Y
INSISTS ON OBSERVANCE OF NEUTRAL RIGHTS AND SAFE
GUARDING LIVES OF AMERICANS ON HIGH SEAS.
CABINET GIVES FINAL APPROVAL.
Washington, June 8. -The policy of
the United States toward Germany,
an insistance on the observance of
neutral rights and safeguarding the
lives of Americans on the high seas,
wa? determined finally today ut the.
cabinet discussion.
Bryan's resignation wan accepted
when the cabinet convened. Tnt dote
which will bo sent to (iernuiny tomor
row waa read for the Inst time to the
cabinet by President Wilson. Sug
gestions of come minor changea ?ere
noted by the president.
While no inkling regarding the con
tents of the note was divulged, it ls
understood an unfavorable reply will
mean the severance of diplomatic ie
lations with Germany, and that at
tacks on Americans thereafter might
lead to even graver complications.
Foreign diplomats Interpreted the
withdrawal of Bryan as significant of
! a forceful course hv the 1'nlted Staten,
j Many of them cabled -their govern
j ments In cipher of the cabinet change
and its significance.
Washington. June 8.-After two
hours discussion of the not?, to
Germany nt a cabinet meeting today,
Secretary Tumulty, at the direction
of President Wilson made this an
nouncement:
"The not? was gone over and dis
cussed and nut in final form. It prob
ably will go io? ward to Berlin to
morrow."
-Cabinet members uniformly refused
to discuss the rejoinder which bas to
do the situation resulting from the
sinking of the Lusitania.
It was learned definitely, however,
that only a f?V slight changes in the
note's phrasology were made at the
cabinet meeting. The note was taken
up in the form to which it had been
reduced after Secretary' Bryan spent
sevjeral hours on it following a con
f?renco with the president.
After the cabinet meetingj ecre
lary Bryan went to lunch with the
other members. It was declared that
while possible a few words might be
changed, the note will go forward to
Berlin in practically the form as
agreed on at today's meeting.
New \ote Friendly In Tone.
Tie friendly character of the pres
ident's note is emphasized at the start
by an expression of appreciation for
the offer of Germany to make ade
quate apology and compensation for
the killing of an American citlien on
tho British ship Falaba. and for sub
marine and air attacks respectively
on the American ships Qulfllght and
Cushln.k, struck by "mistake," accord
ing to Herr von Jsgow's first reply
to President Wilson's earlier note of
protest.
Perhans the most positive statement
that will confront th? German minis
try, when the president's second note
ls placed before lt, is the emphatic
rejection of the suggestion that the
controversy between the twp govern
ments over the sinklog of the Lusi
tania, and the attack on the Ameri
can ?hips, be referred to an inter
national commission of inquiry, pur
suant to title 3 of The Hague Con
vention of Oct. 6, 1?07.
The position of the American gov
ernment is that, until Germany com
pilas wlthv the^tber ternXB^of The
(CONTINUED ?N P>C? ?X)
IC
-:-r i fii ? II , u?
BATTLE
IN GALICIA
UHDE
AUSTRO GERMAN FORCES.
CROSS DNIESTER AND
ASSUME OFFENSIVE
FURTHER SOUTH
CENSORS GUARD
NEWS FROM ITALY
Big BattU Along Isoxa River Ap
pear? Imminent-Italien Cav
Pier ces Au i trian Linc?.
London, Juno 8.-The bl? batt)? In
Galicia has reached ito daclstpn. Th?.
Austro-German have crossed the
Dniester river, south of Lemberg and
havo assumed the offensive furttar
south. According to Austrian official
reports they have pushed th? Rus
sians back. This operation **a,Rec
"esfc?ry before tho Austrians and Ger
mans continued tba?"~?d vance toward
Lemberg.
Fighting north of A^tJjfesfiQptlnuss.
Operations on the Ittla-jUHtan fron
tiers is screened by ^censorship, but
t .ore are indications that' abig battle
ls imminent, ir not already begun,
along the ' J so azo river, where th?
Italians Jjave apparently decided to
launch $?lr principal attack.
? I tatiania valry has crossed the riv
er, Geneva reported today that they
had pierced the Austrian line.
U is reported the allies havo again
taken the offnsiv ia Oalllpoll pnlnsu
la, dfeating the Turks.
German submarines continue their *
activities, ?slnkjlng three Norwegian
vessels yesterday.
London, June a.'->;rttta4}y the
entire western tine of battle 'In the
European conflict, except for those
portions held by the Belgian? ' and
British, has been the scene of What
would appear-to be .a aeries of of
ensivo movements initiated by the
French.
In the region of Arras the French
have extended their attack! area,
while they are pressing; along the
front from the angle, of the Alane
and Oise in a northerly direction a?
far aa the British positions near La
Bassee, where the British forces ara
lying apparently quiescent.
For the past three weeks the French
have been advancing slowly, but
steadily in the country Immediately
north of Arras. Here they will meet
determined resistance from a formid
able German work known as "the
Labyrinth," part of which, however,
ls now in their control. The French
have been taking many prisoners.
At Hebuterne they have taken some
400; at Sclssons 250.
Desperate Geiman attacks, accord
ing to French reports, have been
made without success and great
loss to the attackers. German .-offi
cial announcements make but brief
reference to events on the western
front, merely recording the repulse
of France Attacks.
On the eastern battlefront the Rus
sians claim to have pushed their of
fensive movement across Pruth river
near Kolomea, while Petrograd has
admitted the advance of the Austro- '
Germans across the Dniester liver in
Galicia. The river Dubysa has chang
ed fitv* times In one day, with the
Russians finally In possession.
lsonzo river is the scene of most
of the important Italian advance ta
Austrian territory. There ha? been
little news in regard to this Italian
movement, other than the official ad
mission at Vienna that the tXalians
appear to be advancing against lson
zo in strong force.
Hungary bi experiencing a political
crisis similar to that which has Just
come to an end In England. Al
though opposition leaders have ex
pressed their assent, controversies
which antedate the War thus far
'have presented the formation; ot a
condition cabinet.
r- ?
Cologne, Germany) . June 8.
Chances that Bulgaria and Rumania
will jenter the war ca thaaldeot th?
(COWINUEDTW PAGE 3!X). \i

xml | txt