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Goodwin's weekly : a thinking paper for thinking people. [volume] (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1902-1929, July 19, 1902, Image 1

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Goodwin's Weekly. I
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VmTl SALT LAKE OITY, UTAH, JULY 19, 1902. No. 10. ',i 1
i I if ,
C. C. GOODWIN, Editor.
j. T. GOODWIN, - - - - Manager.
PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY.
Subscription Price j g Ygar j in Advance.
ddrcss all communications to Goodwin's Weekly,
P. 0. Boxes 1074 and 1020,
H 320322 Dooly Block, Salt Lakh City, Utah.
I DURING THE MEETING OF THE GRAND
I LODGE OF ELKS IN THIS CITY, IN AUGUST,
I WE WILL PUBLISH A BEAUTIFUL SOUVENIR
EDITION OF GOODWIN'S WEEKLY. THE
I EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE B. P. 0. E.,
85, HAS GIVEN ITS SANCTION TO THIS PA
I PER TO PUBLISH THE OFFICIAL SOUVENIR,
I AND WE PROPOSE TO PUBLISH A HANDSOME
PAPER, WITH COVER IN PURPLE, AND WILL
CONTAIN SPECIAL ARTICLES ON THE CITY,
B STATE AND THE ELK LODGES. ILLUSTRATED
B THROUGHOUT WITH HALF-TONES, BESIDES
THE PROGRAMMES FOR THE WEEK, STORIES,
I VERSES, AND OTHER REGULAR FEATURES
B OF THE PAPER. SEND YOUR ORDERS TO
BOX 1074.
SMASH THE MACHINE.
H Preparations are being: made already for the
election this coming autumn. The Republicans
H are handicapped in advance, because there is a
H feeling which is as universal as it is natural that
H there is a purpose on the part of a machine to run
H this coming election in the interest of, not the
H State, but of a few men. Republicans also labor
H under the reflection of the fact that the Republi
H can Senator, who was not the choice of one man
B in one hundred in the State, who bought his com-
: B ra'ssion, or had it bought from the then President
; B of the Mormon church, is the main lever of this
I B machine which is about to start its wheels in. the
B Merest of some of Senator Kearn's tools and
B favorItea Every self-respecting Republican will
B flght that programme. The old-time Liberal Re-
B publicans of Utah made the most splendid fight
; B ever made in this country for a principle. It lasted
B TOre than thirty years. It was waged, not in hate,
: B not in malice, but .with the determination if pos-
B sible, to make of Utah an American State. It
: B ended in the spectacle presented by the purchase
; B from the head of the Mormon church of a Senator-
: B ship for a man who" knows nothing of the spirit
; B or Benius of our Government, and whose qualifica-
j B lons for the great office had never been discovered.
; H If to this man's will, the Gentile Republicans bow
: H this year it will be a reproach to the splendid rec-
; B ord they made during the years when the fight
H offered only as rewards, disappointment and loss,
: B and will prove that, after all, they were not fight-
j B InB for a holy principle, but for such camp spoils
: B might fall into their hands after the battle
B should be won.
1 E
; B Again, Mormon Republicans cannot afford to for-
H Set that when a truce was called in the old conflict
; H and a treaty of peace was framed, one of the stipu
lations of that treaty which the chiefs of the
church signed, was that thenceforth they would
cease to give political dictation to their people;
that Church and State should be permanently
separated until "He who has a right to rule shall
come." They know that this covenant was shame
lessly broken when the Senatorship was sold to
Thomas Kearns, and if now they bend to follow in
the wake of the Kearns machine they will simply
advertise that they endorse the shame of his elec
tion and approve of the breaking of the covenant
through which Statehood was obtained and through
the breaking of which the Kearns election was
bought.
This is the situation which faces the Republicans
of Utah, and the question is what are they goingto
do about it?
Is any of the old blood left in their arteries; any
of the old sterling stuff left in their souls? Who
is to control their conventions this year; what
pledges are they going to exact from their candi
dates? We tell them that party ties rest very lightly on
men now, and that their only hope for victory lies
in smashing the vulgar, brutal machine.
New York city has been ruled most of the time
for sixty years by an organization headed gen
erally by a rich, ignorant and unscrupulous boss.
It has been, a frightful reproach to the city, it has
cost it the wealth of an empire.
An organization of that kind must not be fast
ened upon Salt Lake City, hence the men in charge
of city affairs must be looked to. There have been
painful symptoms of late that some of the city
offices looked to the machine for directions, while
others have shown plainly enough that a request
from the head of the dominant church was far
more binding upon them than their oath of office.
This means boss rule of the most odious kind.
When superstition and coin, make a combine to
control a people the outlook is as humiliating as it
is discouraginc
There is dangor that some of the city offices will
be used as recruiting stations for the machine this
year and this danger earnest Republicans should
take measures to thwart. A square deal is all that
will satisfy Republicans.
"When the managers of the two morning papers
took a pleasure trip together on the Uintah res
ervation; did they get a hunch from their owner,
T. Kearns, or were they merely locating trout?
THE LESSON OF THE BANK ROBBERY.
One of the first decrees entered upon the
ledger of the ages regarding man was that he must
earn his bread by the sweat of his face. That de
cree has never been revoked. Many a man tries
to evade it, some seem to succeed, but the rule
holds good. A striking object lesson has been sup
plied to the people of this city recently of what
follows when that decree is defied.
Two men in the prime of life, when life must
have been most sweet to them, decided to use what
they had not earned. It seems they were not dis
covered for ten years. Suppose they never had
been, how would it have been with them? For ten
years each went to bed every night with the
knowledge burning deeper and deeper into his soul
that ho was a thief. Does any one think they did
not suffer? Every day with them was a day of
apprehension lest they be discovered, and the
nights to them were so filled with accusing spec
tors, that the silence and darkness became terrors
J, It MltiM
to them. They took the money that they might l'
the more generously minister to their own base f Mtm
passions and appetites. Those appetites and pas- ' I j,1B
sions at last became their oniy refuge. They were iff 1 fl
sinking lower and lower long before their crime t( I'w'ltH
was discover,-. It was as though their own souls 'F J fplj
felt the taint and were dragging them down to '!
the level where they belonged. Without self-re- '' 4'il
spect, and in constant fear they walked the earth. j? M 1 !fl
The faces of friends who trusted in them became H v m
a torture to their eyes at last, until we can im- t S , I
agine that when the prison with its infamy opened I j it
its gloomy doors to them, a sense of relief came to ) fl
them after the strain of years that had been upon ' ifl
tliem HkSjB
The slave working in chains is happier than ill nlPfl
they could have been. His toil may be pitiless, jiln!j
his comforts few, his reward nothing, but at night PrflB
the stars come and bend above him, in thought he y$ i$B
can see the ladder that is being let down nearer. f' "'$B
and nearer to him, and ho dreams of the time when v lB
it will be within reach and when his soul will j j JM
mount upon it to a sphere where the chains are ifMljjB
all broken and the freed soul finds peace. Is there w$ ifl
any slave that these two men would not be glad f ' iHl
to exchange places with? . "JU f (H
At the same time we must not forget that njj f"
perhaps we are all a little to blame for the short- "JM sfB
comings of these men. We see all around us men ' , jjB
who are striving 'to evade that old first decree. m ! 9
They are intent upon obtaining more than their 1HIHM
rightful share of the world's wealth. They are Infl
careful to fight shy of the penitentiary, but they H
do not scruple to sink to any deception, to debase I '; iH
their manhood; to break their solemn agreements J ? Lfl
when they can do so at a profit, and when they j"' A1H
succeed and accumulate fortunes, we, none of us, f ; B
question them as to the torturous path they have $ jIH
traversed to obtain it. - !j ' f
But even these do not evade the old inviolable? 1 H
law without paying the penalty. When men' jljj .
smother their generous instincts long enough,' Hp. '1B
those instincts wither and die in their breasts. j riH
The old high purposes no longer thrill them. . f
Their heart beats become as metallic as the ring ' a i M
of a twenty-dollar piece, and when they go to their f lB
own hearts for comfort, they know that all their ' M!B
better 3elves have, by their own acts, been shriv- if 1-B
eled within them and the memories which they , I't M
once thought would be their comfort in old age, ' M
are but the scoria of a life burned out in the fires ' W fj
of base desires. i'!il!B
All this should teach the young men of Utah iT'r)B
the inexorable truth, that no man can wrong his ' !? f B
fellow-man without himself paying the penalty.' t M
The criminal may be able to evade an account- " Mi
ing with the outside world, but he cannot get i H
away from himself, and a fortune the foundation ; i
of which lies on murdered self-respect, on broken $ !'
promises, on deception, on falsehood and faith be- jIL J
trayed, may surround a man with every material Wj f,gq
comfort, may bring him power and purchased JU MA
honors, but it cannot bring back to him the things J ! !
which once were his and without which life is a lflB
mockery and fraud. 1 iB
The great industries of our country claim more ralB
sacrifices of life annually than would a good-sized fflwHH
war. In the mines, the manufacturies, on the nllBB
ships, on the railroads, by land, by river, by lake, fllifl
by ocean, everywhere the assessment on human BiflH
life is very great. Every day the dead 'are ached- lnlffl
uled, but the work must go on though BiilBfl
"The air is full of farewells to the dying, jH-HB
And mournings for the dead." BBflH

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