OCR Interpretation


Goodwin's weekly : a thinking paper for thinking people. [volume] (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1902-1929, July 26, 1902, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010218519/1902-07-26/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

9
G o o d w i n's We e k 1 y .
hi-- X H
Vol. I. - SALT LAJKILGITY, TTEAH, JULY 26, 1902. No. 11. t I
. . f ' ' ,i.
C. C. GOODWIN, Editor.
j. T. GOODWIN, - - - - Manager.
PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY.
Subscription Price j ? Year J in AdvanCGf
ddress all communications to Goodwin's Weekly,
P. O. Boxes 1074 and 1020,
320322 Dooly Block, - - Salt Lake City, Utah.
DURING THE MEETING OF THE GRAND
LODGE OF ELKS IN THIS CITY, IN AUGUST,
WE WILL PUBLISH A BEAUTIFUL SOUVENIR
EDITION OF GOODWIN'S WEEKLY. THE
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE B. P. 0. E.,
85, HAS GIVEN ITS SANCTION TO THIS PA
PER TO PUBLISH THE OFFICIAL SOUVENIR,
AND WE PROPOSE TO PUBLISH A HANDSOME
PAPER, WITH COVER IN PURPLE, AND WILL
CONTAIN SPECIAL ARTICLES ON THE CITY,
STATE AND THE ELK LODGES. ILLUSTRATED
THROUGHOUT WITH HALF-TONES, BESIDES
THE PROGRAMMES FOR THE WEEK, STORIES,
VERSES, AND OTHER REGULAR FEATURES
OP THE PAPER. SEND YOUR ORDERS TO
BOX 1074.
A RIGHT DECISION -THE HILT0N-ROYLANCE CASE.
The decision of the Hilton-Roylance case by the
Supreme court, it seems to us, is the only one that
could have been made under the law. The parties
under the rites of the church to which they be
longed were united by a covenant called sealing.
It is explained that this was merely a spiritual
adjustment intended to give the lady a certainty of
possessing a husband in the world to come. But
evidently this was distrusted even at the time, be
cause a church divorce was resorted to to break the
tie. The proceedings for divorce were a full
acknowledgment of the marriage. The laws pre
scribe but one way through which a divorce can
be obtained and this way was not resorted to. But
there is much more to this matter. The Mormons
proceed under a so-called prophecy which to them
is a real prophecy. When that is examined we dis
cover that the prophecy makes sealing a marriage
for time and eternity, and pronounces fearful pen
alties against all who would change its expressed
command in the least. It is clear that this was
perfectly understood by the parties at the time,
else no form of divorce would have been resorted
to. Again, there can be no other understanding of
the ceremony, for construed as it was sought to
bo construed, there could be no possible legal check
on wholesale polygamy under the name of sealing,
ft is clear that the man and woman who were
Principals in this matter were absolutely married.
Tho ofilciatlng priest had power to perform the
ceremony, the form followed was the accepted one
in the church. Nothing more would have been
necessary had they began and continued to live to
B gether. That they never did does not alter in the
j least the legal status of their relations.
H The truth is they were married and never di-
vorced. To aeny the marriage is to fly in the face
of the prophecy of Joseph Smith, and the expound
ing of the prophecy by all the distinguished suc
cessors of Joseph Smith in the Presidency of the
church. Being married, they were never by any
legal process, by any process accepted by the law,
divorced. And there you are.
The News says that in order to reach its con
clusions the court had to go outside the record of
the case.
That is true. The court was called upon to pass
upon the validity of a marriage that was solemn
ized when Utah was practically under eccleastical
rule. The court naturally had to investigate what
made a valid marriage at that time.
The News tells of "numerous cases of sealing in
which the parties were united for time only." Has
that been where both the man and woman were
Mormons? If so, by what authority was the mar
riage revelation as given by Joseph Smith set
aside?
Again, the News says, "a sealing may be for
eternity and not for time; that this is a matter
which is not explained in church meetings and
with which courts have nothing to do."
That may be true, but the case in hand was so
manifest that the parties sought a divorce. The
fact of their seeking a divorce was prima facia
evidence that they believed they were husband and
wife.
The argument of the News that there is nothing
in the certificate given by the minister who per
formed the ceremony "that settles the question
as to the scope of the ceremony." That wa3 why
the court went to the books of the Mormon creed
to ascertain just what scope such a sealing had.
Again the News says: "The President of the
Church neve issued such documents (a certificate
of divorce) in the case of a legal wife unless it
has first been passed upon by a civil court." That
may be true now, but how was it when this di
vorce was granted? Is it not true that divorces
were given with as little ceremony as the old
Israelites employed when they gave their wives a
writing that they were tired of them?
It is one of the painful reminders of what trans
pired in Utah when the power that ruled hero
defied the power of the sovereignity of our Repub
lic. It may be unpleasant and uncomfortable to
have such things sprung at this date, but the law
is law.
It is good to celebrate Pioneer day. The miracles
wrought in Utah since the coming of the first band
do not in the least diminish their place in history,
rather their memories take on more and more ma
jestic proportions. They faced the wilderness, the
desert, a poverty that was heart-breaking, priva
tions that were appalling, hardships that were
hard to bear, yet they faltered not, but every day
held a praise service and ploddingly, and apparent
ly unconscious of the splendor of their work, laid
the rude foundation of a state. Their coming was
an epoch in Utah, the anniversaries of the day
of their arrival cannot be too much celebrated.
The wires report that Judge Thomas P. Hawley
of the United States court at Carson, Nov., will re
tire from the Bench and become a candidate for
United States Senator. He has been 30 years on
the bench, eighteen as Supreme court judge of Ne
vada, and twelve as United States judge.
Judge Hawley belong to "the tribe of God Al
mighty's gentlemen."
, H
JOHN W. MACKAY. !
If there is a young miner in Utah with good H H
health, strong arms and a clear brain, let such an m " fl
one take courage. He has as much capital' as i'J fl
John W. Mackay had 42 years ago. If he says , i tj, ? H
to himself: "I was born without a name that is ill I
known among men, without one influential friend, M , ' H
without money," let him still take courage, he has l; ' ll
as much to start in life with as had Mr. Mackay. jf H
If with it he has the courage, the resolution, the 1 1 L H
fortitude, the high purposes which from the first Ifjjn r 'H
were Mr. Mackay's, and if he, like Mr. Mackay, be- jp ' H
lieves that the decree which made toil imperative Ili.. vfl
upon men was just and merciful, he will succeed. jN 'I
He may not accumulate as many millions as the Hi k fl
great financier did, but there will, as his soul takes j I f4 ' fl
its flight, come streaming back the same clear light ! , 'H
that reflects in everlasting whiteness the character I j $H
of John Mackay. m . fl
If misfortune pursues him up to middle age, let, , ; ''..H
him not despair. Forty-two years ago when the ) H
winds were howling around Mount Davidson, when iff, I ' fl
it was bitterly cold and there was not one comfort jl ( fl
for the men who were gathered on the Comstock, Wg i fl
Mr. Mackay said: "If I can get my traps together a
and sell my interests here for $5000 I will And me l , 'tjR
a home in some pleasanter country." Ww Ifl
But if any young man determines that he will nil J
s,eek to emulate Mr. Mackay, he must not forget ffill' L"fl
that there are other essentials which he must mfcf ' fl
possess besides those named above. He must keep W J f fl
his heart warm and generous. He must so pass '' 'fl
his days that he can take his self-respect to bed i fl
with him every night; his private life must never 4 1 fl
be questioned and when misfortunes, those shafts If? fl
of fate, come hurtling about him, he must bare Ifr fl
his brow to them and smile as they smite him. H J'J fl
The first $300,000 which Mr. Mackay made he lost. Fp H
When the Sierra Nevada Bonanza collapsed he lost Mi, !fl
$4,000,000. In the wheat deal, engineered by a Iwf (jyjfl
trusted cashier in the Nevada bank, Mr. Mackay's Kj f H fl
personal loss was $6,000,000 and for weeks he did 11 fl
not know that one dollar would be saved from the L ' fl
mighty wreck, but his bearing was more lordly ffi jl
than ever, the smile on his high face was serene mw ''lifl
as ever and the fire in his clear eyes was undim- J a If? "'vfl
med. The loss killed his partner, it but gave a ilJfl'fl
new temper to the steel of Mackay's resolution. if fl
John Mackay's death is an international loss. Hf fl
He was an honor to his race; he was a strong fac- iff 1 fl
tor in the business of two continents; his example ! ? fl
was the highest of all the rich men of America. ffllJi' fl
He moved a peer among the highest; he was ready mEIi fl
to measure swords with the keenest, but his heart BPlk .fl
was down among God's poor and he wanted in- liflHI
creased blessing upon his country, that more op- 91 HH
portunities might be opened to those poor. Kj fl
His highest native attribute was his courage, 9f 191
both moral and physical. To do an unworthy act SI flflB
he held as cowardice, and with him cowardice was slJfil
the unpardonable sin. When he was poor his acts iffll
of charity were countless, as his wealth increased Ufiimill
his heart kept expanding, his old abruptness ImmMII
passed away and he was gentler, kindlier than flvlfll
before. li'HI
He kept his mind under constant training; he EfliH
was as gracious, graceful, as unaffected a gentle- jfsiflBHJ
man as lives; he read much, was a shrewd judge of flflflfl
art, a passionate lover of music. Once when the H
bonanza was giving up $1,000,000 a week and all flHHfl
was excitement, he one day roused himself from a HH
day dream and said, "What is so splendid as a fllH
perfect tenor voice?" He traveled much, was flflflfl
familiar with all Europe, he could with graphic Hflfl
mflfl
3 fQHISIN

xml | txt