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Goodwin's weekly : a thinking paper for thinking people. [volume] (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1902-1929, August 14, 1909, Image 17

Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010218519/1909-08-14/ed-1/seq-17/

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GOODWIN'S WEEKLY 19 I
Mr. and Mrs. Critchlow have returned from
Yellowstone park.
Mrs. Colin Mcintosh and Mrs. J. C. Ross en
tertained informally on Wednesday for Miss John
son and Miss Aimee Best.
Mrs. Rachael Miller has returned from British
Columbia.
In honor if Miss Shirley Palmer, Miss Margaret
Dunn entertained informally on Tuesday evening.
Miss Minette Baer entertained at bridge on
Monday for her guests, the Misses Boehmer, of
Deifver.
Among those who gave box parties on the first
night of the engagement of "The Merry Widow"
were Miss Dorothy Kinney, Mr. and Mrs. J. Frank
Judge, and Samuel Newhouse.
A. D. Lane, of Omaha, is the guest of his
brother, H. Vance Lane.
Mrs. G. F. Stiehl and son have 'returned from
the northwest.
Miss Gretta Cordon, of Logan, who has spent
the past week here, will leave for her home today.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Kearns entertained at an
elaborate dinner at their home on Wednesday
evening, in honor of Cardinal Gibbons.
Mrs. T. C. Bailey and Miss Edna Bailey gave
a unique entertainment at their home on Wednes
day, some fifty of their friends being invited to
witness the parade, following which a luncheon
was served.
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis McCornick and Mrs. Mar
garet Salisbury have returned from San Francisco.
Mrs. Horace Peery, Mrs. Harold Peery, and
Miss Taylor, of Ogden, spent Wednesday in this
city.
Mrs. J. E. Galligher gave a luncheon at the
Country Club on Wednesday for a dozen of her
friends.
Mrs. D. C. Jackling has as her guest her sister,
Mrs. J. T. McCarty, of Los Angeles, who will ac
company Mr d Mrs. Jackling to Seattle, leaving
here In the Jackling car the week after next.
HAVE YOU EVER?
Does your lot in life content you? Are they com
ing as you like?
Are you satisfied with just a daily wage?
When your barber shop is idle or your hands are
on, a strike,
Have you ever thought of writing for tho
stage?
Perhaps you ate a "lumber and it's rather dull in
summer;
Somo congenial task your leisure might en
gage. While you're waiting for an order to repair a
broken pipe,
Have you ever thought of writing for the
stage?
Or perchance you are a tinsmith, or a janitor
mayhap,
Or a writer for a dally printed page,
Whatever be your station or your daily occupa
tion, Have you ever thought of writing for the
stage?
Improvo each idlo minute. There is fame and for
tune in it.
You may be the gcorgemcohan of your age.
Nearly everybody tries it, so we venture to ad
vise it,
Have you ever thought of writing for the
stage?
Bert Lester Taylor, in Chicago Tribune.
Dllly What would we do without tho tele
phone? Dally Go home to our wives. Town Topics.
I HAVE LIVED. F
By Ninette M. Lowater.
I have lived ah, yes, I have lived! Whatever
the note I hear
Of human joy or human woe, In my heart t' echo
rings clear;
My path has led over roughest hills and through
the flowery leas,
And sometimes tempests have swept the way,
and sometimes the summer breeze.
I have loved and I have hated, I have sinned and
I have prayed,
And oft have sought with bitter tears the path
from which I strayed.
I know the woe that makes the world look gray
and worn and old,
I know the bliss that lights the sky with ame
thyst and gold;
And yet. O life, I cannot read the riddle that
thou art,
Or whether given for good or ill for both are
in my heart.
New York Sun. .
JuliaGoing to Marie's dance? Bertha I shall
be out of town that night. Julia I wasn't Invited
either. Cornell Widow.
"What! Spend $100 on a bathing sult?"
"Now, hubby; th's Isn't a bathing suit. This Is a
beach costume." Washington Herald.
She I heard you singing this morning. He
Oh! I sing a little to kill time. She You had
a good weapon. Kansas City Journal.
First Chauffeur Do you find out who you have
run over? Second Chauffeur Of course, I always
read the papers! New York Sun.
"Your now butler seems rather awkward." "Fcr
a butler, yos. But if he's a detective, I think he
does very well.'' Washington Herald.
Father You never heard of a man getting into
trouble following a good example. Son Yes, sir,
I have the counterfeiter. Boston Transcript.
EMIGRATION CANYON.
Th big red cars will take you over the Old
Mormon Trail to the tops of the mountains.
Beginning Tuesday, August 17, we
place on sale all broken lots in men's
3.00, $2.50, $1.00 and $1.50 shirts
fir
$1.15
Patterns exclusive and assortment
the best to select from.
Srj&Azs jrcj2vrsSfsvz& amd mats.
fi 216 SOUTH MAIN ST. I
Summer isn't over by several M
weeks. M
But the dainty gowns that H
were purchased early in the H
season have been worn long , H
enough to cause them to look H
a little the worse for wear. jM
Wouldn't it be a good plan H
to let us help you freshen up H
your wardrobe during the dog H
days? H
Hamilton's I
Smart Shop
216 Main Street I
Saltair Time Table I
GOING RETURNING I
No. 3 030AM No. 4 11.45 M
" 5 12.15 PM ' 0 2.30 PM
7 2 00" " 8 315 "
" 0 2.45 " " 10 400 "
" II 3 30" " 12 4.45 "
" 13 4.15 " " 14 53H "
" 15 500" " 10 0 15 "
" 17 545 " " 18 7.00 "
" 19 030 " 20 7.45 "
" 21 7.15 ' " 22 830 "
" 23 80J " " 21 9.15 "
" 25 8.45 " " 20 10.00 "
" 27 0.30 " " 28 1045 "
" 29 10.15 " " 30 1130 "
" 32 12.15 AM
A Muslin I
Underwear Sale I
WITH NONE IN THE HISTORY OF UN- I
DERWEAR SALES TO MATCH IT1 I
Here are Greater Values than you ever H
bought or ever expected to buy. This Sale H
means $25,000 Worth of High Grade, New I
SNOWY WHITE BEAUTIFUL UNDER- I
GARMENTS to be sold this week at from I
ONE-HALF to ONE-THIRD their Actual
Value. We won't go deeply into the details H
of how we were enabled to make this Ex- I
traordinary Offer, but suffice it to say, sev- H
era I of the leading Underwear Manufactur- H
ers wanted the money to prepare for next
Season's Business, and ready to Sacrifice
Stocks on hand, we were on hand with the H
cash hence these Extraordinary Offerings. I
SALE 1 ARTS PROMPTLY MONDAY I
MORNING AT 8 O'CLOCK. I
1 I

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