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Goodwin's weekly : a thinking paper for thinking people. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1902-1929, December 24, 1910, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010218519/1910-12-24/ed-1/seq-2/

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I 2 GOODWIN'S WEEKLY
H Death is but the final sleep and Is it unreasonable ,
H to believe that as its coming night draws near,
H messages are sent and received, and that loving,
B rescuing arms are stretched down to the immortal
H part to conduct it where there is always music
H and light?
M The Case Of Fred Warren
W ILLIAM MARION REEDY of St. Louis takes
up the case of Fred Warren, who is editor
M of the "Appeal to Reason," a Socialist pa-
H per published in Girard, Kas., who on a charge of
H inciting violence, has been tried, convicted and
H sentenced to six months' imprisonment in a fed-
H erla penitentiary and a fine of $1,500.
M The Mirror recalls the spiriting away of
M Moyer, Haywood and Pettibone from Colorado to
H Idaho, and how it was impossible to get them re-
M leased by any of the courts, and how Warrert
H tried in the same way to get the question before
m the courts, offered a reward of a large sum to
H anyone who would capture and take into the Ken-
M tucky jurisdiction ex-Governor William Taylor of
H that state, who then stood accused of being a par
B tlcipant with Caleb Powers in the murder of Gov-
H ernor Goebel of Kentucky. For issuing that proc-
m lamation it seems Warren was arrested, tried,
B conVicted and sentenced.
m The Mirror cites the cases of the New York
B World and Indianapolis News editors against
M whom ex-President Roosevelt tried to work off
M some political or personal spites through the
M courts and had things so fixed that he thought
m he could drag both editors to Washington and
M have them tried on an obsolete law, and intimates
m that they got away because they and their papers
M are rich and influential.
m We do not care to discuss the matter except to
fl point out the difference between these cases.
M There had been a long series of murders in
M Colorado, which were charged to the Western
m Federation of Miners. Before they were perpe-
H trated, there had been acts of extreme violence
m perpetrated in Idaho by the same organization,
H the then governor of Idaho, as he was bound to
H do under his oath, had taken the necessary means
M to restore order. Long after that and after the
H murders in Colorado the Idaho governor was as-
H sassinated at his own gate. A man was arrested
H who voluntarily confessed to having been the as-
H sassin. He further averred that he was supplied
H with money by the officers of the Federation, to
H go to Idaho for the express purpose of committing
H the murder, and that he had been a principal in
H the Colorado murders. Under such a showing ex-
H traordinary measures were resorted to in order to
H bring those officers under the Idaho jurisdiction.
H Whether the means taken were all legal or not
H we are not discussing.
H Warren, Debs and the others of that company
H denounced the arrest, evidently because they
H heartily approved of the Colorado murders and
H the murder of Governor Steunenberg. The men
H on trial in Idaho were acquitted, and criticism of
H them ended then. The cases of Goebel, Powers
H and Taylor were the outcome of a Kentucky polit-
Hj leal feud, which in Kentucky generally culminat-
H ed in murder. When a crime is committed and
H an accused man is brought into court, the first
H thing sought is the motive behind the crime. We
H do not know, of course, anything about the trial
B of Warren, but suspect from what the Mirror says
H that Warren's motive was what was tried; that
H the judge and jury believed that could he have
H carried out his purpose, and had Governor Taylor
H turned over to the friends of Governor Goebel and
H hanged, it would be a feather in Warren's cap
H and would have hastened the day which Warren
H Is praying for, when society will be disintegrated
I and all laws set at naught. If that was the case,
H then a great deal of the Mirror's sympathy is
H wasted, or at least not available.
H Of course the freedom of the press is invio-i
lable, but like every other form of freedom, in
this country it must be subject to the laws..
When an editor, throughv his paper, strikes
foul blows at society, the liberty of society to
strike back is unquestioned.
As to the suits incited by the ex-president
against the editors of the World and News; they
were born of pure spite and meanness; and the
law he acted under would not last fifteen mintues
in arty competent court. He hoped to make those
editors trouble and expense, but succeeded only
In giving them most valuable advertisements.
They also emphasized the value of the old
rule, that when equity is sought in the courts, he
who seeks it must go into court with clean hands.
Christmas
CHRISTMAS will come in at midnight, tonight.
This little poem on Christmas was written
in California fifty years ago by Charles P.
Craddock:
"O, winds that blow
From palmy isles or realms of snow,
Be still!
O, waves that roll,
In majesty from pole to pole,
Be still!
O, sea, no more
'With vain complainings vex the shore;
Be still!
Peace, peace to winds and waves and sea,
God's peace for all eternity.
Lo! wise men bring
From the rich east their offering
To Judah's king!
And at his feet
With precious gifts and odors sweet,
Fallworshipping.
O, stars that gleam
Fio.n bending skies, on Jordan's stream
Together sing
Peace, peace, God's peace on land and sea
Good will to men eternally!"
Christmas Shopping
ALL the week past people have been Christmas
shopping. The old, the young, the middle
aged, the mothers, the fathers and the chil
dren, yes, and the young men and young women;
yes, more still. An old grizzled miner, evidently,
entered a famous saloon yesterday and said:
"Does any express run to , in Nevada?
What will four quart bottles of your best cost
and what will the express charges be?" Being
Informed, he from some recess m his clothing
produced an old time California buckskin purse,
untied the string, poured out some gold pieces on
the counter and said: "Take the damages for
your poison and the express charges, and send
the bundle to Sikes, Brennen and Curly, ,
Nev. Hold on! Put in three plugs of black jack
for smoking." Then he explained that the three
cusses were living on an outside prospect, and
Christmas was coming, and they would want to
celebrate. But, said the vender of the poison,
"Why do you send four bottles rather than three
or six?" "Who's running this?" was the reply.
"What an inquisitive tenderfoot you must be!
Cant you see that they will get outside of a
bottle apiece the first night, and that next morn
ing they will need a round or two each to steady
their nerves?"
And he went away, and just then an old man
passed, looking furtively into t.ie windows, and
he was followed by three boys and a girl, and it
was clear that they had been pooling their cap
ital for something for mamma; and young ladies
passed, and by their blushes that they had just
bought something for no matter whom; and there
were young men who wore that sheepish but de-
HHHHHIHHHHHI
termined look which gave them dead away; and
there were mothers whose faces showed that
they never so much longed to ue rich as at
Christmas time; and the crowd makeB a pano
rama which Is beautiful to look upon, for it all
seems moving toward that shore where the song
will be "Glory to God in the Highest," and the
refrain will be "Peace on earth and to man V
good will."
The Divine Sarah
EASTERN papers tell us that the youthfulneas J
displayed by Sarah Bernhardt is "uncanny.-' jjjj
They need not worry about Sarah; she is I
only just as aged as she feels. She has tried all If
manner of experiments; she Is content now to
take things as they come and have just as jolly
a time as she can. If now and then a twinge of
pain strikes her, she does not sit down and say
"this is the beginning of the end," rather orders
it off, and with delicious French anathemas bids jrX
it not return for fifteen years yet, and assuming
the character of a young girl plays it so near to i
life that by her acting her art she Js perpetually t
renewing her youth. ,
Then the footlights help her. Before them she
has been subduing men for a good while, and !
she likes to keep up the practice. "They are
such what you say such suelers." Sarah Is
still divine. May she long make the world glad.
- i
The Filipinos
A RECENT visitor to the Philippines gives an
interview in which he says the people )
of those islands do not like Ameri- !,
cans; that the higher classes are quite out- I
spoken In their dislike. This is possibly true. A
stream cannot rise higher than its source. They
are a race that is blood-tainted. Not many of
them are at all proud of their ancestors, thou
jands of them are In doubt who their ancestors
were, and their blood on all sides is treacherous
blood. Again, gratitude is a trait that has never
been developed among them. Most of them were
but a trifle better than slaves when the Americans ,
went there. Not one of them was secure either
in life or property. The different tribes were
always at war; and the ignorance of all but a
trifling few was most profund, while the exac- . I
tlons of the Spanish tax gatherers kept the ordi- '
nary dwellers there on the verge of starvation
from the cradle to the grave. The Americans
have established order; they have established
peace; they have built roads that the poor might
gel their products to market; they have given
all perfect liberty to do any legitimate thing;
they have built hundreds of school houses and
instructors to open to them the first leaves in
the book of knowledge; they are enforcing the
laws which secure to every man what is his own;
they are promoting them to positions as fast as -, I
they can trust them; they have in ten years 7P
wrought a complete transformation there, and
in doing that have trenched upon no right which
was ever theirs. This would naturally awaken
the gratitude of any save a mongrel race. It does
not theirs, because they are morally irrespon
sible. There is nothing to do but carry on the
work along the lines of right; but it is a notice '
that the United States wants no more territory
-that is peopled by mongrels, for they are not
worth redeeming.
Russia, says a contemporary, has but the ghost
of a navy. And her last one didn't even have the
ghost of a chance. 3-
General Wood declares against fortifying the
big canal. He's talking through his Panama.
Canada wants to annex Maine. It would be
just like Democratic luck to have that happen.
HHHDHiHHHHHMHi

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