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Deseret farmer. [volume] (Provo, Utah) 1904-1912, July 25, 1908, Image 15

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010218520/1908-07-25/ed-1/seq-15/

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1 Saturday, juLy 25, 1908. THK DESBRET PARMfiR i5 H
most beyond -our powers to conceive.
H But much of the water that any soil
K can store is really of no use whatever
B to croppage, and there is a most cx
B ccllent reason why. Water in the soil
B is of two kinds. That which is of
B permanent or material value is held
B by tension, capillary power, to each
B particle or grain of soil, around which
B ,l gathers -and clings as a fine film.
B The surplus water, that which ss
B tablishcs saturation and not infro
B quently is an dement of injury, fills
the pores and angles between the
grains and soil particles. It is the
rapid evaporation of this superfluous
and unwanted, useless water, thot es
tablishes the injurious capillary pores,
cracks and crevices in the soil, creat
ing little flues through which the de
sirable moisture finally (nd the more
easily) follows the saturation water
that was never of any use at all. Thus
we get fli glimpse, in advance, of what
excessive irrigation may be respon
sible for. Here as a vital factor en
ters in the unavoidable study of the
capacity of our soil and the wwiil nu
bility of moisture for Its needs. The
grower must be persistently more or
less of a student of his soil, otherwise
genuine success cannot be, his. lie
should know the character of his
soils in their relation to ground or
permanent water, this factor nlonc
frequently determining the extent of
needful irrigation. In other word?,
no one can intelligently irrigate his
land unless he understands what ca
pacity his soil possesses for retention
of that water, and that in turn .is af
fected by .sub-soil conditions, with
I which ground water, seepage wild oth
er conditions have to do. The irri
gator must be governed by this in the
freedom or -care with which he ap
plies water artificially.
In discussing saturation of soil with
water, I want to -call attention to the
harm done by "excessive irrigation.
There is one point especially that de
serves considerable thought. All soil
needs aemition that is, the entrance
of nir is imperative. Yet if these
pores of which I spook are entirely
filled 'with water, how can air enter?
It cannot, of course. It may be im
agined that when this surplus water
has passed away by evaporation, there
will be nothing to hinder the free en
trance of air; but this again is crron
eous, for so groat is the action in-
Iduced by evaporation that there is an
air cunont in but one ditclion, and
MARKET QUOTATIONS.
Owing to our extensive circulation,
market reports must be closed Wed
nesday noon. Figures quoted arc Salt
Lake wholesale prices. These quota
tions arc given at the request of many
subscribers and arc furnished and
corrected weekly by the responsible
firm of Vogcler Seed and Produce Co.
Fruits.
Lemons, case, $5.00; oranges, $5.00;
bananas, $2.50 a bunch and up.
Butter and Cheese.
Creamery butter, 25c; cheese, full
cream, 13c to 14c.
Vegetables.
Cabbage, per lb., 2c; potatoes, new
Utoh's, $1.50 per cwt.
Poultry and Egj.
Live hens 11c per lb.
Dressed hens 13 to 14c per lb.
Eggs, strictly fresh, per case, $6.50
to $7.00.
Grain, Hay and Flour.
Wheat, per 100 lbs., $1.90; corn, 100
lbs., $1.80; chop corn, 100 lbs., $1.85;
oats, per 100 lbs. $1.80; barley, per 100
rolled, $1.60; bran, per 100 lbs., $1.30;
flour, high patent, per 100 lbs., $2.70;
straight grade, per 100 lbs., $2.50; al
falfa, baled, 60c. cwt.; timothy, baled,
75c. cwt.; straw, .baled, 35c.
Honey.
Honey, case, $2.75 and $3.00, ex
tracted, 7j4c lb.
that is upward, so long as any mois
ture remains below to pass up and
out; and it may as well be understood
that when said moisture is entirely
depleted, there is no longer any need
of air, nor will it do any good. This
f r PLOWS
fM DEET CULTIVATORS B
JKXWr-S&k ffi SEEDERS
"E-- o end a beautifully illustrated brochure.
The P. & O. Beet Cultivator requires only one lever to raise or lower M
the gangs. That makes it simple. A supplemental lever levels the gangs B
when one wheel sinks too deeply into the ground. Positively the best B
device ever put on a Beet Cultivator, and to be found on no other. The B
only cultivator that will plow at a uniform depth. Gangs are held in the B
ground at two paints, pressure springs giving an elastic movement to B
overcome uneyenness of ground; more rigid than cultivators suspended B
from ccnicr alone. Wheels arc pivoted, and under foot control, respond- B
ing to the slightest movement. All P. & O. Beet Tools have features not B
" on othcrs- 0ur Bect To1 Pamphlet explains them Write for it. B
All P. & O. goods are backed by an unqualified guarantee. Sixty-six B
years of "Knowing How" hammered into every one of them. B
PARLiN & ORENDORFF CO., - - Canton. Illinois
UTAH IMPLEMENT -VEHICLE CO., General Agenti
SALT LAKE CITY UTAH B
tremendous disadvantage of having
the soil overfilled with water can
scarcely 'be overdrawn. This condi
tion prevents free circulation of air,
which is as essential to the growth
of the plant as any of the foods upon
which it thrives. Proper fertility of H
the soil is maintained only through H
the propagation of minute organisms, B
known as bacteria. B
(Continued Next Week.) B
AWARDED FIRST PREMIUM AT STATE FAIR. GOLD MEDAL BY STATE AGRICUL- I J
TURAL SOCIETY OF SACRAMENTO, CAL., ALSO GOLD MEDAL AWARDED BY MID.- M M
WINTER FAIR, AND LP WIS AND CLARK EXPOSITION PORTLAND, OREGON. I B
' ijafljfty v l
TION IN '" .- rt&&WW$FXt ." 'WBUlB v 1
PLOW ING BBMJraPSBaBi " rl il-v mmmkii hmji'IT 'M B iWft' H
BBffllBrT'TWSlr ' fcis9!H9PV DAY AND M jH
aBIM -Ji A MtKjKA HEADLIGHT W M
BHjHBBHKHflkMSnHB l x o o W B
Ino HORSE POWER PLOWING ENGINh. J H
From 50 to 100 Acres Plowed each day doing the work much better than by animal power and at half B
the expense per acre, More than two hundred in successful operation. Every one a success. H
The above illustration represents the Utah Arid Farm Company's STEAM PLOWING OUTFIT M
at work on their farm at Nc.dii, Utah. This engine is plowing 50 acres per day of ten hours at an M
expense of 50 cents per acre. And it was also used by them to pull a "BEST" Steam Combined Har- i H
vester on the same farm and harvested an average of 65 acres per day, and at the nominal expense of , JM
Socts. an acre. The grain was cut, threshed, recleancd and sacked in one operation and ready for the mill B
The SUCCESS of DRY FARMING is THE STEAM PLOW AND COMBINED HARVESTER H
For further information address B
THE BEST MANUFACTURING GO., or THE G. T. INGERSOLL MACHINERY CO., : ' fl
. .-hiih BELL PHONE 1909 P O- BOX 794 I N D. PHONE 846 B
SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 321 dooly blk. SALT LAKE CITY. UTAH B

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