OCR Interpretation


Deseret farmer. [volume] (Provo, Utah) 1904-1912, August 08, 1908, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010218520/1908-08-08/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

Saturday, august 8, 190 TEE DESERET FARMER 3 H
If you really knew how good the used to be fully appreciated ; there wagon itself when put to the Hesse Ludlow is stronger, easier
Hesse Ludlow wagon is, your next is no other wagon just like them. actual test, puts up the un- riding, and more durable Jhan H
wagon would surely be a Hesse. Our talk to you, we hope will disputable arguments of superior- any other wagon n'dwv'bcing'- H
Hesse Ludlow wagons must be be convincing, yet we know the ity. In brief, the offered. H
CONSOLIDATED WAGON & MACHINE CO.
I Leading Implement Dealers H
. : HOUSES AT SALT LAKE, OGDEN, LOGAN, PRICE, UTAH; IDAHO FALLS, MONTPELIER, IDAHO. H
JOSEPH F.JMITH, W. S. McCORNICK, MELVIN D. WELLS, GRANT HAMPTON, GEO. T. ODELL, H
President. Vice-President. Secy, and Trcas. Asst. Secy, and Trcas. General Mgr. H
each driver with an accurate map of
distances and a time card. By this
each driver will be enabled to judge
at any time the location of the ma
chine preceding him.
Representatives of the Tourist all
along the route have been notified of
the trip and will be in readiness to re
ceive members of the tour. At San
Jose the Bsy City contingent will join
the party.
fin regard to the tour Manager Con
well said yesterday:
yp "This is a project for Tourist car
t owners and we want Tourist owners
and Tourist admirers to reap the
benefits of the jaunt. We arc going
I to work for good roads along the line
and arc going to show many urban
residents that automobile people arc
not always out for the bones and
scalps of pedestrians and farmers.
The Tourist Company will carry re
pairs and mechanics simply for the
accommodation of the contestants in
the 'run and two machines filled with
, tires and tire fixtures will take care
of all trouble in tliat line. No one
r need stay out for fear of hardships or
expense."
Pilots Smith and Saliland say that
the trip can be made easily and- com
fortably in tlio time stated and special
attention has been given the require
ments of inexperienced drivers in
planning the route. Examiner, July
FARMERS, ATTENTION 1 Wc
are in the market at all times for
Wheat, Oats and Barley. Write to
us for prices. We pay Spot Cash.
DAVID ROBBINS & CO.
Salt Lake City, Utah.
WHAT'S THE USE?
Won't some feller rise and tell me
What on earth a feller docs,
In the night time after supper with
the day's work put away.
When he sits out on the gal'ry and
hears the cicadas buz?,
Jf he hasn't got no babies for to romp
around an' play;
If he ain't no little feller fcr to run to
him for hugs,
If he ain't no little lassie fer to give
him no caress,
If he ain't no little baby fcr to chase
the candle bugs,
What on earth is there to glad him
or to soothe his loncsomcncss?
If, when he's downstairs o' mornings
with the niornin' paper, he
Hasn't got no gold-haired lassie fcr
to speak down th' stair
In her nighty an' come rompin' with
a giggle to his knee.
With her bare pink toes a-twinklin'
an' her golden, ycllcr hair
Just a-flyin' with the gladness of the
dewy mornin' time,
With the light o joy a-twinklin' in
her eyes o' bonny blue
Oh, without no- little babies for to
dance to him an' climb
Up into his lap o' mornin's what
docs any feller do?
Without any little babies lyin' in a
cuddled heap,
In a little snow white chamber in a
little snow white bed,
With the covers kicked all crooked
where they're lyin' fast asleep,
With a little fist a-rcstin' under
neath a yellow head,
What's the use o' bcin' livin', what's
the use of goin' down
To the day's work of a mornin' an'
o comin' home o' nights,
What's the bonuty of the country or
the pleasures of the town,
With no baby lips a-waitin' for your
daddy-kiss o' nights?
- Judd Mortimer Lewis in Houiiton
Post.
His mother tucked four-year-old
Johnny away in the top berth of the
slecping-acr. Hearing him stirring in
the middle of the night, she softly
called: "Johnny, do you know where
you are?" "Toursc I do," he re
turned; vpm in the top drawer."
Yout'li. "
HAPPENED IN OUR MIDST.
Mr. Booth Tarkington, the Indiana
novelist, tells this story to illustrate
the journalistic enterprise of a cer
tain small town of his nativj State:
Starting out for a hunting trip Mr.
Tarkington made his way to the town
of W , where he was to be joined
by several friends coming by rail
from farther up the country. At the
hotel fronting on the railroad tracks
the hunter put up late in the evening,
his favorite bird-dog quartered in the
back yard. In the morning it was dis
covered that the dog had disappeared.
"Have you a newspaper in town?'
Mr. Tarkington asked the landlord,
who sat tilted back in a chair on the
front porch, enjoying a morning pipe.
"Wc surchavc, sir," replied the
landlord, pointing across the way to
a sign that swung above the shoemak
er's shop. "The Morning News, out
at four o'clock every day, rain or
shine."
"Going to advertise for my dog,"
the novelist remarked as he went
down the steps.
The editor of-the Morning News,
the one printer and the printer's "dev
U" held the fort, all busily getting to.
gether the day's edit on of the paper.
The editor had just completed a para
graph or two, noting the arrival in
"our midst" of the writer, and as
suming that the caller was the notable
visitor, received himi with due cere
mony, assuring Mr. Tarkington that
though "wc are just going to press wc
will be glad to hold the paper to in
sert your ad., sir."
"Fifty dollars' reward for the return
of pointer dog, answering to name of H
Rex, which disappeared from the H
yard of the Mansion House Monda H
night," read the advertisement. JM
Returning to his hotel, within half H
an hour Mr. Tarkington had. decided H
that it might be best to add: "No M
questions asked." " H
Across the tracks o the Mbriiing M
News again went the advertiser. The H
office was deserted, save for the little H
lean, redheaded, freckled-nosed "dev- H
il" who sat perched upon a high H
stool, his knees drawn up, gazing M
pensively out of the dusty window. M
"Where's everybody?" Mr. Tnrkiiig- M
ton asked blithely, putting his head M
in at the door. M
"Gawn to hunt the dawg," the boy fl
answered laconically, M
The Post, ' H
" - iFACPB. I H
Some laws, like pictures painted fair,
Have but a sorry .fate in store. fl
They're famgd with mpst attentive
Hung up and nc'crconsidcrcd more M
Washington Star M
The "Descret Farmer" needs the H
support and encouragement of every M
farmer every person interested in H
agricultural pursuits in this inter- H
mountain country. Send us a dollar! H
Let us send you the paper a year! H
WANTED. A first-class, reliable H
man for my farm. Married or single. H
Will furnish house. Prefer 3 to 5 H
year contract. We raise stone fruits, H
peaches, cherries and apricots on H
a commercial basis; also poultry, H
heavily. Will pay liberally for the H
right kind of a man. H
W. S. RAMER, ,
503 Atlas Bllock. Salt Lake City. ,

xml | txt