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Deseret farmer. [volume] (Provo, Utah) 1904-1912, August 15, 1908, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010218520/1908-08-15/ed-1/seq-2/

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I 2 TUB DBSERET FARMER SATURDAY, AUGUST ,s, .So8. 'I
I ALFALFA
H (ONEt OF NATURE'S RICHEST GIFTS TOrMAN.). i-.
I EMERSON ALFALFA RENOVATOR
H Will destroy weeds and all foreign grasses in your alfalfa fields; loosens
H the soil to a depth two to four inches, forming a dust mulch which protects
H the roots from the sun and holds the moisture which otherwise would
H evaporate.
H Write us for further information. Sold only by
I MILLER -CAHOON CO.
H PIONEER IMPLEMENT DEALERS OP UTAH
L. C. MILLER, Gtn'l Met. MURRAY, UTAH
I I THREE GAR LOADS OF REO AUTOMOBILES
SHIPPED OUR COUNTRY TERRITORY IN MAY
H WHO WILL BE THE NEXT Mfeffifttll?
H TO SHOW WISDOM ALONG 'BBHjgLffeftWk
H THESE LINES, TO SHOW '"PBHSSljBSyi
APPRECIATION OF MOD (fmf W HIT Wt
H ERN UP-TO-DATE METH- R'V
I REMEMBER A REO AUTOMOBILE
CAN BE USED FOR A GREAT MANY PURPOSES TO YOUR
ADVANTAGE.
H WRITE AND ASK US ABOUT THIS.
I SHARNAN AUTOMOBILE CO.
I lof-in W. . T tto it. iALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
I THE WORLDS BEST LAYERS I
. wk
White Orpingtons White Leghorns I
BRED IN LINEBred by Selection for Heaviest 1
Known Egg Production. A life devoted to the study f
of Increased Egg Production is giving results that I
will please and amply repay you for investigation, f
C. S. GORLINE
J224 Eat J2 Soulh Street SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH ft
AGRICULTURE -,
CHEMICAL PROBLEMS.
y Milling Qualities of Utah hcat
Prof. J. C. Hogenson, A. C. U.
'
Investigations regarding the chemi
cal and milling charactci isficsyof
siome of the various wheats growniin
Utah have been carried on since thc
season of 1904, buKUhc first report
of these investigations has just been
published in bulletin form by the Ex
periment Station of the Agricultural
College of Utah.
The wheat industry of the state has
received a new impetus during the
last few years and .many new varieties
have blcn amll arc being introduced.
It becomes important to know how
these varieties ' grown in Utah under
various -conditions compare in their
milling and chemical characteristics
with the same wheat in other partsjpf
the country, and to this end the in
vestigations under consideration were
begun.
The work reported represents the
analysis of ninety-one samples of
wheat grown on the several experi
mental farms, including wheat grojwn
under both irrigated and arid condi
tions. The varieties include all the
V
more common ones grown in Utah-,ftt
St?
the present time, as well as a number
of other promising wheats whicjif
Iwvc recently been introduced intp
the state. m
The investigations were conducted
by Robert Stewart, chemist, ind&
Joseph E. Greaves, assistant chemist,
the wheat being milled on an ex
perimental mill. This mill has
two pairs of 7-inch rolls,, one
pair smooth and the other corrugated," "
and a small sifter. It is drivenMy a
10-horsepowcr electric motor, and,
like similar mills, turns out a straight
grade of flour that is suitable for
analytical purposes. The methods of
analysis urt were, with very slight
modification "-those employed by
Snyder nnd included the usual deter
minations as to protein content, the
amount rnd composition fcf the glut
en, and the percentage ofjaeiditynft
FARMERS, ATTENTION! We
are in the market at all times. for
Wheat, Oats and Barley. Write to
us for prices. We pay Spot Cash.
DAVID ROBBINS & CO.
Salt Lake City, Utah.
ash. The results are especially in f&
tcrcsting as they show comparisons 4
between common bread wheats and
-Durum' varieties -and rlso between ir
rigated wheat and that grown under
' semi-arid conditions.
A distinct variation is shown in the
yield of milling products obtained
from the various varieties) and also in
the same varieties fiom the different
experimental farms. The variation 1
between the bread wheats -is as high
as 10 per cent, while the variation be- ,
'tween the Durum varieties is as high
as So per cent. It is noteworthy, how
ever, that the average yield of flour
was higher from the bread wheats
than it was from the Durums. The
average moisture content of flour
from Utah wheats is considerably less
than that accepted tiu the standard for
wheat grown elsewhere in the coun
try.. As a rule the moisture content
of the Durum whca'.s is higher than
that of the bread vanctics, although
Ihc difference is small.
The protein content of all the
wheats' is very high, the average for
the bread varieties being 16.76 per
cent and for the Durum varieties
. 17.14. The variety grown on irrigated
land has the lowest protein content, j
but when this variety is grown on j
arid farms its protein content in- 5
creases. The protein content of the
bran and shorts of thc'.brcad and
Difrum wheats is practically the same
The moist and diy gluten of all
varieties 'arc very high, the averages
$tfothcr bread wheats being 50 49 Por
cent of wet gluten and 18,52 per -cent
of dry gluten, and . for tM. Durums
466oBcr cent wet and 179 Pcr cnt
'riln this connection, as showing the
influence of climatic conditions, it' is
interesting to note, the differences in
tljp gluten content of Blue Stem and
Fife wheat grown in Utah, in the
Middle West and in Mainc. The
western-grown BJue Stem contained
24.07 per cent of dry gluten and 999
per cent of wet gluten. The same
variety grown in Maine yielded 24.60
per cent of wet gluten and 11.32 per
cent of dry gluten, whHe Utah grown
fffwe Stem contained 45 59 W cent
of wet gluten rand 17-39 Pr ccnt of i
dry gluten, The differences in the
gluten content of Fife wheat were
practically as great, being as follows:

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