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Deseret farmer. [volume] (Provo, Utah) 1904-1912, August 22, 1908, Image 3

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Saturday, AUGUST ,1908. THE, D2SERET FARMJ5R . 3
knew lie had a wheat that yielded
equally las well planted winter or
spring. Did he have ia good wheat?
The chemists and experts at the sta
tion tested it and pronounced it a
good quality of hard wheat. Hard
wheat! That was sufficient. But
Adams knew he must have patience
for another year.
In the fall of 1906 the 1545 pounds
were planted in fields by the side of
the famous Blue Stem and Club wheat
grown in that section. Watching their
comparative growth, Mr. Adams
picked on the same day green heads
of Club wheat and green heads of his
Alaska wheat, the latter so many
times larger than, the ordinary wheat
that the Cub wheat seemed hardly
started. The farmer was jubilant.
Then Nature took a hand, and hail
storms of the worst kind came, beat
ing down the ordinary wheat until it
was not fit to harvest. The farmer,
discouraged, went out to his Alaska
wheat fields and saw that the sturdy
stems had partly withstood the
storms, and he finally harvested 53,000
pounds of seed.
Now was the time to make his final
test. ITc had enough for a test from
winter grown. Taking this to the ex
perimental station, he soon received
a report which made him for the first
time sure he had something worth
giving to the public. The station
chemist wrote:
'The kernels from the fall sown
wheat were plump and sound and
doubtless will gttulc No. 1. Judging
from the chemical and physical con
dition of this sample, it wffll probably
take rank with the best grade of Blue
Stem for flour.
"The sample grown from spring
sown wheat showed Iby chemical an
1 alysis a somewhat higher protein con
tent (this being an indication of its
probable strength for bread-anaking
; purposes). I am inclined to think that
I the wheat that you have here is the
j! equal, if not the superior, of our Blue
I Stem for flour-making purposes. I
should like to make a mill test when
ever you can send me a sufficient
quantity for that purpose."
ft These are the facts about the won-
11 derful wheat of which the world will
soon be talking. Farmers do not be
ll live it; wheat speculators do not be-
fi m flieve it; but those who have traveled
M (tcsce Jt? do, believe it. Mft Adams
m
had his fields surveyed and1 has ab
solute proof of the yield from each
field. He has tried his wheat in 6th
fcr lands, and in some places it did
better than in Idaho. Alabama raised
wheat from it with leaves seven
eighths of an inch broad, growing like
cornstalks.
As a last test, Mt. Adams sent sin
gle heads of wheat to other parts of
the country where he had men he
could trust to plant and ascertain the
result. Reports arc just coming to
him, and he finds that in other States
his Alaska wheat docs better than on
its home oil. In Alabama a head wa3
planted December 31, was up January
30, waist-high April 1, with leaves
seven-eighths of an inch Ibroad, and
July 7 was harvested. It showed to
be hard wheat of a fine quality, and
the one head yielded the same as the
first head planted in Idaho.
Under ordinary soil conditions the
new wheat will yield two hundred
bushels to the acre, under extra con
ditions above that.
What will be the outcome? Had
all America had Alaska wheat to seed
this year, the American crop alone
would have been five billions of bush
els. Docs that not mean a revolution
in the wheat industry? Will the food
of the poor become so cheap that
there will be no famines? Or will
farm property rise in value with the
capacity for the yicldi? All this is
conjecture, but these things arc cer
tain: The wheat Alaska lias given us will
withstand hail if not too heavy.
It will withstand frost.
It grows hard wheat from fall sow
ing. It yields up to 222 bushels to the
acre.
It will grade up to No. 1 hard.
It will turn the vast areas in Mis
souri and the South and in tlu far
West into hard wheat areas.
And, last and best of all, it will
bring back wheat raising to the worn
out farms of the East where, with
wheat yields two hundred bushels to
the acre, farmers can afford to use
manures and chemicals, and make a
profit.
If all America could seed with the
new wheat it would, at only fifty cents
a bushel, add nearly two and a half
billions of dollars to the wealth of
the farmers -every year. Oscar F. G.
Day in Saturday Evening Post.
FARMERS, ATTENTION! We
arc in the market at all times for
Wheat, Oats and Barley. Write to
us for prices. We pay Spot Cash.
DAVID ROBBINS & CO.
Salt Lake City, Utah.
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