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Deseret farmer. [volume] (Provo, Utah) 1904-1912, September 05, 1908, Image 12

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H 12 THE DESERET FARMER 'Saturday, September 5, 1968. I
H THE SCENIC LINE
H Coonectinc at Ogdcn Uatoa
H Depot with all
H SOUTHERN PACIFIC AND
OREGON SHORT LINE
H TRAINS.
M Tb Only Transcontinental
H Lint Patting Directly
M Tbrouch Salt Lakt City.
J I BflMdicUy Equipped Faat Jfc
Train Daily between J
Ogden and Denver f
Via Tkrce Separate amd 11
I Dietfec; Sceaic JtoUs. W
H THROUGH PULLMAN AND
H ORDINARY SLEEPING
CARS, DENVER, OMAHA,
KANSAS CITY, ST. LOUIS
H AND CHICAGO WITHOUT
H CHANGE. FREE RECLIN-
ING CHAIR CARS. - - -H
Personally Conducted Excitr
m sions.
DINING CAM, SERVICE
A LA CARTE ON ALL
THROUGH TRAINS.
m For ratee, folders, free HI
m trated booklets, etc., Inquire of
H your nearest ticket agent, tpecl
M fying the Rio Grande Routt, or
1 address
H LA, BENTON,
' G. A. F. D., ftak Lake City.
I ; A FARM TELEPHONE J
B ( ' Will save enough horseflesh
M and time every month to pay ' ,
m its cost for a year, and in
H , emergencies, when time is ,
1 the big thing, it may save
B 1 your home and your life. i ?
1 , Thousands of farms in this i
B ' country are now equipped
H with telephones and you
H could not persuade one of
Hj these farmers who has prov- '
H ed its value to allow his tele- '
H phone to be removed. '
Hj It helps to make farm life
H pleasant and saves money. '
H You owe it to yourself to '
H have a telephone pn YOUR '
! ' farm. Call on the nearest '
; manager of the Rocky Moun- m
tain Bell Telephone Com-
H pany and he will tell you J
how you oan get it at small B
, cost, or address the General M
Contract Agent, Rocky W
H Mountain Bell Telephone
H Company, Salt Lake City. C
: Rocky Mountain Bell f
Telephone Go. I
i
DR. W. H. STROTHER, O. D.
Authority on Eye Troubles
Broken Lenses Duplicated By Mail
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
Call, or Write to Me if Your Eyes
Trouble You.
Examination and Consultation Free
Wi th C. E. W. BOWERS, Jeweler
73 Main St, Salt Lake City
ery
; He Who Travels I
ea
VIA THE I
B
! PASSES THROUGH THE 1
, BEST DRY FARMING f
' DISTRICTS IN UTAH 1
' AND NEVADA. 1
FOR INFORMATION RE- 1
i GARDING RATES AND 1
1 LAND WRITE OR CALL I
ON I
, J. H. BURTNER, D. P. A. 1
' xfe Main St, Salt Lake City. 1
ViBjWP" $
OFFICIAL DIRECTORY
UTAH BEE-KEEPERS'
ASSOCIATION.
President, E. S. Lovcsy,
355 Sixth East Street, Salt Lake City.
First Vice-President, R. T. Rhees,
View, Weber County.
'Second Vice-President, W. Belliston,
Nephi.
Secretary, A. Fawson, Grantsvillc.
Asst. Sec'y, Jas. Neilscn, Holliday.
County Vice-Presidents:
Salt Lake W. C. B ergon, Mill Creek.
Utah George Hone, Payson.
Wasatch J. A. Smith, Heber City.
Davis H. J. Butcher, KaysvMIe.
Box Elder J Hansen, Bear River City
Juab. Thomas Belliston, Nephi.
Washington J. L. Bunting, St George
Cache Nephi Miller, Providence.
Morgan T. R. G. Welch, Morgan.
Emery Chris Ottoson, Huntington.
Carbon. W. H. Horsley, Price.
Sevier R. A. Lowe, Austin.
Sinpete Walter Cox, Fairview.
Weber Mrs R, X Rhees, Vievt
DeBouzek-Huntze E
EngraYera and Electrotypes
'Successors to
DE BOUZEK ENG. CO.,
37-3$ W. South Temple St
SALT LAKE CITY
ENTOMOLOGY j
Edited by Prof. E. G. Titus, State
Agricultural College.
-WHY WE NAME THINGS.
There exists among all animals cer
tain characters which arc not pos
sessed by plants or minerals. Hence
we first have three divisions that arc
known as the Animal Kingdom, the
Plant or Vegetable Kingdom and the
Mineral Kingdom. By far the greater
number of Natural objects that we
have occasion to notice wc can readily
place in one of these divisions or
Kingdoms.
In the Animal Kingdom there arc
so many forms presented to our view
that wc find it necessary to have some
kind of a classification in order to
study them properly. It has been es
timated that there arc now living up
on the earth more than a million and
half species of animals. The immen
sity of the problem may now be real
ized and t is not to be wondered that
a system of classification had to be
built up as the years went by in order,
that wc nvoy properly place the dif-
0
fcrcnt forms that have been recog
nized and described.
Some animals arc so simple in form
and have such slight changes in tjicir
life-history that they arc considered
as occupying the bottom of the list.
These arc animals composed of a sin
gle cell. A cell is a minute mass of
substance known as protoplasm, hav
ing life, and the ability to reproduce,
to feed and usually to move. The
next members of the group have a
more complex structure, but arc still
very simple and so there -are arranged
groups to contain animals having
some characteristics in common; each
group as we pass up the list having
more and more complex "characters;
in habits, in form, in its methods of
life and in its relationship to sur
rounding things, than the one just be
fore it. It is impossible to limit these
groups absolutely because there are
often animals in each group which
are either a little too highly developed
to be put in the next lower group, or,
on the other hand1, are so much more
complex than the majority of the
members in the group in which they
are placed as to be almost (but not
quite) plaGdd in the group ahead.
Over half way up this list placed
above the true worms but just below
the true shells, stands the group to
which the Insects belong. They are
only one of several lesser groups that
belong in this large group. Some bf
the others arc almost as well known
to most of us as arc the insects, for
here belong the crayfish and lobsters, ,
the scorpions, the spiders and mites
(red spider), and the centipedes and
millipedes (thousQnd-lcggcd worms). i
All of the animals belonging to this
group have the common character of
a body composed of several more or
less similar rings, some of the rings
having upon them jointed legs.
If you will examine a crayfish or a
lobster you will find that it has at
least five pairs of legs, rarely more,
never naturally less. A look at a scor
pion will show you four pairs of legs, i
a spider also has four pairs of legs,
but its front pair does not grow large !j
strong claws or pincers as do thc
crayfish and the scorpion. A mite,
our brown mite or red spider, for in
stance, has four pairs of legs and is I
very closely related to the spider. The
ticks belong with the mites. The cen
tipedes have a single pair of legs to
each one of the segments or rings of
the body that bears legs, While the j
millipedes, or thousand1 legged worms, 1
have two pairs on each ring that has
any legs. The centipedes arc really j
bcifcfvcial since they feed almost en
tirely upon insects and other minute
animals that live under bark, stones
or logs. Some of the centipedes have
poison glands which open through the
claws of the first pair of legs and can
really indict, a rather serious injury,
'but those species which are large
enough to cause much trouble nearly
all live in warm regions. The thous- nL
and-leggcd worms arc never poison
ous, but sometimes cause injury to
plants by feeding upon the young and
tender shoots.
It can readily be seen that we can
not continue on down in our divisions
of the large Animal Kingdom without
something more definite than the term
group, larger group and smaller
group; hence, to each one of the di
visions of the kingdom has been ap
. nUgd the term branch and each
- branch given iTdistinctive name. The
ontt to whioh the inseGts spiders,

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