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Deseret farmer. [volume] (Provo, Utah) 1904-1912, September 12, 1908, Image 12

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010218520/1908-09-12/ed-1/seq-12/

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12 THE PES E R 35 T FARMER Saturday, September 12, 1908
I THE SCENIC LINE
I Connecting at Of den Union
Depot with all
IOUTHERN PACIFIC AND
OREGON SHORT LINE
TRAINS.
The Only Transcontinental
Line Pawing Directly
Through Salt Lake City.
JSplesdidly Equipped Fast I Jfe
Train Daily feetwe lj
Ogden and Denver C
Via Three Separate asd III
Distkci Scemic Rotttea. w
THROUGH PULLMAN AND
ORDINARY SLEEPING
CARS, DENVER, OMAHA,
KANSAS CITY, ST. LOUIS
AND CHICAGO WITHOUT
CHANGE. FREE RECLIN-
ING CHAIR CARS. - - -H
Personally Conducted Excvr-
siona.
DINING CAKI, SERVICE
A LA CARTE ON ALL
THROUGH TRAINS.
H For rates, folders, free Was-
H trated booklets, etc, inquire o!
H your nearest ticket agent, spsci-
H tying the Rio Grande Route, or
M address
I 1. A. BENTOM,
G. A. P. D lait Lake City. I
I I A FARM TELEPHONE I
j M Will save enough horseflesh W
C nnd time every month to pay m
its cost for a year, and in g
emergencies, when time is M
the big thing, it may save B
1 your home nnd your life.
H Thousands of farms in this W
M country are now equipped m
m with telephones and you C
m could not persuade one of M
m these farmers who has prov- M
H ed its value to allow his tele-
' phone to be removed. m
H It helps to make farm life m
m pleasant and saves money.
m I I You owe it to yourself to
1 have a telephone on YOUR m
H n farm. Call on the nearest m
1 manager of the Rocky Moun-
m M tain Bell Telephone Com- (
M pany and he will tell you J
I how you oan get it at small J
H cost, or address the General
B Contract Agent, Rocky W
H Mountain Bell Telephone
m Company, Salt Lake City. I
I ' ; Rocky Mountain Bell. 1
I Telephone Co. 1
H
DR. W. H. STROTHER, O. D.
Authority on Eye Troubles
Broken Lenses Duplicated By Mail
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
Call, or Write to Me if Your Eyes
Trouble You.
Examination and Consultation Free
W i t h C. E. W. BOWERS, Jeweler
73 Main St, Salt Lake City
He Who Travels I
VIA THE' 1
PASSES THROUGH THE I
BEST DRY FARMING
DISTRICTS IN UTAH 1
AND NEVADA. 1
1 FOR INFORMATION RE- 1
GARDING RATES AND 1
J ; LAND WRITE OR CALL f
ON f
, J. H. BURTNER, D. P. A. I
z6f Main St, Salt Lake City. I
OFFICIAL DIRECTORY
UTAH BEE-KEEPERS'
ASSOCIATION.
President, E. S. Lovcsy,
355 Sixth East Street, Salt Lake City
First Vice-President, R. T. Rhees,
View, Weber County.
'Second Vice-President, W. Belliston.
Nephi.
Secretary, A. Fawson, Grantsville
Asst. Sec'y, Jas. Ncilsen, Holliday.
County Vice-Presidents:
Salt Lake W. C. Bergon, Mill Creek.
Utah George Hone, Payson
Wasatch J. A. Smith, Heber City.
Davis H. J. Butcher, KaysvHle.
Box Elder J Hansen, Bear River City
Juab. Thomas Belliston, Nephi.
Washington J. L. Bunting, St George
Cache Nephi Miller, Providence.
Morgan T. R. G. Welch, Morgan.
Emery Chris Ottoson, Huntington
Carbon. W. H. Horslcy, Price.
Sevier R. A. Lowe, Austin.
Sanpete Valter Cox, Fairvievr.
Weber Mrs R. T. Rhees, Viev
DeBouzek-Huntze H
Engravers and Electrotypes
Successors to
DE BOUZEK ENG. CO.,
37-29 W. South Temple St
SALT LAKE CITY
. .
ENTOMOLOGY 1
Edited by Prof. E. G. Titus, State
Agricultural College,
If you do not find here what you
want to know, write for it.
WHAT IS AN INSECT?
E. G. Titus.
Someone recently asked me why I
did not tell the Dcscrct Farmer read
ers "what an insect was." According
to fhc definition we usually use, an in
sect is any animal possessing a body
composed of thr.ee parts, the head,
the thorax and the abdomen, six legs
and usually one or two pairs of
wings. The legs arc fastened to the
under side of the thorax and the
wings to the upper side. Anyone can
get a good idea of an insect in its
full grown or -adult stage by axamin
ing a grasshopper (one that can fly);
a butterfly, or one of those moths that
come in the house at night attracted
by the lights; a beetle, one of the
hard winged insects that also come
to light in the house in the early
spring; and the true bug, that is the
squash bug, or an aphid (plant-louse).
While each of these bugs have the
parts slightly different, you will no
tice at thtt same time that they arc
decidedly similar.
The younger stages of insects arc
not quite so easy to separate into
groups. But with the grasshopper,
the squash bug and cabbage aphis the
younger stages appear very much like
the' adult insect. While man)' other
insects appear decidedly unlike their
parents the caterpillars, young bocs
and wircworms.
There is a way of classifying in
sects according to their manner of
feeding which everyone will find of
value. All insects, with some very
rare exceptions arc cither biting in
sects or sucking insects. There is
one very large group of insects which
have biting and sucking mouth parts;
this is the group to which belong the
honey bee, the wasp, the ants and
such things. In the class known as
biting insects come the grasshoppers,
the caterpillars, which are the younger
stages of the butterflies or the moths,
and all of the beetles. The butterflies
and moths are themselves sucking in
sects. The principal .sucking insects
with which we are ordinarily bothered
are the squash bugs, the aphids, such
.13 the green aphis and the cabbage
aphis, the bed-bug, the mosquitoes i
J
and some of the flics. While the
mouth parts of all the flics arc fitted
for sucking not all arc fitted to pierce
through the skin of cither plants or IS
animals. The ordinary housefly get';
its food by a way that is usually '
called "lapping it up." while the mos- I
quito is possessed of a pair of saws '1
in its mouth with which it cuts a min-
utc hole in the skin and pushes its
i
sucking- tube through, using it as a
pump to extract blood if it is feeding
on an animal, and sap if it is feeding
on a plant. It will be noticed in the j
above that most of the insects re-
fcrrcd to arc adults. There arc a i
number of our injurious and bencfi-
cial species that do their best or their
worst work in their younger stages. ';
It will be well now to tell some-
thing about the younger stages of the
insects. Most of them hatch from
an egg. But there arc some very rad
ical exceptions. The female of the
San Jose scale never lays eggs, the
young always being produced alive.
The .same is true of many of the
aphids, and with many of the other
aphids eggs arc produced but once a
year, while all the rest of the year the
females, often called "stcm-miothcrs"
produce living young of the female
sex only.
What is known as the larval stage
of the insects is that part of their life
from the time they lta.tch from the
egg or are born until they become
adults or pass into a resting stage
known as the pupal stage from which
the adult later issues.
This takes us 'back to another form I
of classification which was mentioned j
above, those insects which have more
or less of the appearance of the adult 1
throughout the younger stages, such
as .the cabbage aphis and those in
sects which arc so totally different
in their young stages that they arc
often considered to have no relation
to the grown insect. Among those
familiar to all of you arc the cater
pillar which turns into a butterfly or
moth, the wire-worm which later be
comes the snapping-beetle and white
grub which makes the uiny-beetle or ;
the June-beetles.
We will have some more about the .
insects, their relations and habits
some other time, if you wish it.

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