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Deseret farmer. [volume] (Provo, Utah) 1904-1912, September 12, 1908, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010218520/1908-09-12/ed-1/seq-2/

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a THE DBSERliT FARMESt . Saturday, September , ,94
I JHOOSIER DRILLS
RUNNER PRESSURE WHEEL I
BISG PRESSURE WHEEL PLAIN DISC
PLAIN DISC if ith GANG WHEEL ATTACHED
SHOE DRILLS PIN HOE DRILLS '
m We have any of the abovt styles ' ,
I J MILLER-CAHOON CO.
M M Pioneer Implement Dealers
H I L. C. MILLER, Gen'l Mgr. MURItAY, UTAH I
I YOU CAN I R RIG A TE ffiB I
I JSk YOUR UP-LANDS WITH AN
NO need to go up stream and And the cost of running Is always
construct miles and miles of less than the cost of keeping the
h ditch to get the water high ditch clean of drifting sand, silt,
m enough. weeds and fast growing bushes.
H Place one of the powerful I. H. C. In many cases, an I. K. C. cngino
H gasoline engines on the stream where enables you to reach the knolls and
M it is nearest your land. Thero aro other hig places which you cannot
H large engines for irrigating on a big reach at ill by ditch without ex-
H scale and smaller engines for small pensive ilumes that are "tumble-
H farms. down" and must be repaired every
H wl These engines are the best means spring.
m j for raising and utilizing the under- Tll engines aro made both vorti-
H flow; also for raising water from cal aud horizontal and in many sizes
m lakes, ponds, and wells, and also from 1 to 20-horse power. They are
M running streams. easily controlled and run depend-
They will rais ill the water you ablv Tho irrigator does not need
H need and deliver t just where you t0 K VQ them constant attention.
want it in the d.ich or in laterals i?tlV an occnslonolroturn to them, to ro-
nuuuk u w.v. .iwj ui m mituiib. plonlsh tho fuel and wator Bupply, 1b nil
M The first cost of oneof thesel.H.C. Wa ,s neccssniy. Ono man enn handlo
gasoline engines is, in almost MmllJ
H every case, less than the building of International local njrents will furnish
H a long ditch to enable the water to pnlKB nnd clvo particulars on all sizes of
flow naturally to the land, bmnc omB no0, 0r wr,t0 tho noarost
WESTERN GENERAL AGENCIES: Denver. Colo.. Portland. Ore. Salt Lake City, Utah. I
H Helena. Mont.. Spokane, WaiK., San Francwco. Cal. 1
t INTERNATIONAL HARVrtER COMPANY OF AMERICA? Chicago. V.S. A. J
B ' (Incorporated) m
fVORICULTURE
,
THE PASSING OF THE RANCH
AND TWO RANCHING
DISTRICTS.
J. A. W. :
Written for the Dcscrct Farmer.
The ranch has come to mean a live
stock farm somewhat far removed
from centers of population, which de
pends very largely on the adjoining
public range for winter feeding, and
on the hay raised on the farm for
winter feeding. Tho methods of
farming on the ranches hove usually
bocn of the. most primitive kind. The
isucccss of a ranch frequently has rest
ed more on the accessibility of a rich
grass range, than on the intelligent
skill employed in its operation. It
lias 'been emphatically, extensive
farming, wastcfully conducted.
As the country has become more
thickly settled, the ranches have be
come smaller and less numerous. The
greater acre profit to be realized from
systematic farming lias compelled
many ranchers to sell out or adopt
better methods. Moreover, with the
contraction of the public domain, the
public range,- which has been the main
dependence of the ranches, arc being
used more and more as accessories to
the neighboring farming districts. Ui-
timatcly, the ranch will rarely be
found in places of soil and climatic
conditions favorable to more inten
sive agriculture. It will of necessity
be confined to mountainous districts,
of short seasons, and adjoining large
areas of mountain ranges. However,
the sparse population of the West yet
makes it possible, and will make it
possible for a generation or more,
for ranches, very much of the early
type to exist and to prosper.
To a person who desires to vieW the
ranch with its characteristic life, and
to study the methods employed, few
places are more interesting than
Grand Valley, Idaho. This valley be
gins a few miles from the Grand can
yon of the Snake river and continues
to the upper end cf Swan Valley.
The valley is little more than ai brorfd '
canyon, through -which the river
flows. The ranches completely fill
the arable area. Timothy is the
standard hay crop. Occasionally the
native grasses, fenced in, are made
into hay. Once in a while a field of
oats is encountered. The oat tic (and
the ranches arc all cattle ranches)
range the hills in the summer, and in
the fall come in to cat the hay atvl 1'
the snow which lies several months m
in the valley. At nearly all the jff
ranches butter is made, but chiefly I
for home use. It commands only M
about 15 cents -per pound, since the 1
outside market insists upon creamery 1
butter. Eggs and poultry arc pro- 1
duccd, but sold on the ranches at 1
ridiculously low prices. There would
seem Jo be an excellent opportunity 1
for improvement in the methods used J
by these ranchers. However, farming M
from a horse's back seems to have a M
special charm that often unfits a per- M
son for more systematic and detailed j
work. The beauty of a drive through 9
Grand Valley, Idaho, fully rccom- Ij
penecs for the trouble taken. II j
Ranphing of a still more primitive 1
type may be viewed in Jackson's ij
Hole, Wyoming. The valley lies cast !
of the grand Tctons, and is adjacent i
to immense grazing "areas. The small
population, not above a thousand
souls ;itlc long distance to railroads,
fifty to one hundred and fifty miles;
and ' the loiigv. winter, usually from j
four to six months of snow, combine
to make farming in the district of the ij
simplest kind. Timothy is raised' in jj
fair abundance; oats may be grown II
thcic; root crops do well, and the 1
cattle fed on the thousand hills are I
slick and fat. The difficulty of the J
short season the most formidable, j
This might be overcome in a large I
measure by growing fall sown cer- f
cals. Fall oats had never been heard
of by the farmers who were met. s
Tt was almost amusing to learn' of
the anxiety of Jackson's Hole farm
ers concerning new itrigation canals,
in order to get more writer on the
land. Smke river flows through the
valley, and the numerous fair-sized
creeks flowing into the river. The
only question before the irrigation
farmier is to dig ccmals in which to
carry the water. A little fall plowing
.and more systematic methods would
probably make irrigation wholly un
necessary in Jackson's Hole, where
the snow lies five feet deep, and there
arc ample fall and spring rains. It
seems impossible to predict a time
when the farmers of the West will
consent to use water economically-
j

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