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Deseret farmer. [volume] (Provo, Utah) 1904-1912, September 12, 1908, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010218520/1908-09-12/ed-1/seq-6/

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I 0 T HI DESERET FARMER Saturday, September 12, 1908
I THE BEST LINIMENT
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IT HAS NO EQUAL I
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doWibllli " OTTO A. BfcTER.
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quloklr lucartaln our opinion fre whether an
Intention U probably pntontabtn. Oommunlrv
H llontBtr Icily conOdontlnl. HANOftOW on I'ntcnt
tent f roe. O I dost opener for aecurinfrpatentJi.
fl I'ntonta takon through Mtmn A Co. rocolre
H tprclaJ node, without charge, lu the
Scientific American.
TaTf AhandBomoly Ulnntrnlfld wookly. Largest clr-
fl dilation of any clontlUo Journal. Tor mi, 1 a
year: four month, L Bold by all tiewsdenlora
WUNN& Co" " Hew York
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ATTACHED INSTANTANEOUSLY
m Nama and Address. Numbarad If Dasirad.
V LEG RANDS for Poultry, Plgaana, Tuikaya
H SALT LAKE STAMP CO. Salt Lakt, Utah.
- if YOU'VE '
lfeL- I NEVER VfORN
vw SlfcPaSr H
VSLICRER
(I . KR v N Lto team ttte bodily
k VsN U comfort H gives hi
1 lJ MhVreHestweathr
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(Irtll 111 GUARANTEED
Mflfrkl III WATERPROOF
All 1 i 3Cffl
C3 11 I ATAUC0QD5T05
.j-.J-' CATALOG FREE
k?JF AJT0ttaBOTOM.UlA.
'" fSa'TowisCAIUUAMtaUHITID.TOfOKro.CM
, GO WEST
AND SEE WHAT 1
IDAHO INVITES YOU I
, " f
' to share as an irrigation J
stale; the best watered state V
in the Union.
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! HOMES FOR THOU- f
' ANDS OF SETTLERS I
M
1 GOOD LAND f
GOOD WATER 1
GOOD CLIMATE I
GOOD PEOPLE f
Go to the Golden West M
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' For Rates and Descriptive
Literature, Address
1 D. E. BURLEY, G. P. A. I
; D. S. SPENCER, A. G. P. A. M
0RE60N SHORT LINE I
RAILROAD I
COMPANY I
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH I
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I I EXCELSIOR STOCK FARM a'
H' J. R. ALLEN & BROS., Proprietors
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Breeders and Importers of Percheron Horses, Short Horn Cattle
Hp aild Cotswold Sheep. We now offer the trade i,ooo, ioo to iso-lb. Ram
B' Lambs; 300, 200-lb yearling Rams; 500 Ewes. All pure-bredl Cotswold,
Hi all in the very best condition. Our Cotswolds lead the world; one of
H I oiir Rams, bred and reared as they are, is worth three brought dn from
Canada or the East. Flock headers a specialty.
WE .HANDLE GOOD STUEJE .QNLtY.v .... K ,
i DAIRYING i I
THE DAIRY COW ON THE
FARM.
By Joseph Ririe Ogden
t?
To"" the Editor of- The Dcscrct
Farmer:
In traveling around these beautiful
and fertile valleys observing the large
farms, the good crops of hay, fruit,
, grain, beets, potatoes, etc., noticing
that neighbors arc one-half to one
mile apart in many parts, and seeing
the weeds growing so abundantly on
the ditch banks and roadsides that it
, seems as if ten per cent of our farms
arc weeds, we are imprcscd with the
fact that we arc land poor.
The farmer who works hard trying
to care for so much year after year,
cropping his land, selling all off and
putting nothing back on, will, in a
few years, find that not only he, him
self, has played out but that his land
will run down also.
And when he pays the expenses
necessary upon our irrigated farms,
besides taxes, hired help, and wear
and tear of implements, he must not
allow himself very large wages, or
he will be in debt at the end of the
your.
If our farms were quartered1 and
four families placed where now there
is but one, with eight to twelve dairy
cows kept by each, our returns would
be greater and our " work lighter.
At one of our experiment stations
they have kept a record of a herd of
twenty-seven ofdinary cows for ten
years. The average was 6,513 pounds
of milk per year, making 336 pounds
of ibuttcr. We have some in this
community that will produce nearly
os much. This is about 2 gallons
per pay for ten months, and 332
pounds at 25 cents (which is an aver
age for butter for the last year)
would bring us $83. We figure our
expense as follows: Five tons of
hay, at $5 per ton, $25; six rnionths'
pasturage, at $1 per month, $6;" allow
$12 per year for labor. (Tn the east
they arc willing to take skim milk
and the fertilizer for the labor). The
total would be $43, leaving a net
balance of $40, besides a good! calf
and the skim milk, which, for feed
ing calves, hogs and poultry, they
value as worth 25 cents a hundred.
1 If we feed a little grain, I "think-
our returns would be large enough n
to offset the cost of the grain. 1
Where can we find a better invest- 1
meat than a good cow, if .she brings 1
us from 50 to 100 per cent iprofit 1
yearly? I
You who are familiar with condi- I
tions in the old countries, where land
is worth ten times what it is here
and no better markets, know they arc
getting rich with cows.
In Denmark and Holland, .close to
the large cities, where land is worth
from one to two thousand dollars
per acre, you find the dairy cow ev
erywhere. But there the farmer not
.only keeps good cows, he cares for
them. He feeds and waters and salts
them well. He grooms and stables
them. He docs not allow a dog
around, nor an unkind word spoken
to his cows, and they appreciate
his treatment by filling the milk pail
two, and some three times a day.
A few weeks ago I was impressed,
on visiting a farmer in Utah, who in
vited mc to go down to the pasture
and sec his cows. When we entered
the gate the cows were a quarter cf
a mile away. Hlo called two or three
by name and his entire herd of twelve
came up to., him. Fie patted them,
went around rubbing them, talked as
kindly to them as to his children, and
they heard his voice and1 followed,
him.
He showed mc his returns for the
past year, and he had received in
cash from $110 to $160 -each month,
besides feeding a nice lot of hogs and
poultry. His cows were mixed Jer
seys and Guernseys. Three were
pure-breds. He said they averaged
$7 per head. ITc fed .them bran and
malt, kept an account of his expens
es, and declared his cows paid, $45
per head clear. What one cat do
others can. He said: "I have thirty
acres of land, a good orchard, good
house, good barn and sheds.' I jiavc
-a family of eight children, aridi we
take life easy. Wc have plenty to do
and arc happy. My boys and irls
need not go away from home' fpr
work to get spending money. We
have money in the bank, nevcrj run
in debt for anything, and our (ows
re doing it all." '
Wc cannot afford to keep our cows
on poor, dry pastures in the summer
and leave them' out in the open yards
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