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Deseret farmer. [volume] (Provo, Utah) 1904-1912, October 10, 1908, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010218520/1908-10-10/ed-1/seq-2/

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H -2 THE DESERET FARMER Saturday, October I0) I9o8, 1
LH TTOT? 5ATF np tt?aqt? t?m,r If tllcrc s anything the matter with.
H FOR SALE OR LEASE,Four your horses or stock use
H IT r "Si uTtn f landtiD w- B- Cfiapma ' LINIMENT
H EST HUn,y' UV?0fd gra2ln! F Man or Beast. If it does not
H Imd, partly fenced. Fair house and Cure when all fails, don't pay
H sheds. Address for it. Get your money back.
H Utah implement -vehicle -mt all druggists
H COMPANY, Wholesale by
M Salt Lake City, Utah. W. A. NELDEN DRUG CO.
1 Salt Lake City.
I Hlpr CLEAN GRAIN O
H aDillWJil PRICE QUESTION
H . JlK' iMErlE: not mnrct Vur R"!n undcaned.
H iAbLHI mmSk ' Wi" rinR a tcttCr p"cc if Jt 'S thor" b
H :m LET THE CL,pPER Dp THE W0RK
H The "CLIPPER" cleaner and fanner is especially adapted to tl cleaning and
M g rading of aH kinds of grain. If it can be cleaned the "CLIPPER" will do it.
CLEANED GRAIN BRINGS BETTER PRICES
jH Write for complete booklet and descriptive matter, telling of its many uses.
THE BARTELDES SEED CO., General Agents
DENVER, COLORADO
THREE CAR LOADS OF REO AUTOMOBILES
H SHIPPED OUR COUNTRY TERRITORY IN MAY
H WHO WILL BE THE NEXT B8B&$tf5?
H TO SHOW WISDOM ALONG jBmjAAi
THESE LINES, TO SHOW FHmSralP
APPRECIATION OF MOD (Wli
ERN UP-TO-DATE METH- ffiVwil'
REMEMBER A REO AUTOMOBILE
CAN BE USED FOR A GREAT MANY PURPOSES TO YOUR
ADVANTAGE.
WRITE AND ASK US ABOUT THIS.
SHARMAN AUTOMOBILE 0.
iQ9-"x W. So. Temple Street. SALT L &E CITY, UTAH
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I The FAMOUS' DANIELSEN DISC PLOW
It plows any width or any depth.
It i simple, strong, and easy to operate.
It is the only disc plow under complete control.
OUR MACHINERY IS FULLY GUARANTEED
I Danielsen Plow Co.
Bell Phone 3101
210 S. 6th West, St. SALT LAKE CITY
I WHITE FOR. CATALOGUE
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agriculture"! 1
, .M - H
Edited by Prof. Robert Stewart, Ag
ricultural . College of Utah.
CHEMICAL PROBLEMS. ,
Soil Fertility a Fundamental Question
The question of soil fertility is a
fundamental one and is of far more
importance than is commonly sup
posed. The department of agricul
tural extension of the Iowa State Col
lege believes, that one or more of the
following topics should occupy -a
prominent place upon the program of
every Farmers' Institute in the Stare
of Iowa:
i. Methods of maintaining the fer
tility of Iowa soils.
2. Plant food What is it, where
it comes from, and whore it goes.
3. Farm manures How best pre
served and applied.
4. Crop rotation 'What it can and
cannot accomplish.
5. Soil drainage and the problems
arising after the land is drained.
6. Preparation of the secd-bed and
methods of cultivation.
7. Soil experiments in Towa; the
lessons which they teach Iowa far
mers. Population is increasing rapidly and
every acre must feed more people.
There arc no longer vast areas of fer
tile prairie which the government can
open up at a few cents per -acre, which
will in a few years and with but little
expenditure become exceedingly pro
ductive and valuable. "Westward the
course of empire takes its way" was
a good motto for our forefathers, but
it is useless for us. Not only our
sc.lves, but our children and our chil
dren's children must obtain their live
lihood from the toil which we now -'
cultivate. They -cannot become weal
thy by rapid increase in the value of
land as has been the case with the
average well-to-do farmer of the pres
ent day. Now i the crucinl time in
the agriculture of Iowa. The eastern
states arc already compelled to ex
pend millions of dollars every year
for plant-food a l unless a radical
change is made -from the wasteful
practigc npw. Employed in , Iowa the
day of commercial fertilisers is near
er at hand than we think. The soils
of Towa are new j.nd have been under
cult'vation but comparatively few
years. For centuries Nature has teen
storing up fertility in these soils for V
the use of man. But, notwithstanding
their great native fertility, it cannot .1
be too strongly emphasized iliat Jfl
wasteful methods may 4ji -a few jrars 1
greatly reduce the productive capacity x
of Iowa soils, for tlKind is no soil so m
fertile that its producing power ran- M
not be rapidly decreased by wasteful I
methods. This fact is so clearly M
shown' by the history of older states fl
a little further cast'lhaiTits truth can-
not be questioned. In; '"Ohio, Indiana W
and iilindis, large portions of which M
' arc covered with gIaiaLdrift, in many W
respects rcscmb'ling thfc glacial drift M
which forms a large area of Iowa, :M
vast sums arc now expended annually JS
for commercial fertilizers. The fm
twelfth census estimates that in 1899 M
Ohio spent $2,695,470 for commercial g
fertilizers; Indiana spent $1,553,710; :M
and Illinois spent $830,660. Later data M
is" not available, but it -is known that m
the amount expended 5has increased 8a
rapidly during the- past seven yenrs. Jj
.Thus, wc sec that in Illinois, our ij
nearest neighbor, the commercial for- m
tilizcr man has gained a strong foot- j
hold and is even now knocking at the J ,
door of our own state.
A ton of the average soil of Iowa
contains less than four pounds of ac- i
tual fertility or plant food. The re- 1
maindcr is simply, -wastf material and I
cannot be used by plants -as food. I
When this fertility lias once been 1
exhausted, remember that it is gone J
fo'rever and will not return to our soil M
except as it is piirchasctf in one form W
or another, mostly ?is high priced W
commercial fertilizers. It is cither M
commercial fertilizers for' Iowa in the M
future or else there must be more :
clover, more stock,, better care of ma-
mire and a more systematic rotation "f 'f
crops. There is no escape from thc-c j
fwts. Which-shall it be? Let us nt , 1 ;
become merely soil rdbbers. Let each
of us now while it is not yet too lat
adopt those methods which will eu
blc us to turn our farm over to otr
children not less but more productive
than when we received them; then
also let us do what we 'can to estab 1
lh the bettor .metjiadsm the whole
community. " (
The value, preservation and appli
cation of farm manures deserve spec
ial emphasis. There is probably ;
material on the tarms of Iowa vhosc j

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