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Deseret farmer. [volume] (Provo, Utah) 1904-1912, October 10, 1908, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010218520/1908-10-10/ed-1/seq-6/

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I THI DOIRII TAKMIR SATURDAY, OCTOBER ,,, I9o.
1 ITOWER'S FISH BRAND
WATERPROOF l
OILED CLOTHING,
H looks better -wears kn9er-YJ
and gives more trslX JJ
bodrfy comfort rrf M
because cur on JiyM
large patterns, yet AJ?" fv
costs no more than tkT x
the just os oxodJklfdsov
SUIIS1389SUtKER$13??k
SOLD EVERYWHERE SBf- V
EvfrormenJ rffjWEjfa ,JW V
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H ufonei yUM-id i---"
' A J TOWCB CO BOSTON U 4 A
TQwfO CAAQ'AN CO tlW'TCO TOQOMtQ CAN
BBS
I FOR SALE
I Boiwtll Winter Oati.
I Bttvwell Winter Barley.
I Write for particular!
I STEPHEN BOSWELL
I 5EPHI . UTAH
I THE HONEY-SAVING FENCE
I tbo ono buii. LouKlit at tho right price, k( voyou tlio
EH-mmfmS I lt MfrVll'C, Ift.t till! loHtf
L t L, C4t, cause you no trouli u.
.-IJ4 N!TM. FKLB AM
m 4-444 HM FEME
BBJ . Wi-XJ-j In Jimt tlmt kind llmle of
rtT j g'"l'Mf; III H y. M tllIO WlfT. UN III-
p -i - ,,,rr.i m.ii! u roiniwrnblolockclON)imiii,
H . KH DlrOtlK KM It hlOIIO Ml.
BVJ BINfiFKM UHMANF.1"" Hy fciipo until on
H IVMrUin I llUJnAIlL '" written iih nlmiit f,l
E.... t-B . niHlonrltiuiucrHarliWIrtt
BBl .,. T ' ' " heavy, Dlnxlo wirn with
H KVfltVlNfi I RAW Wltf ,oUr' K,rl'- tpii iih wimt
H rn.rvn.rimi I UiaU mud. hud ninlri ntnl un will
BB iimiin j on ilellrcri-d price.
BeKALB FENCE CO. BeKalb.IM. Kass City. M.
H Have Your
. HARNESS, BUGGY TOPS
, AND CARRIAGES
Hi Dressed with
Hi W. B CHAPMAN'S
HARNESS AND CARRIAGE
V DRE88IN6
H Guaranteed to Preserve Leather and
H Make it Look Like New.
Whocsale and Retail by
Z. C. M. I., Salt Lake City.
THE BEST LINIMENT
m rm wuei m. thc iwmjui nit
gm Qombault's a
Caustic Balsam
IT HAS NO EQUAL
Ftr i;".te?.nd Pertly
hMtlBf, fend for all Old an4
INI Wound i, riom R4tM ltmy
EiWrlor Cucn,BolIi
IIumaam Corn ABd
SSBftow. Throa
itdyrir.tfv ChMt c.w
MMMBas Baekaaha
We wmW tty k ti Nauralflia
Mt Mtthi a MrHch SHralns
Hd ttriltre m Iwoii irm
(MrtMH ifM Mt ex- Lumbago
I KM) KM . PirtitlMt. nt LiL..1a
HHKtufti wwlwe Drphlneria
MMf tM tf tfcr!c Car a Lunai
mi m My mm tot Rheumatism
rnket m tvtmHrrf antj
aaBJJB.'1 H aHtWJolnt
RfMeVES TN SMENCtS-STKEJMTNCMC MWCLES
Cornhlll, Tr. "0d bottl OmumtlaMtAtatm
tnr rhumAllitn mot food II30.M PjM hi
doctor' bllli " . OTTO A. 8LYr,K.
1'rle t .t0 pr KoHl. Sold br AtinU,t
brttixprM)trptld. Writ for Hookltt R.
TtM UWtCNCE-WMJJAMI CMirMtT. ClettHi4. tt.
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I HUO aamp0 FreTlBHiin
ATTACHED INSTANTANEOUSLY
Nnmi and AdtJrttt. Numbxrtl If DMlrtHl.
LQ lANDS ttWutrv,Ptn; Turkeys
ALT LAKK STAMP 66. lt LK Utah.
BIG BARGAINS in Registered
Duroc Jersey Swine. Remember I
am the State' Pioneer Breeder zmd
will pay express.
F. R. PEART. Cornlsk, Utah.
FOR SALE.
Registered Duroc Jersey Swfee.
For information, write or phose
CALVIN WHEELER.
Collinetofi - - Utah
A BA BB A I N !
A pair of Registered Jerseys, Bull
and Heifer, for $105.00. They are
beauties.
JOSEPH BARKER,
Ogden, Utah, R. D. No. 3
1 EXCELSIOR STOCK FARM XB&
J. R. ALLEN &- BROS., Proprietors
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H Breeders and Importers of Pcrcheron Horses, Short Horn Cattle
H and Cotswold Sheep. We now offer the trade 1,000, 100 to 150-lb. Ram
Lambs; 300, 200-lb yearling Rams; 500 Ewes. All pure-bred Gotswold,
.ill in the very best condition. Our Cotswolds lead the world; one of
our Rams, bred and reared as they are, is worth three brought in from
Canada or the East. Flock headers a specialty.
WE HANDLE GOOD STUFF ONLY.
m ' " "
BB
1
livestock!
UNSOUNDNESS IN HORSES.
From "Thc Care of Animals" by S.
Mayo, a Noted Veterinarian.
A horse is considered practically
sound when it possesses no disease,
deformity or vice that will interfere
with its general or special usefulness.
Soundness is important, not only to
those who deal in horses, but to those
who raise and own them, because its
soundness, together with the general
appearance of thc animal, indicates
its relative commercial value. A per
son who contemplates purchasing a
horse, if he is not thoroughly famil
iar with thc subject, will usually find
it a matter of economy to employ an
expert to assist in the selection, or
he will purchase of some well-known
dealer whose judgment and whose
"word" arc worthy of dependence.
Thc ordinary individual is likely to
pride himself upon his ability to judge
horses and to determine their sound
ness or unsoundness; and. yet there
is probably no one .experience in
which individuals arc more likely to
be 'deceived than in this. Horse deal
ers of wide experience usually make
allowances in their judgment of a
horse for defects which cannot be de
termined by an ordinary -examination,
but arc likely to show themselves
only after a thorough acquaintance
with thc animal. As a general thing,
thc purchaser sees a horse- at its very
best, as regards appearance, condi
tion, speed and freedom from defects
and vices, and should take this into
account in .estimating thc value of
thc animal. In examining animals as
to their soundness, experienced judg
es, do not allow themselves to be mis
led, or their attention to be distract
ed from any part of thc animal, cith
er by thc owner or by ibystandcrs.
An excellent judge of horses once
said, "If the owner or a bystander
calls "my attention to a possible de
fect about thc horse's head, I always
make it ,i point to give the opposite
extremity a most thorough exami
nation." It is a trick frequently re
sorted to by unscrupulous dealers to
call a mon's attention to a part he
knows to be sound in order to at
tract his attention from an ijkl
neiS in another part. In oonspg
statements made by horse dealers,
special care should be given not only
to the statement, but to thc reasons
why thc statement is made.
When possible, it is always a good
plan to examine horses in thc stable ;
under their ordinary conditions, then
to take them out where thc light and
other conditions arc favorable and go
over thoroughly every part of thc
horse until one is satisfied of its free
dom fromi unsoundness.
After thoroughly manipulating ev
ery part, thc horse should be tested
in his paces for any defect in locomo
tion or breathing, and afterwards he 1
should be tested as to his ability to
cat and drink normally. In examining 1
horses for soundness, it is generally
assumed that thc horse has every de
fect, deformity and vice that horse
flesh is heir to, and thc presence of
.I'b'scncc of these defects is demon- 1
s'ratcd by thorough examinations and 1
tests.
Warranty.
A person that warrants -a horse
sound', cither by a written or verbal ,
warranty, renders himself liable, and
thc purchaser can recover damages
sustained. Persons in selling horses
should exercise care in warranting a v
horse sound, cither directly or by
thc use of language that implies a ,
warranty; for if thc purchaser takes
thc horse on thc strength of such
representations and thc horse proves
to be unsound thc seller is himself
responsible. A distinction is usually
made bctvech those cases in which
a purchaser buys the horse on thc
strength of thc representations made
by the owner, and those cases in
which thc purchaser assumes to know
about thc horse, and buys on his own
judgment and responsibility. It is
usually economy to purchase of a. re
liable person and, if possible, on a !
trial of a week or more. Whether j
justly or not, it has come to be pro- W
vcrbial that lite horse trader is B
"tricky."
Examination of Horse in Stable. K
In examining thc horse in the 1
stable, do' not disturb him at first, I
but watch him closely for a few mo- I
ments; he will be likely soon to show I
any stable vices that he may possess.
Among vices to be looked for is I
"weaving," a habit which horses have I
of swinging1 the head or body froim t
side to side, often for an hour at a 1
)

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