OCR Interpretation


Deseret farmer. [volume] (Provo, Utah) 1904-1912, October 10, 1908, Image 9

Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010218520/1908-10-10/ed-1/seq-9/

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1 SATURDAY, OCTOBER i0 1908. T HJ-D ES E B E ft A-R M E R- , .r,,,,, ypjgg I
I cows arc hrce: From the food she
1 cats she must maintain her physical
1 wcllbeing; nourish and, develop her
i unborn; and generally furnish milk
I for her master. What la wonderful
creature is the good cow.
ut assuming that the calf has been
bred right and has been strongly
iborn, it then passes into the hands of
the breeder to carry on the work.
"All flesh is grass," it has been writ
ten. After being well-born all the
calf-hcifcr-cow needs is care and
feed. At this stage oomes in the
necessity of wisdom and "patience.
All" good looking calves do not make
; good cows. Dairy progress is not bc-
fl wildcringly rapid and often the way
of the progrcssor is hard.
I It is supposed this calf carries the
dairy type inheritance from its sire.
In the sire, the type was established
and encouraged, largely by environ
ment and feed, and these two forces
must be operative in encouraging a
proper development of the dairy tcn
1 dency in the offspring. Consequently
I the calf and the heifer must be fed
r with the dairy type in view. One
popular conception of the 'dairy type
I is a thin skin drawn over the skeleton
I of a cow, but I say unto you, no man
1 tf has ever yet starved dairy qualities
LI. into a calf or a cow, and it is not
fll
pi worth the beginner's while to make
the experiment. But many a. good
, cow has been st-arved into mediocrity
by the stinginess or ignorance of her
feeder. In the matter of a little more
ife or less fat on the heifer or cow I may
F
I quote "Better the excess than the
I deficiency."
I It is well to remember that the
i same character of feed that 'will en
courage the cow into well doing as a
milker is the kind that will develop
I the heifer into a cow.
A's I have said, if she is- big enough
' ' to become a mother, at 2 years or less
of age, have her bred ibaok to her own
Strong sire. Then in feeding the prcg-
nant dairy heifer remember she must
I make growth, also, and withhold not
I fife: abundant and well-formed ration.
1 At this time remember, further, that
f tfiis young thing is performing one of
Rc most wonderful and beautiful
t , marvels of the universe working out
' fjlie design of maternity taking on
- hc obligations of motherhood, and
4 $le 's m yr hands, where I will
' leave her and wish you both well.
f Hoards DaTryman.
The Elgin Dairy, Salt Lake City,
pays the highest market price for
cream at all times and gives absolute
ly the correct test. We offer no
premiums, for any farmer knows they
pay the premium in the long run. We
are doing an honest, legitimate busi
ness and want your cream. Send
your cream in Red oans and we will
send you pay for all the cream de
livered. '
ELGIN DAIRY CO.
PARTISAN DEBATE.
"Taft a statcsmanl" sneered the
Democrat. "Why, he hasn't the first
requisite.
"You arc showing your ignorance,"
rcpliqd the Republican, hotly. "Why
do you say that for?"
"Because it's true. "Where's the
log cabin in which he was befrn? fTcli
me that! Statcsmanl" Philadelphia
lcdcr.
-Thc humblc'Indianapolis machinist
who was fined-$1500 for violation of'
the antitrust laws has been dispos
sessed of his home in order that the
fine might be collected. The Stand
ard Oil Company has not yet paid is
fine. The Commoner.
Vested interests andIpov
- ertyJ -
Whenever the majority of the peo
ple seem to have a chance of getting
favorable laws, the small minority,
the few that Senator LaFollcttc says
control the country, rise up and talk
about vested interests and property.
This time, however, it is used by the
Manufacturers' Association in a reso
lution passed at their recent meeting
in New York City. The resolution
says: "We have had excess agitation
under the guise of moral crusades,
such as child labor, railway reform
and similar movements, which are cx
ccllcnt and desirable in reasonable
measure, but not so when pressed to
the hazard of vested interests and
property." How the mind of any
man of the least enlightenment and
of even the vaguest morality could
have' evolved that resolution, -is ha1rP
to imagine. How a great national or-
gahization could stamp it with its
, approval is inconceivable. Butfin the
' " 5 u 1,
t records of the National Association
. 1? j8 L '
of Manufacturers stands that deplara
tioii of- the principle that child-labor
laws arc not excellent nor desirable,
"when pressed to the hazard of vested
interests and property." The Eastern
Dealer.
J ORIGINAL CONVERSATIONS. , H
One of, 'cm goes like this: "Yes, H
sir, that dog can do -anything but M
talk." H
"Well, it's wonderful the intclli- M
gence they have. Why, I had a fox- H
terrier once M
"And yet they say dogs can't rea- H
sonl Why, a friend o' mine--" H
"Tliat's right. You can't tell me" H
"And when he was killed, it was H
just lilce losing one of the family. M
My wife H
"Well, sir, I Ibelievc if there's ,1 H
hereafter for human bcing,s there's
one for dogs. I don't sec " H
"Here here I Come here, sirl
You brainless little muttl Have I H
got to lick you every day to tench
you to quit nosin' those scraps on the H
om,floor? Gorithccor.
ncr and lay down I" Puck.
I
"Come to -think of irait would b
1 hard fork William SWaldorf A'stor to H
J X"- . , - .. . H
do anything that would irritate this
'country-much," rsays" the Royal Rich-
mond Times-Dispatch. W-cll, sup-
pose he should decide to come back? H
Washington Herald.
I AWARDED FIRST PPEMIUM AT STATE FAIR. GOLD MEDAL BY STATE AGRICUL- 1
TURAL SOCIETY OF SACRAMENTO, CAL ALSO GOLD MEDAL AWARDED BY MID- f
WINTER FAIR, AND LB WIS AND CLARK EXPOSITION. PORTLAND, OREGON. f
A REVOLU- W&:- ZhnmiL - LUk i . BY 1UN- I
TION IN V rwK?i. ..rtfiSfflra " w YflKJuJ LIGHT BY
ducxd to V "L t mLJfJSSfmym BY NIGHT I
THK MON. KHHBJBJljisBJHJ THX WORK I
' ! From so to xoo Acres Plowed each day doinj the work much better than by animal power and at half 1
the exrnse per acre. More than two hundred m successful operation. Every one a uccewt.
The above illustration represents the Utah Arid Farm Company's STEAM PLOWING OUTHT J
at work on their farm at Nephi, Utah. This engine is plowing so acres Pr day oi hours at an
expense of So cents per acre. And it was also used by them to pull a 'BEST Steam Combined Har-
J . vester on the same farm and harvested an average of 6S acres per day, andat the nominal P gf
Socts. an acre. The grain was cut, threshed, recleaned and sacked I in one PSlNKD HARVESTER I M
The SUCCESS of DRY FARMING is THE STEAM PLOW AND COMBINED HARVIib-lLR H
For further information address . -.. ...... w fl
TlE.BEST MANUFACTURING CO., or THE G. T. IHGERSOLL MACHINERY C0;, I I
J BELL PHONE 1999 p. O. BOX 794 IND. PHONE 846 M fj
SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 321 DOOLY blk. SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH K M

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