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Deseret farmer. [volume] (Provo, Utah) 1904-1912, October 31, 1908, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010218520/1908-10-31/ed-1/seq-2/

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I 2 THE DESERET FARMER SATURDAY, OCTOBER a, xqqs. I
m Just received a Gar of Dry
1 Ltnd Turkey Red Wheat for
M Seed.
H VOGLER SEED GO.
H Salt lake Gity
If there is anything the matter with
your horses or stock use
W. B. Chapman's LINIMENT
For Man or Beast. If it does not
Cure when all fails, don't pay
for it. Get your money back.
AT ALL DRUGGISTS
Wholesale by
V. A. NELDEN DRUG CO.
Salt Lake City.
I WHITE LEGHORORNS
H ' LAYING STRAIN OF COCKERELS f
H Thcsfc birds will probably lay as many eggs, right now, as some V
H i of your hens Whatl Hens don't lay any eggs now? Well, ncith- H
H cr do these cockerels, but their mothers, grand-mothers and great M
H grand-mothers for thirty-fnc generations were selected layers M
H from great egg producers and the egg laying habit is transmitted M '
Hj directly through the male line. If you arc not getting all the m
H V c8gs you wish, try a cross from this laying strain. m
(C. S. GORLINE I
1224 Bait 2 Sooth Street SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH I
THREE CAR LOADS OF RE AUTOMOBILES
H SHIPPED OUR COUNTRY TERRITORY IN MAY
H WHO WILL BE THE NEXT BSS!l Jt
1 TO SHOW WISDOM ALONG KJHBJjj&rf
H THESE LINES, TO SHOW TKJ
I REMEMBER A REO AUTOMOBILE
H CAN BE U5ED FOR A GREAT MANY PURPOSES TO YOUK
H ADVANTAGE.
H WRITE AND ASK US ABOUT THIS.
SHARMAN AUTOMOBILE CO.
H xog-iii W. So. Temple Street. SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
I . The FAMOUS DANIELSEN DISC PLOW
H It plows any width or any depth.
H It it simple, strong, and easy to operate.
B It is the only disc plow under complete control.
OUR MACHINERY IS FULLY GUARANTEED
Danielsen Plow Co.
Bel! Phen 3101
H 210 5. 6th West. St. SALT LAKE CITY
WRITE FOR. CATALOGUE
AGRONOMY I
This Department is Edited by Prof.
J. C. Hogenson, of the Ag
ricultural College.
A number of interesting and com
plimentary letters have been received
with regard to my article on "A
Weed and Pure Seed Law." I -am
very glad that the farmers' arc inter
ested in this work for it is certainly
of vast importance. Now is the time
to agitate the matter so that our
next legislature will be able to act.
A bill should be drafted cither by
some interested person, a member
of the legislature or not, and the far
mers instruct the members of the
legislature from their particular dis
trict to vote for the bill, or else a
circular letter gotten out and sent to
each member of the legislature stat
ing the nature, object and importance
of the bill! becoming law.
Now is the time to act Do it now.
PASTURE GRASSES AGAIN.
Layton, Utah, Oct. is, 1908.
Editor Dcscrct Farmer: I have been
much interested in the mixture of
grasses for cow pasture that you have
published at different times. Now
pleasc state a mixture that would be'
well to plant on low, wet ground! that
is inclined to alkali.
A SUBSCRIBER.
Answer by Prof. J. C. Hogcnson.
With regard to a mixture of grasses
suitable to sow on low, wet ground
that is inclined to alkali, will say that
the first thing to do is to drain the
Jand, if possible, to take away the
excess of water and mincnail salts. As
good a mixture as has been tried for
this kind of land is as follows: 12
pounds red top, 12 pounds meadow
foxtail, 12 poundfe of meadow fescue
per acre.
n -
HOW SIZE OF SEEDS AFFECT
YIELDS.
There has been an enormous' in
croase in he number of grain drills
and fanning milla sold to farmers of
the great central West during the
last few years as compared with simi
lar periods in the past. While we do
not have any statistics at hand, we
give it our opinion that there were
ft
more grain drills sold to farmers in 1
this area last year than have ever 1
been sold in any two years previous-
ly. This being true, we may con-
sider ourselves fairly well established
in the grain drill era, and the mis
take will surely not be made of us
ing our drills to sow light seed.
In order to give our readers a clear
idea concerning the effect of size of
seeds on production, we would like
to give the substance of an address
delivered last summer at a meeting
of agronomists by the director of the '
Ontario Experiment Station, Prof, C.
A. Zavitz. There is no man on the
continent today as well qualified as
Professor Zavitz to speak on this
subject, for the simple reason that he
has been carrying on extensive ex- I
periments on this very line for a de- I
cade and a half. What he says,
therefore, is not the result of a single
experiment or the experiments in a
single year. His figures, to our way
of thinking, arc absolutely conclu
sive. In his experiments Professor Za
vitz divided seed into three iclasscs,
namely, the large, the medium and
the small. The selections were made
with great care by the use of sieves
and by hand picking. He found that
oats grown from the large seed for
an average of seven years yielded
sixty-two bushels per acre, while
medium scel selected from the same
supply of oats during the seven years
averaged fifty-four bushels per acre,
and side by side with this the small
seed, taken from the same supply re
member, yielded forty-six and one
half bushels per acre. The average
result of sawing large, plump barley
seed for six years in succession was
a yield of fifty-three , and one-half
bushels per acre, while in the case of
small, plump seed the yield was fifty
bushels per acre. The difference in
the -ciase of spring wheat was a little
more than three and one-half bushels
per acre in favor of the large seed,
while in the case of winter wheat the
large seed yielded six and one-half
bushels per acre more than the small,
plump seed.
These figures indicate that in every '
instance the largest seed produced the
greatest yield of grain. In his re
port on root crops the results given

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