OCR Interpretation


Deseret farmer. [volume] (Provo, Utah) 1904-1912, November 14, 1908, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010218520/1908-11-14/ed-1/seq-2/

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Br '" . i
I f m0 XKI DBgJI&BT JTARMSR Saturday, November X4t I9o8. 11
H Land Turkey Red Wheat for
H Seed.
B VOGELER SEED CO.
Salt Lake City
If there 13 anything the matter with
your horses or stock use
W. B. Chapman's LINIMENT
For Man or Beast. If it docs not
Cure when all fails, don't pay
for it. Get your money back.
AT ALL DRUGGISTS
Wholesale by
v. a: nelden drug co.
Salt Lake City.
I WHITE LEGHORORNS :
LAYING STRAIN OF COCKERELS
Thesie. birds will probably lay as many eggs, right now, as some '
of your hens What! Hens don't lay any eggs now? Well, ncith- ' ,
er do these cockerels, but their mothers, grand-mothers and great
grand-mothers for thirty-fh c generations were selected layers (
from great egg producers and the egg laying habit is transmitted
directly through the male line. If you are not getting all the ,
eggs you wish, try a cross from this laying strain. .
G. S. GORLINE
1224 Et 7 South Strctt SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH t
I THREE GAR LOADS OF REO AUTOMOBILES I
SHIPPED OUR COUNTRY TERRITORY IN MAY
I WHO WILL BE THE NEXT Bttffi&libg?
I TO SHOW WISDOM ALONG "BHBHflKkfA"
I THESE LINES. TO SHOW 7KKaBnA
I REMEMBER A REO AUTOMOBILE
CAN BE U?ED FOR A GREAT MANY PURPOSES TO YOUR
I ADVANTAGE.
I WRITE AND ASK US ABOUT THIS.
I SHAMMAN AUTOMOBILE GO.
109-111 W. So. Temple Street SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
y
The FAMOUS DAN1ELSEN DISC PLOW
H It plows any "width or any depth.
H It ii simple, strong, and easy to operate.
H It is the only disc plow under complete control.
OUR MACHINERY IS FULLY GUARANTEED
H Danielse i , Plow Co.
B!l Phone 3101
210 S. 6th West. St. SALT LAKE CITY
WR.ITE FOIL CATALOGUE
f horticulture! I
This Department is Edited by Prof.
R. S. Northrop, A. C. U.
Editor Dcseret Farmer: Please
tell us through "The Farmer" how
best to dry prunes on a small scale
so that the skins will be tender.
If one should cut and dry prunes
without the pips would that spoil the
flavor of them?
Yours respectfully,
C C. STEFFENSEN.
Murray, Utah.
Answer by R. S. Northrop.
Making Prunes.
To make a first-class prune it is
very desirable that the fruit be thor
oughly ripe, and if this ripening, :an
be accomplished, in dry, warm weath
er so much the better. There have
been seasons when growers have had
to gather their prunes in the rain.
Under such conditions a first-class
prune cannot be made. "Tndry, warm
weather the time occupied in evapor
ating will be several hours shorter
than in dull damp weather. If we had
a prune as large as the Italian or Sil
ver, and of as good quality and, ap
pearance as these, that would, thor
oughly ripen by the middle or last
of July, we would then be in shape; to
assure a first-class article annuajly.
At present there is no prune which
fills these conditions. Tragedy, a re
cent introduction fromr California,
ripens early enough, but while it is
large and attractive as a green fruit
it does not make a very desirable
prune, ibcing of a. dingy color and
quite acid. Golden prune, originated
hv the late Scth Lewcllintr, of Ore
gon, ripens early enough and makes
a prune fof fair quality, but iAs color
is against it,, it requires to be sul
phured, and like the silver prune is
easily blemished, it is only of medium
size and very soft in flesh . Some
1 cross-breeding of the prunes now on
hand' may result in the variety we arc
looking for. ".
Evaporating Prunes.
The first step in the evaporation of
prunes is to gather the fruit It is.
admitted on all hands that the fruit
ought to bo thoroughly ripe, so ripe
that the greater .portion, of it is- drop
ping; on ready to drop-from: the trees'?
unripe fruit- never makes" satisfactory
prunes; it will be light in weight and
will contain many "frogs." At pick-
ing time the ground under the trees
will usually be soft and dusty so that I
no harm comes to the fruit in drop- I
ping to the ground. The fruit is gath- I
crcd from the ground into bushel Ij
baskets or boxes, loaded onto wag- K
ons, and at once hauled to the dryer,
as evaporators are called, and at once H
put into the grading room. The fruit W
is usually gathered three times; the fjf
first gathering commences when a con- Ij
sidcrablc portion of the fruit has m
dropped, and will usually consist only ft
of fallen fruit, sometimes, however, fcf,
the trees are given a gentle shaking "L
and all that falls goes with the first Ij
gathering. A stccond gathering will th
follow in a few days,' again gently Iff
shaking the trecs. The third and last ill
gathering will 'include all the late, M
small, and immature fruit, some of
whiqh it will be necessary to hand 1 1
pick or knock off with poles. This 4jf
grade ia last to run through the dry- I
er, and had better not be mixed with I
the best fruit. !
After the green fruit is gathered it j
ia passed on to the- dipping tanks. p.
These tanks, two in number, arc con- (
veniently located at the -end of the K
room and -on, a level with or a little.
abovc the. ftqor. The tanks will hold' J,
from forty to fifty gallons, the first I
cpntauiing the lye ba,th, the other the J
clean' water for rinsing the fruit.
These tanks' are-usuajly placed side by J
side, or at least only separated by a j
dripping board on which the basket J
stands for 'half's minute or so after j
leaving the lye bath and before being
rinsed. The lye bath is kept almost
at the boiling point, and is composed
rf two pounds of concentrated lye to
twenty gallons of water, as the water
in the bath i. reduced it is added to
from time to ?imc more water and
more lye. The operator uses his
judgment in the matter, if the bath is
doing good work, i. c,; rutting the (
skin with a minimum amount of im- I
mcrsion, the bath is alnght; if this 1
' not the case, more lye is added. g
From time to time the whole bath is
renewed, as it becomes heavily eharg- ft
cd with paraffin bloom of the fruit A
and with fruit juices. The rinsing m
bath, is ibetter kept hot, but some- M
times it is not so, and the water is S

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