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Deseret farmer. [volume] (Provo, Utah) 1904-1912, November 21, 1908, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010218520/1908-11-21/ed-1/seq-2/

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2 XHJS DESIJRBT TAUMEE SATURDAY, NOVEMBER ax, 1908. i
Just received a Car of Dry BROTHER
Land Turkey Bed Wheat for Accidentally, on camping trip, have
mm j discovered a Root that will euro both
oa tobacco habit and indigestion. No
rr-nT-nn A-n rtfx i (frags, but nature's remedy. Let mc
VOGELEE SEED CO. write you about this wonderful root.
Salt Lake City a. H-STOKES, Mohawk, Fla.
J WHITE LEGHORORNS :
LAYING STRAIN OF COCKERELS '
', Thcsic birds will probably lay as many eggs, right now, as some
1 of your hens Whatl Hens don't lay anyeggs now? Well, ncith
1 , cr do these cockerels, but their mothers, grand-mothers and great
! grand-mothers for thirty-fhe generations were selected layers (
from great egg producers and the egg laying habit is transmitted ;
directly through the male line. If you are not getting all the ,
eggs you wish, try a cross from this laying strain.
j: C. S. GORLINE ;
1 1224 Et.t J2 South Strut SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 1
THREE CAR LOADS OF REO AUTOMOBILES
SHIPPED OUR COUNTRY TERRITORY IN MAY
WHO WILL BE THE NEXT SBfegjjgtef
TO SHOW WISDOM ALONG HHlifeftWfcK.
THESE LINES, TO SHOW SJkISSbV
REMEMBER A REO AUTOMOBILE
CAN BE U?ED FOR A GREAT MANY PURPOSES TO YOUR
ADVANTAGE.
WRITE AND ASK US ABOUT THIS.
SHARNAN AUTOMOBILE 0.
xo-iu W. So. Temple Street SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
Thi FAMOUS DANIELSEM DISC PLOW
It plows any width or any depth.
It is simple, strong, and easy to operate.
I It is the only disc plow under complete control.
OU MACHINERY IS FULLY GUARANTEED
Danielsen Plow Co.
Bll Phne 3101
210 S. 6th Weak St. SALT LAKE CITY
WRITE FOR. CATALOGUE
i . ... m -
fRID FARMING I I
MONDELL ON DRY FARMING.
Wyoming Congressman States Some
Personal Experiences and Ob-
scrvations of Dry Farming
at the Pine Bluffs
Festival.
My first experience as a dry farmer
was obtained as a boy more years ago
than I care to tell on a farm in North
western Iowa. Wc did not have a
patented' name for it at that "time. Wc
simply called it a drouth and as wc
had not learned how to farm for dry
years wc were compelled to live on
what wc nad left over from the year
before and our hopes for the year to
coinc. A few years later wc had the
historic visitation of grasshoppers and
that was the driest farming I have
ever known. I refer to that experi
ence for the reason that during the
five, years that the "hoppers" were
with us more or less, I learned some
things about crops which were quick
maturing and the early seeding and
forcing of crops that was of consider
able value to my later experience, in
Wyoming.
Twenty-one years ago next month I
took up my permanent residence in
Wyoming, in Weston county, about
five miles from whicrc the town of
Newcastle now stands. The need of
grain and vegetables which could not
be secured nearer than fifty miles and
then in uncertain quantities suggested
the advisability of growing them, and
the absence of water for irrigation
compelled the experiment of growing
what we needed with the natural rain
fall and so I became a Wyoming dry
farmer I enty years ago.
Miy dry farming at that time con
tinued foT a numter of years, during
which time I gradually increased the
acreage until I farmed over a thou
sand acres and raised over i twenty
thousand bushels of grain and over
twenty-five hundred bushels of pota
toes, sixteen years ago this season.
Of course we did not call it dry
farming, neither had wc heard of the
"Campbell system" or the biennial
system of the Columbia River Up
lands, still wc did very well on a thin
soil and with about fourteen inches
of -rainfall .by simply doing very good
farming and at the right time.. We
would do even better now under the
same circumstances, for wc have f
learnedmany things from those who V
have been the pioneers and pathfind-
crs in. the sciiencc of dry farming. j
Wc have now up there in Crook and
Weston counties an extensive terri
tory in which farming is carried on
and in which reasonably goo(f crops
have been grown by the majority of
thlo farmers for the past ten or twelve"
years, while those who have farmed
the best have been rewarded with phe
nomenal crops most of the time and
good crops all the time.
The country up there differs con
siderably from your country here. It
is more hilly and broken and there is
a greater variety of soil. Also in the
sections most extensively farmed a
heavier snowfall. Rjcccntly, however,
the settlement is extending into a re- fi
gion of open prairie more like yours. L
All of our dry farmers arc not good jj
dry farmers by an means. In fact fij
some of t hie in arc very poor dry farm- IJ
crs, yet they have in the main (been IJ
quite successful and! those who farm p
the best have been very successful. H
.During all my siervicc in Congress K
I have been on the irrigation commit- w
tec and for a number of years was I?
chairman, so I have taken a lively in- If
tcrcst in all that pertains to irrigation, I"
but at the same time I have realized
that, as not to exceed ten per cent of U
the area of the arid states could be ir- 1
rigatcd, any considerable development g
along agricultural lines must depend Jj
quite largely upon the possibility of In
the growing of crops with scant rain- IP
fall. Therefore I have studied the i
possibilities of such development as
religiously as I have studied irriga
tion in all parts of the western states
1 have visited.
The result of my investigation of
the subject has been a surprise at the
extent to which the growing of crops
with scant rainfall has been carried
on throughout the arid and-' semi-arid
region and the limited knowledge that
one such region has had of what was
being done in all others. In Califor
nia it has been necessary to discour
age rather than encourage dry farm
ing in some regions because irriga
tion was possible and therefore ought
to be practiced. . .
In Eastern Oregon and Washington
the system of crapping the ground

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