OCR Interpretation


Deseret farmer. [volume] (Provo, Utah) 1904-1912, December 12, 1908, Image 12

Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010218520/1908-12-12/ed-1/seq-12/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 12

I i2 THE BESERET FARMER Saturday, December ia. 190& 1
H " ' " ' i .., , . ! i n
I I BUY A FARM 1
I . ; HEALTH And WEALTH f
I AWAIT THE MAN WHO
I SECURES A HOME IN I
I ONE OF THE FERTILE
I ' FRUIT -GROWING AND
I , ! AGRICULTURAL VAL- 1
I LEYS OF UTAH OR J
I 1 COLORADO. I
I The I
Denver & Rio Grande 1
I REACHES THEM ALL. ft
I Green River Valley I
! Grand River Valley f
San Pete & Sevier 1
I Valley I
Price Valley f
; AND MANY OTHERS
I ' WRITE FOR INFORMATION J
I .; I. A.BENTON, G.A.P.D.I
I SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 1
I ; A FARM TELEPHOHE 1
H Will save enough horseflesh W
H ! and time every month to pay m
H its cost for a year, and in M
H emergencies, when time is J"
' the big thing, it may save B
H yur hom-e and your life.
t Thousands of farms in this M
H w country are now equipped A
H with telephones and you C
H ' could not persuade one of m
H these farmers who has prov- M
H ed its value to allow his tel- m
phone to be removexl m
h m It helps to make farm life m
H pleasant and saves money. V
HI I You owe it to yourself to m
m hnve a telephone on YOUR m
H , farm. Call on the nearest V
H ', manager of the Rocky Moun- m
H tain Bell Telephone Corn M
H pany and he will tell you J
H , ' how you oan get it at small X
HI cost, or address the General M
H Contract Agent, Rocky W
I Mountain Bell Telephone m
K Company, Salt Lake City. &
(' Rocky Mountain 8811 i
Telephone Go. 1
!
ilim
kllWv
fGR!GULTURE
VITALITY OF WEED SEEDS IN
MANURE.
It is well known that there is con
siderable risk of introducing new
weeds by the purchase of manure and
hay and other feeding stuffs (see be
low). E. I. Oswald, of the Maryland
Station, undertook to obtain more
definite information on this point, es
pecially as regards diss-emination
through manure, by studying the ef
fect of the fermentation of manure
handled in different ways and of pass
ing through the digestive systems of
animals on the vitality of various
weed seeds, including seeds of about
fifty of the worst weeds found in
Maryland.
In experiments in which the manure
remained (i) for six months in a
barnyard heap, and (2) for a short
while in piles as when shipped in car
load lots from cities, it was found that
in the first case there was no danger
and in the second case little danger
of distributing live weed seeds. In
the experiments in which the weed
speeds were fed to yearling steers and
the manure handled in various ways
it was found that
(1) Where the manure was hauled
directly from the stable as a top
dressing an average of only 12.8' per
cent of the seeds fed to animals ger
minated. (2) Where manure was hauled di
rectly from the etablc upon the land
and plowed under 2.3 per cent of the
seeds fed to animals came up.
(3) Where the droppings remained
on the pasture fields unadulterated as
they fell an average of only 3.1 per
cent of the seeds fed to animals ger
minated. The results indicate that in general
it is safe to assume that the vitality
of weed sccdls is destroyed in wcll
rotted manure, but that many pass un
harmed through the digestive tracts
of animals and may be carried to the
land if the manure is not well rotted
before use.
Weed Seeds in Feeding Stuffs.
Several of the experiment stations
having charge of feeding stuffs in
spection have called attention to the
danger of dissemination of noxious
weeds through the use of feeding
stuffs containing weed seeds. Atten-
HH-HiaHHHaHHaHHHHHHHKxl
tion has especially been called to this
matter by the Maine and Vermont
stations. That the danger from this
source is quite serious is shown by
the fact that it was found on exami
nation at the Maine Station that live
weed seeds were found in consider
able numbers in many different kinds
of feeding stuffs, including bran, mid
dlings, brewers' and distillers' grains,
malt sprouts, mixed feeds, chops,
stock and dairy feeds, molasses feeds,
flax feeds, etc. In some cases as high
as 50 per cent of the feed consisted
of weed seeds. "It is quite certain
that many of these weed seeds would
pass unharmed through the digestive
organs of the animals to which they
were fed and would find1 their way to
the fields of the owner."
In a bulletin of the Vermont Sta
tion J. L. Hills and CI H. Jones, dis
cussing this subject, say:
It is a matter of common knowl
edge that there arc sold yearly hun
dreds of carloads of wheat screenings
(which being interpreted means in
the main weed seeds screened from
wheat prior to the milling process).
Sheep and poultry handle them well,
but the digestive system of neither
horse nor cow is able to destroy
them.
In the examinations made at the
Vermont Station weed seeds were
found to be especially abundant in
certain samples of oat feed, mixed
wheat feed, and molasses feeds. It is
estimated that "the buyer of a ton
of one .brand of these molasses feeds
purchased therein three weed seeds
for every square foot of a hundred
acre farm, 129,000,000 weed! seeds to
a ton, bought and paid for by the
farmer who wonders why he is pes
tered by so many weeds." The Maine
Station also found that certain of the
molasses feeds were flagrant offend
ers in the matter of carrying live
weed seeds.
The Main Station calls attention to
a particularly objectionable kind of
weed seed which is especially likely
to occur in injurious amounts in
wheat feeds and by-products, -viz,
cockle. A feed which contains as
much of this seed as was found) in
some of the samples examined by the
ftDaine Station "is 'objectionable riot
only on account of the crop of plants
which might be grown, but because
of its possible injury to stock." .
It is thus made clear that the ten-
dency to introduce foul seeds into U
the seeds and by-products used as
feeding stuffs is a serious one.
For the most part there is little R
known as to the nutritive qualities of H
these weed seeds; occasionally, nota- I
bly the case with corn cockle, they 8
arc poisonous. They arc a .great I
menace to clean fields. Naturally the B
use of these feeds high in foreign 1;
weed seeds will tend to the introd'uc- I,
u
tion of undue numbers of undesirable !;
plants and sometimes of plants un- j
known to the State. In some of the
i'ceding stuffs in the method of pre-
paration they are heated to a high j
enough temperature to kill the seeds.
The national food and drug law for
bids the presence of poisonous weed
seeds in poultry and cattle foods. Di
rector Woods of the Maine Station 1
is of the opinion that in addition to I
enforcing this prohibition of the 11a- I
tional law regarding poisonous seeds, '
it would be desirable and probably '
practicable for the States to also place )
a. limit to the amount of weed seeds
of any kind that should be allowed
in feeding stuffs. He says:
It would seem: unwise to attempt to
regulate the amount of weed seeds
that arc present in grass seeds and
"'allow an unrestricted! sale of feeding
stuffs carrying in some cases more
dangerous seeds than grass seeds
carry:
o
HOW TO BENEFIT FARM LIFE.
Very likely there will be a good ;
many answers to the question: "How
can farm life be bettered?" That is,
broadly, the question President
Roosevelt has asked, and if the peo
ple of the nation do not give the right
answer, it will be their own fault. 1
Here is a definite and intelligent ef-
fort to ascertain. A' commission of
three uncommonly capable men go
about the country and hold meetings
at which their sole business is to find
what the people farmers especially
have to complain about, what they
have to be glad about, and how their
condition couldl be improved.
Probably Professor Merrill of the
Agricultural College came as near the
right suggestion as any man before
the commission when -he said the
farmers need good roads. Nothing

xml | txt