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Dakota County herald. (Dakota City, Neb.) 1891-1965, July 02, 1909, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries, Lincoln, NE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/2010270500/1909-07-02/ed-1/seq-8/

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"AUUEST THIS MAN.'
KILLED IN "BLACK II AND" PLOT.
CHEVEOIST IS BUICK CAR, WINNER OP TH1 CCXE TJtOrHT.
) 5
Police Description of Chines Wanted for the Killing f Elsie Slgel,
the New York Missionary, and Chum Who Told the Story.
1.00KIKJ. -
Low eu
iaced raw
TOE TOP
uOViK.
LEON
"LAME BOU" r.ASTMAN.
TIOHT FOB THE PENNANTS.
Standing of Clulta la ihm Irlaclpnl
' Bm Ilutl Lcavues.
RATIONAL LEAUt'K.
w.
Pittsburg .43
Chicago ...37
New York. 31
Cincinnati .31
L.
14 rhlladel'a
21 St. Louis
22 Ilrooklyn
29 U.-stou ..
w.
.20
..24
..20
..15
L.
30
34
36
41
AMEBIC AN LILiGUK.
w.
.42
.33
.33
.31
I.
20 New York
25 Chicago ...
25 Wash'gton
28 St. Louis .
w.
.27
.28
.20
.21
L.
Detroit ..
Boston ...
Phlladel'a
Cleveland
30
81
37
39
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION,
W.
Mllw'kee ..37
Mlnn'pulis .37
lnd'p'lls ..38
Louisville .35
w.
..35
.31
..29
..29
I-
32
32
33
34
Columbus
Kan. City
St. Paul .
Toledo ..
3.1
34
32
38
, CALLS TWO CENT FAEE ILLEGAL.
Declare Statute I'neountltotlonal and
Knjulna Aiut enforcement.
The 2-cent fare law passed by the
Pennsylvania legislature In 1907 re
ceived another blow Friday when
Judge Willson In Common Pleas court
la Philadelphia declared the law un
constitutional. The decision was in
the case of the Philadelphia and Head
ing Railway Company to restrain the
county of Philadelphia from enforcing
the law. The local courts rendered a
similar decision about a year ago in a
suit brought by the Pennsylvania Rail
road against the county. Judge Will-
eon holds that the law is contrary to
the constitution of the United States
and the county la perpetually enjoin
ed from enforcing the act against the
Reading company.
Candidate Slain br Machine.
John Moore, superintendent of the
machine shop, of the Carnegie Steel
Company, at Dellalre, Ohio, had his
head amputated and ground to a pulp
in k machine. He was a member of
the city council and a candidate for
mayor.
Killed and llnrt In I'anlo.
Dispatches tell of an explosion and
disastrous fire In a moving picture hall
la Delaguer, Spain,' la which at least
twelve persons perished and fifty wre
1 gteto tom ,
S3 i s
feJ i a-.;..V:.'J
Jjjjoxed.
HE.T6HT.. 5 17. IK T.
4-HIGH CHRZK.
1 25 Touicnrt
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CJOLTJ HL7XT1KJ
HAY HAVE.
HONOtf JWM" OX
it. "w.lx.: "
Or LEFT HAtfD.,
LONE BANDIT GETS BANK CASH.
Daylight, Raid in Fort Worth NeU
$8,100 Plundor.
A lone highway mnn, well dresnod
find appearing like a man of affalra,
robbed the Waggoner Itank and Trust
Company In Forf. Worth, Tex., ot $8,-
100 in currency Tuesday afternoon.
The bank is in the central part of
Fort Worth's business district Th9
robber escaped.
The robbery was the most daring in
Texas in soruo years. Cashier Walter
B. King waa Alone in the bank, bal
ancing the business of the day, when
a well-dreaHcd utranpor walked in. As
the man approached the window of the
cashier's desk King looked into the
muzzle of a revolver. Next came the
demand for the money In eight "Make
fi move or noise of any kind and I'll
kill you." was the greeting King re
members.
The cashier handed over the money,
and, ttuflinj5 tho roll of bills into his
pocket, the man backed out of the door
nnder cover of his pistol. As King
ran to a telephone he saw the robber
walking down tho street and mingling
with the crowds with an air of uncon
cern. , The police reached the scene
five minutes later, but the stranger
had disappeared.
fp Army-
Upon tho threat of the Single Tax
League to hold as formerly a public
meeting in the Philadelphia City Hall
plaza, the Department of Tubllc Safe
ty hastily revised its previous order
against such meetings. The meeting
of the Single Taxera was not Inter
fered with, for fear of having tho or
der construed by the courts.
Prior to his sailing for Europe Fres
ident Gompers gave to the press t
formal Interview or message to the
American public on behalf of organ
ized labor. He said he would carry
with him the Ideal of a world wide
movement on the part of the work
ers to get their rights. The cause for
which he stood, he said, demanded a
reconstruction upon the foundation of
common humanity, common justice
and common liberty of our Institu
tions. The time was past when "Van
Cleave can Intimidate unionism."
They would demand a solid "square
deal," and would get It by force of
organization and by international fra
ternity." "
Gov. Johnscil, of Minnesota, has en
gaged to deliver forty lectures In va
rious Eastern cities at $200 each.
Former Representative Tom Mar
shall, of North Dakota, is expected to
announce his candidacy for P. J. Mc
Cumber'a place la the United States
Senate shortly.
Mall carriers In cities who rode on
street cars at reduced rates, and po
licemen and firemen who rode free
before the pasasge of Minnesota's
Iron-clad anti-pass law, are planning
the defeat ot a number ot State Sen
ators.
$S p0j r
insnsTirs oust tostes.
txpeUcd fror.i CLicio C.inftrene
Account of IlsretlcU View.
Trofsrtor George Herman FoRter oi
Monday was rui'll'-d tro;n fhe ChlCJV
go Hapt!nt Minlitrrn' Contorcnce be
cau of thi alK";"d erMlral beliefs
evprrmcd In hi rn-ent btmk on "Tha
Function of Iicligion." Aftpr a Ion?
and hrntrd dnbate. in which the cler
gyman Indulged In bitter pprsonalltlaa,
the orqaiil'.-atlon at Ita weekly meeting
decided by a vote of 40 tolO to drop
the University of Chicago professor
from Its momtHT.xlilp. The action does
not nff'-ct Prnf(or roster's standing
as a r.aptlst minister, but simply ad
vecates disapproval of him and takes
from hiii' the ri;it of fellowship la
the conference. The resolution finally
passed wns stripped of all unnecessary
verbl.uje, and In puch form was ablu
to command ths support of a number
who disliked the sort of tactics pur
sued by the foes of Professor Foster.
As Introduced by Rev. Johnston My
ers, leader of the antt-Fostor forces,
the original resolution rcitod tho var
ious accusations against Professor Fos
ter and declared lib retention in the
association Injurious to the denomina
tion, it nlo called nuon the trustees
At the University of Chicago to dismiss
Prof-s.-or Foster from the faculty of
the Inst ltd! Ion. With tho consent of
Mr. Myers tho resolution was amended
snd siniIlflcd until Its final form, as
pas.se was as follows: "Resolved,
That the Paptlst Ministers' Conference
of Clilca'TO drop Professor Caorgo Uur
man Foster from its membership."
LONE BANDIT GETS LANK CASH
Daylight Eald in Fort "Worth Nets
$3,100 Plunder.
A lone highwayman, well dressed
and appearing like a man of affairs,
robbed the Waggoner Panic and Trust
Company in Fort Worth, Tex., of S,
100 In currency Tuesday afternoon.
Tho bank l. In the central part of
Fort Worth's business district Tha
robber escaped.
,Tho robbery was the most daring la
Texas In some years. Cashier Walter
K. King was alone in the bank, bal
AncinK tho biiHlnes ot the day, when
a well dressed stranger walked in. A1?
the nan approached the window of the
cashier's desk King looked Into tho
muzlo of a revolver. Next came tho
demand ior the money in sight "Make
a move or noise of any- kind and I'll
kill you," was the greeting Klug re
members. The cashier handed over the mony,
and, Ktufl'mg the roll of bill3 into his
pocket, the man backed out of the door
under cover of his pistol. As King
ran to a telephone he saw the robber
walking down the street and mingling
with tho crowds with an air of uncon
cern. The police reached tho Bcene
five minutes later, but the strant;er
had disappeared.
JURY CONVICTS A. P. IIEINZE.
Brother of Copper King Found
Guilty of Impeding Justice.
Arthur P. Hcdnzo wr.s found grullty
In New York of impeding Justice by
inducing a clork in the employ of F.
Augustus Ilpinze's $SO,000,000 United
Copper Company to evade a subpoena
issued by the United States grand Jury
investigating the actions of F. Augus
tus Ilolnze as president of the Mercan
tile National Dank of Xew York.
The penalty for the offense is $.'00
flna or three months In jail, or both,.
Sentence was suspended until the Oc
tober term of court on tho promise of
the prisoner that he would do all in
his power to produce for the grand
Jury the books of the United Copper
Company which he admitted he had
caused to be removed from the office
of the company ot No. 71 llroadway,
Ho began that task by going before
the grand Jury and telling where he
sent the books and all he knows of
their whereabouts and t'uo mutilation
of them.
FIIvE KILLS 5 MEN, C8 HORSES.
Origin ( ninxo Mynfery mid Ultra
bau:aiieit ifUO.OOO Worth.
In a fire of unknown origin late Sat
urday afternoon five men and sixty-
eight horses were cremated In the
board of trade livery barn in Duluth,
and damage was done to the building
to tho extent of $30,000. The building
was owned by Barrett & Zimmerman,
horse dealers of St. Paul. The fact
that tho men had lost their lives was
not known until after the fire had
been subdued, when firemen In looking
through the ruins discovered their
charred remains near the rear en
trance through which they had tried to
effect their escape.
SES TORNADOES IN KANSAS.
afnnt Ill.mn fruiu Mother Aral
nnd I.oat.
Six destructive tornadoes formed la
Norton county, Kansas, Thursday aft
ernoon, following a sultry day. A
heavy dounpour of rain waa accom
panied by hall, measuring six and
seven Inches In circumference. Tele
phone lines' were blown down. The in
fant child of Frank Gentry was blown
from It.) mnther'ai arms and cannot be
found. Residences were swept away.
Farm hands suffered severe Injuries
Tim'oir was ma.ved like grass. Th
other tcrnadce were equally destru.-tr
Ive, acccidii'.g ta tie nnfaser report
Noted tlrlti.U AriUt Dead.
EdwarJ Joiui Gregory, K. A., presi
dent of the Royal Institute of Paint
er in W.er Colors, dud at Great
Marlow, England. He was bora in
1850.
rialh 1,000,0(10 Undue.
The Toledo and Ohio Central no
the Kanawha and Michigan Railroad
completed their new bridge across th
Ohio Hlver. four miles east of Galli
pot Is, Oh'.o. The cost of the improve
ment if estimated at $1,000,000.
l( ee Helper fclny Farmer.
Iiiuce Moore, a farilTer near Platte
City. Mo., was shot and killed by
George Jehnson, who bus been living
on the Moore farm for several mouth
The murder was doue iu the preseuct
of Moore's wife,
Fourteen-Yoar-Oli I5oy Shot by
Chicago Policeman.
Traprcd Just as the culminating
point in a scheme to extort $1T,000 by
"Black Hand" methods In Chicago, Uu
dolph Perendt. only 14 years old, fled
in an effort to escape the detectives
who were on watch for him and was
land low by a bullet from the revolver
of Detective Philip llelnrclch of the
Sheffield avenue station. He died at
the hospital an hour after he bad been
shot and after making a full confes
sion. In which he Implicated his cous
in, Alfred Haase, a year older than
himself. i
The tragedy which ended the wild
boylxh plot took place at flrand avenue
and Dcsplalnes street rdiortly after 8
o'clock Wednesday night. Just after Ru
dolph haI received from S. K. Cross
feld, whole:-ale"groccr at 1S5 West Ran
dolph street, two packager, supposed
to contain the $13,000 which had been
demanded of hltn.
CiroHsfeld received the first demand
for the money on June 14 In a lettei
In which ho was. informed that unless,
he produced the cash within two days
he and the members of his family
would be murdered, lie was also warn
ed that he would be tortured and
killed If he notitled the police. Tin
letter was followed by Heveral tele
phone cal!s. the last two of them Wed
nesday, when Orossleld was told to
bring the money that night and that
failure to do so would mean death to
him.
The police were infermed and it
was arranged that Grossfeld was to bi
at the appointed place with two "dum
my" packages, apparently ready U
turn over the money. Several detect
ves were detailed to be in the vicin
Ity. Unconscious of the rits1?, youn?:
Bersndt walked up to firossfeid, placed
a -revolver agalm.t his ride and told
him to hurry and handover the money.
Accepting the two packages, he turned
and ran in the direction of Austin av
enue, paying no heed to the shouts of
the officers to halt. ' The second shot
inflicted tiie wound from which he
died.
TUCKERS AGREE TO LI70RCE.
Wifa to Get J?20,000 Property and
Charge Colonel with Desertion.
An agreement in the domestic diffi
culties of Mrs. Mary Klizabeth Logan
Tucker, daughter of the late General
John A. Logan, and Colonel William
F. Tucker, U. S. A., retired delayed,
Is said, because of differences re
garding the amount of money Mrs.
Tucker was to receive in lieu of al!
alimony has been reached, which will
result in the latter applying for di
vorce on the ground of desertion.
When Colonel Tucker learned that
the name of Mrs. Myrtle Piatt had
been dragged into the case, it is un
derstood, he let it become known that
it any further charges were made
against him he would retaliate. Fear
ing that these charges and threatened,
counter charges would result in a bit
ter court struggle and 'notoriety. It ta
said, Mrs. Johu A. Logan brought suf
ficient pressure to bear to bring about
an ' amicable settlement Under the
terms of the agreement, according to
friends of the Tuckers, Mr3. Tucker
wlli receive property valued In excess
of $20,000.
WILLIAM J. BRYAN, JR., WEDS.
Sun of Commoner Mnrrlea JIlsn
llei'uer nt (i-nd Lake, Colo.
William J. Iiryan, Jr., and Miss
Helen Virginia Berger of Milwaukee,
were married at 8:30 o'clock Thurs
day morning at Klnnikinic Lodge, the
summer home of Mr. and Mrs. F. I).
Levering, on the west shore of Grand
Lake, Colo. The wedding was a quiet
affair, and only the immediate families
of the couiile were present. The cere
mony was performed outdoors, under
the great pine trees along the shore
of the lake. Rev. 11. S Huntington of
Crete. Neb., officiating. Miss Edna
Raker of Lincoln, Neb., was maid of
honor, and Samuel Derger, brother of
the bride, was best man. The bridal
party were gowned in white. Mr. and
Mrs. Iiryau, Jr., will spend their hon
eymoon at Grand Lake and will leave
about September 1 for Tucson, Ariz.,
where they expect to make their home
for the next two years.
SIX TORNADOES IN KANSAS.
Infant filown from Mother'
Am
and I.oat.
Six destructive tornadoes formed in
Norton county. Kansas, Thursday aft
ernoon, following a sultry day. A
heavy dounpour of rain was accom
panied by hail, measuring six and
seven Inches in circumference. Tela-
phone Jnes were blown down. The In
fant child of Frank Gentry was blown
from Its mother's arms and cannot be
found. Residences were swept away.
Farm hands suffered Bevere injuries.
Timber was mowed like grass. The
other tornadoes were equally destruct
ive, according to the meager reports.
JOSEPH B. KLEIN IS ACQUITTED.
Jury Take 'Only Twenty Hlunte
to Hearh Verdict.
The Jury in the case of Private Jo
seph B. Klein, who was charged with
tho murder of Earl Nelson, a 16-year-
bld Kankakee boy, last August, while
the First Regiment was en route to the
Springfield riots, brought in a verdict
of "not iruilty" in Paxton. 111. Tho
Jury was out only twenty minutes.
Klein was in charge of an ammuni
tion car, which was entered by the
Nelson boy, and the soldier in ejecting
the lad inflicted injuries which later
caused his death.
MISSING MAN FOUND SLAIN.
Vldov Aeeuaed of Mnrder After
Hod? 1 IHacovered on Farm.
The body of H. J. ieaaoeater, a
farmer near Mankato, Minn., who dis
appeared two montns ago. was found
burled in a potato patch. Frank Smith,
a hired man, according to the authori
ties, has confessed, saying Mrs. Lead
beater killed her husband with an ax,
probably thnt she might wed another.
Mrs. Leadbeater. Mrs. Charles Swandt,
a sister, and Smith are under arrest
!:y:?!"y
tvii ..;v. if .v,.y.WaxZ4i
NINE KILLED IN WRECK.
Two Heavily Laden Cars Crash To
gether with Fatal Results.
Nine men were killed and at least a
dozen men and women injured Satur
day night In a head-on collision be
tween two heavy cars of the South
Shore Electric Railway at Samuel's
Crossing, Ind. The accident occurred
shortly after 9 o'clock. A west-bound
car was coming at high speed down a
long hill', which is formed by the ele
vated structure under which the Lake
Shore railroad tracks pass. The car
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was well filled. At the foot of the hill
It met an east-bound car, also going at
n terrific Need. The cars were buried
lu each other. The motorman of the
west-bound car was killed, while the
niotorpcan of the east-bound car put
on hl brakes and Jumped. The pas
gengws were farmers and residents of
Porter and Michigan City. It was
hoirs before till the bodies could be
extricated. The injured were taken
to farmhouse 8 and ruBhed on special
cars to South Bend and near-by town.
SLAIN MAN'S BODY IN CAR.
Victim of Murder and Bobbery I
Found at Akron, Ohio.
Tha bodv of an unidentified maa
about 40 years old, who doubtless had
been murdered and robbed, was found
In a box car at Akron, Ohio. The
man's skull had been crushed In and
his nocketa cut open and rifled. The
car was received from Hammond, Ind.
A slip of paper, found In a pocket, ad
dressed to "J. M. O'Lear," said: "Take
Fairfield elevated to La Grange car,
get off at Ogden aven ie." The note is
believed to have refer! sd to a Chica
go address.
tihoot nt Barn Kill Man.
To test a twenty-two caliber rifle, a
farm hand fired it at the side of a
barn near Aberdeen, S. D. William
Douglas, aged 30, formerly of Detroit,
who was In the barn, was struck and
died as he staggered into the yard.
llor Admit Kllllakv Four.
Dan Tso Ac, a 17-year-old Navajo In
dian boy, pleaded guilty In the United
States District Court In Salt Lake
City to the charge of murdering bis
aunt, uncle, sister and couslu He was
sentenced to serve ten years In the
federal prison at Leavenworth, Kan.
Noted Irltlh Arll.t Dead.
Edward John Gregory, R. A., presi
dent Ot the Royal Institute ot Paint
ers in tfater Colors, died at Great
Marlow, England. He was born la
.til.
BALLOON FALL KILLS THREE.
nnanlnn (nnnl, Court Chambcrlnlo
and Wife llaohril to Death.
Court Chamberlain Palltzln, his wife
and Count Rostofftseff, director of the
private chancellery of Empress Alex
andra, were killed in a ballon acci
dent at St. Petersburg. ' Tha balloon,
General Wannowski, belonging to the
army department. In which four offi
cers had a similar misfortune a year
ago, ascended from the military bal
loon park In charge f Captain Korbe.
In the basket with him were Court
Chamberlain Palltzln and his wife and
Count Rostofftseff. The balloon drift
ed across the city at an altitude of a
little less than a mile, and when It
"vas Just above the outskirts Count
Rostofftseff, by mistake, pulled the rip
cord. As the gas escaped from the en
velope the balloon descended rapidly
to the ground, and the car fell in the
garden of a country house. Captain
Korbe escaped with a broken leg.
BODY FOUND IN TRUNK.
Yletlm, Bolleved to Be Elsie Slgel,
Granddaughter ot General Sigel.
The body cf a young and pretty
woman, strangled death and then
wedged Into a small iteamer trunk,
was found by the police on the top
floor of a four-story brick building at
782 8th avenue, New York.
Two Chinamen who disappeared sud
denly about the time the woman came
to her death are being sought by the
police, who are also endeavoring to
ferret out the significance attending
the mystery In the disappearance of
Elsie Slgel, of 209 Wadsworth avenue,
a granddaughter of the late General
Franz Slgel, of Civil War fame, who
has been missing from New York for
a fortnight.
Around the dead girl's neck was
found a gold plated clasp pin bearing
the letters "E. C. S." The father of
Miss Slgel, who Is an Inspector in '.he
health department, could not identify
the trinket as that of his girl. Her
mother Identified It later.
BOY IN BLUE BACK AGAIN.
Arm Do Away with Brow Caaea
Fatlcae Vairorm.
The War Department In Washington
intends to save 1192,800 in the next
three years and a proportionate sum
yearly thereafter by changing the cloth
of the fatigue uniform or working
clothes of the enllcted men of the
United States army from brown can
vas to blue denim. The latter mate
rial has been found in every way as
satisfactory as the former and the cost
,ls about one-fourth le
MINISTERS OUST FOSTER.
Expelled from Chicago Conference en
Account of Heretical Views.
Professor George Uurman Foster on
Monday was expelled from the Chica
go Baptist Ministers' Conference be
cause of the 'alleged heretical beliefs
expressed In his recent book on "The
Function of Religion." After a long
and heated debate, In which the cler
gyman indulged in bitter personalities.
tho organization at its weekly meeting
decided by a vote of 40 to 10 to drop
the University of Chicago professor
from Its membership. Tho action does
not affect Professor Foster's standing
as a Baptist minister, but simply ad
vocates disapproval of him and takes
from him the right of fellowship In
the conference. The resolution finally
passed was strfpped ot all unnecessary
verblaee, and in such form was able
to command the support of a number
who disliked the sort of tactics pur
sued by the foes of Professor Foster.
As Introduced by Rev. Johnston My
ers, leader of tho anti-Foster forces,
the original resolution recited the var
ious accusations against Professor Fos
ter and declared his retention in the
association injurious to the denomina
tion. It also called upon the trustees
of the University of Chicago to dismiss
Professor Foster from the faculty of
the Institution, With the consent of
Mr. Myers the resolution was amended
and simplified until its final form, as
passed, was as follows: "Resolved,
That the Baptist Ministers' Conference
of Chicago drop Professor George Bur-
man Foster from its membership."
LOSE BANDIT GETS BANK CASH.
Daylight Raid In Fort Worth Nets
$8,100 Plunder.
A lone highwayman, well dressed
and appearing like a man of affairs,
robbed the Waggoner Bank and Trust
Company In Fort Worth, Tex., of ,-
100 in currency Tuesday afternoon.
The bank is In the central part of
Fort Worth's business district The
robber escaped.
The robbery was the most daring in
Texas in some year3. Cashier Walter
E. King was alone In tho bank, bal
ancing the business of the day, when
a well-dressed stranger walked in. A3
the man approached the window of the
cashier's desk King looked Into the
fhu;:z!e of a r-evolver. Next enme the
demand for the money la sight. "Make
a move or noise of any kind and I'll
kill you," was the greeting King re
members. The cashier handed over the money,
and, stuffing the roll of bill3 Into his
pocket, the man backed out of the door
under cover of his pistol. As King
ran to a telephone he saw the robber
walking down the street and mingling
with the crowds with an air of uncon
cern. The police reached the scene
five minutes later, but the stranger
had disappeared.
FIGHT FOR THE PENNANTS.
Standing of Club In the Principal
Bane Bull Leag-nea.
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
W. L-
Plttsburg .39 13 Ph'd'lphia
Cliicago ...33 .,19 St. Louis .
New York .26 22 Brooklyn .
Cincinnati .29 26 Boston ...
w.
.21
.23
.19
.13
L.
27
31
33
37
AUENIOAN LEAGUE.
c
27
23
33
35
De'.rolt. ...37 19 New York .25
Phd'lphia .30 23 Chicago ....24
Borton ....31 24 Wash'gton .19
Cleeland .29 25 St. Louis ..19
AUEBICAIt ASSOCIATION.
L. W
25 Lou.svllle .33
31 Kan. City .23
31 Toledo ....28
31 St Paul ...25
u
31
32
34
31
Mllw'kee ..35
Colu-abus .34
Ind'n'polls .34
Mlnn'polis 33
EIQHT-HOUB. LAW UPHELD.
Jnda" Uole Itnlea Oklahoma Lave
Ik Conn! Itntlonul.
The eight-hour law passed by the
first Oklahoma L;g!nlature was held
constitutional by Judge Thomas Doyle
of the State Criminal Court of Ap
peals, thus sustaining Judge J. C.
Strang of the Cointy Court at Guth
rie and overruling a recent opinion by
Attorney General West that the law
was unconstitutional.
Man ldeatifled Slayer.
Joe Totaro, the 14 year-old New
York boy who brought to light the
murder of Samuel Bersin, identified
Slgmund Goldberg, a painter, as the
man who had employed him to watch
the two bundles which later were
found to contain the headless and dis
membered body of Bersin.
Heat Kill Twelve la 'ew York.
The hot wave which inflicted torture
on the east Bide of New York Tuesday
was blamed for at least twelve deaths
and inore than a score of procurations.

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