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Lincoln County tribune. (North Platte, Neb.) 1885-1890, March 24, 1888, Image 1

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THE TRIBUNE.
STEVENS & BARE, Prop's.
TERMS:
One Year, in Advance, - -Six
"Months, in Advance, -Three
Months, in Advance,
-. $1.50
-.' .75
.50.
Advertising Rates on Application.
NESBITT & GRIMES,
Attomeys-at-Iiaw,
NORTE PLATTE, - NEBB-
Office otek Foley's Stoke.
C. M. DUNCAN, M. D.
Physician and Surgeon.
Office: Ottenstein Block, up stain. 'Office
uuiBirara io iz a. ra., a to 5 and 7 to S p. m
Kesidence on West Sixth Street.
NORTH PLATTE,
NEBRASKA
Me
m i
leacne
iIS.
Notice whereby given that I trill examine all
persons who mnjv desire to oftrflttBiselvra. m
candidates for teachers of the comrSSa schools of
this county on the THIRD TUESDAY of every
muuui,
R. H. LANCFORD,
County Sopt.
. R. E. HOLBROOK,
Surgeon XJeaxtlst.
OFFICE POST OFFICE BLOCK,
H. D. Rhea.
Real Estate and Exchange,
Room 12, Land Office Block.
General Law and Land Office Business
Transacted.
City and Farm Property for Sale.
Fire and Tornado Insurance Written.
3Ioney to Loan on Improved City and
Farm Property at Low Rates of Interest.
Prof. N.Klein
Music Teacher.
Ins traction on the Piano, Organ, Violin or any
Reed or Brass Instrument.
Pianos carefully tuned. Organs repaired.
NORTH PLATTE, - - NEBRASKA.
H. MacLEAN,
Fine Boot and Shoe Maker,
And Dealer In
MEN'S LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S
BOOTS AND SHOES. :
Perfect Fit, Best Work and Goods as
Represented or Money Refunded.
REPAIRING PROMPTLY DONE.
Spruce Street, bet. Front and Sixth,
NORTH PLATTE, NEBRASKA.
I. T. CLARESON,
1 74 Randolph St.,
All communications to me, with
regard to my interest in lands in
Cheyenne and other counties in
Nebraska, and as to lots in Schuy
ler, Alda, Paxton, Julesburg, Sid
ney, Potter and Kimball, addressed
as above, will receive prompt and
careful attention.
J. T. CLARKSON.
Bismark Saloon
Billiard and Pool Hall,
J. C. HUPFER, Prop..
Keeps none but the finest Whiskies.such as
ROBINSON COUNTY, TENN.
GOON HOLLOW,
M. V. MONARCH,
0. F. C. TAYLOR.
GTJCKENHEIMER BYE.
WELSH AND HOMESTEAD
Also fine case goods, Brandies,. Rum, Gin
Etc. St. Louis Bottled Beer and
Milwaukee Beer on draft.
Corner Sixth and Spruce Streets,
NORTH PLATTE. - - NEBRASKA
DEEP
Sea Wonders exist in thousands of forms
but are surpassed by the marvels of in
rention. Those who are in need of pro f--ui
that, nan h done while ur
ine at home should at once send their addressto
nfllett &Co., Portland. Maine, and receive free,
finfoonhow eher seofaUages.n
earn 5 to 25 a day and upwards wherever tner
Ur Yonixe started free.. Cap tal not required.
sJSe have made over $50 in a fiingle day at this
work. All succeed.
, . -Wi.i. -
NORTH PLAltKBItASKA, MAECH 21 .888.
YOL. IV.
NO. 10.
U. P. TIME TABLE;
GOING WEST MOUNTAIN TIME.
No. 1 Mail nnrl Vxnifaa T)pnt..8:15 A. 51.
No. S-Overland Flyer " 9. P. M.
No. 27-Freight.V."... V..'. "'.."... " 6:40 p. M
'oiops oniy at ugauaia, jmesDurg ana cianey on
xmra uistrict.
GOING E.ST.
No. 4 Overland Flyer Dept. 5:45 a. si.
fNo. 8 Local-Express " 7.-00 a. m.
No. 2 Mail and Express " 750 r. M.
Stops only at Plum Creek, Kearney and Grand
Island, on Second District.
fDaily except Sunday.
J. 0. Febguson. Agent.
ELECTION NOTICE.
I, G. B. Hammond, Mayor of the City of North
Platte, Nebraska, by virtue of the power in me
vested, do hereby direct that on Tuesday, the Sd
day of April, 1888, ' a city election for the City of
North Platte be held for the election of the fol
lowing officers:
One Mayor,
One Clerk,
OneTreasurer,
One City Entdneer. eL -Jw-
yOse Police JhoW . IDpWS
use vjuncuniiui,-j?ir3i uuni,
One Councilman, "Second Ward,
Two Cooncilmen, Third Ward,
Two Members of Board of Education, for Dis
trict No. L for three years.
That the polls for said election oeop(oiac
o clocK a. m. ana remain open unui i o ciocit p.
m. of said day.
Given under; my nana tins sa aay ot juarcn,
1888.
G. R. Hammond, Mayor.
E. B. Wabneb, City Clerk.
NOTICE.
In the District Court of Lincoln County, Ne
braska.
Mart R. Mason, )
Geobge Mason. )
- To Goonre Mason, non-resident
defendant:
You are hereby notified that on the 2d day
of March, 18SS, Mary R. Mason filed a petition
against you in the District Court of Lincoln
Cnnntxr Nohmclrn tho nhio'p.f: nnrl TimVW of
which is to obtain a divorce from you on the
ground or habitual orunKenncss ana upon me
t rr- r n rl ittof n nra nf cnrKninnh nllill t.V t"l ffim-
ish suitable maintenance for plaintiftTfctl that
you have grossly, wantonly and cruelly refused
and neglected so to do.
Yon are required to answer said petition on or
before Monday, tho fltli day of April. 1888.
JUABI 11. MASON.
Plaintiff.
By Nesbitt & Grimes.
her Attorneys.
J. E. SOMERS,
Nurseryman,
Florist and Gardener,
(BARTON PLACE,)
NORTH PLATTE, NEBR.
Can furnish all kinds of fruit; and
shade trees, forest trees,1 and seed
lings for tree claims at lowest
prices. Also all kinds of plauts and
flowers. Estimates and designs
given for laying; out.newgrQunds.
i ards kept by contract.
PURE ICE!
jrhave just finished putting up
Three- Thousand Tons of Ice
from my -well water lake and
during" the coming summer
will he prepared to furnish all
'witir ice far superior to any
ever offered in this citj
WM. EDIS.
P. WALSH,
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER.
Estimates bn "Work Furnished.
Shop Corner Cottonwood and Third Sts
east or uamouc cnurcn.
USE
BEST SIX COBD
FOR
MACHINE OR HAND USE.
For sale by
T. J. FOLEY.
"GUY'S PLACE:,
FIRST-CLASS
Sample :-: Room,
N L. HALL, Manager,
Having refitted our rooms
throughout, the public is invited to
call and see us.
ONLY
Choice Wines,
Liquors and
Cigars
Kept at the I3ar.
Keith's Block, Front Street,
NORTH PLATTE, - NEBRASKA.
jrfi'' Win'' "inwiiW
HP
vs.
Mr. Simon, Manager of the Palace Cloth
ing Company, is now in Chicago selecting
his Spring Stock, Watch and Wait.
. --if .V : '.V-'r-
-t
i t' '"r
. J V.;-"' ,. ' v
;. - .
Succeeding CASH & IDDINGS.
LUMBERS COAL.
LUMBEE,
Lath.,
SASH,
BLINDS,
DOORS, Etc.
LIMB AND CEMENT.
SPECIAL AGENT FOK
Pennsylvania Anthracite,
Colorado Anthracite
AND
Colorado Soft'
YARD ON R. R. TRACK WEST OF DEPOT,
NORTH PLATTE, NEB.
CHAS. W. PRICE
DEALER IK
J7mgs 8- )rciggi5t Scmdries
Pore Drugs and Chemicals,
PERFUMES, ETC., ALL FRESH AND NEW
Cigars, Tobacco and Smokers' Articles.
Prescriptions carefully compounded. Headquarters for Dr. Duncan.
Foley's block, speuoiriei,
MORTH PLATTE, . - - NEBRASKA.
$1,200,000.
Twelve Hundred Thousand Dollars
From all Sources for Missions
in,1888.
Poiter, Neb., March, 16th, 1888.
During the last fifty years the grand'
question which has absorbed the best
minds and hearts in the Church of God is
How to bear the message of life to the
whole human rare as soon as practicable?
Home Missions and Foreign Missions are
but two gigantic arms of our still more
gigantic work a world's evangelization.
Because the movement is of God it cannot
be stopped. The waves will be swept
back, and the tide is fast rising. The
very roar of the serf is God's voice of
thunder calling his people to leave no
human soul to live and die without the
v..
v 'J --: t
st NebskarCthference. Part
of my' duty- is to hare published in the
various newspapers in my district, articles
on the subject of Christain Mission and
give the reading public information on
general missionary work, and tseeTi to
arousb an interest in'the grand work' of
saving our race. The missionary enter-'
prise is the most enabling and beneficient
work that ever engaged the thought or as
pirations of man. 'Consequently it de
mands attention and investigation where
ever the missionary has gone and his
message is received and the gospel of
Jesus embraced. Statements have become
more generous and just, merchants more
honest, masters more human, servants
more faithful, husbands more affectionate,
wives more tender aud chaste, and chil
dren more filial the drunkard, sober; the
sting', liberal ; the suspicious, confiding;
the stoical, social; the sad, joyous; the
desponding, hopeful; the passionate,
patient; the thief, honest ;the hard hearted,
tender; the blasphemer, a person of clean,
lips; the unclean, clean; the miserable
happy; and the sinner a saint.
The family has been blessed where
prayer was never offered, "praises to God
never sang, love was a stranger and God
forgotten. Now prayer is heard, the
praises'to God are sung, peace prevails at
the demestic hearth, and love binds the
household.
"Old things have passed away, and all
things have become new." " Nations have
also felt the benign influence of the gospel
of Jesus, and rejoiced in its transforming
power. ,
: Wherevor-the'Bible-is most-read audits.
precepts followed there we find constitu
tional government, there are free" schools
and means for educating the masses, there
are progressive science, improved inechan
icism, steam power, telegraphs, tele
phones, farming machinery, railroads,
there are systematic reliefs for the medi
cant, the blind, the deaf and 'dumb, the
insane and every charitablft religion. And
these can be found nowhere else.
"Woman elevated to her legitimate,
sphere, and motherhood respected and
cherished; society dwells securely, each,
"Sitting under his own vine and figtree,"
and all because the spirit and genius of
the gospel of Jesus has effected his poten
tial and transforming influence.
Hence tol)e associated with Christian
missions, is to be associated with a system
whose influences always and forever
designs the highest culture, and happi
ness of the human family
The Methodist Episcopal church last
year contributed to the cause of mission
by collection only. 1,000,000. This year
we hope to raise by the same method the
sum of $1,200,000.
This is fast becoming a missionary ae,
"more doors of access are constantly being
opened, more missionary organizations
formed, more laborers sent forth, more
new translations of the Bible made and
more copies scattered, more converts to
Christianity, and more evangelizing
agencies set in motion ." Thank God !
"Tho day is breaking.
Wo are living, wo aro dwelling
In a grand and nwfal time!
In an age on ages telling;
To be living is sublime.
Hark! tho waking up of. nations
Gog and Magog to the fray!
Hark! What soandoth! Tis creations's
Groaning for the latter day."
Yes, the time is hastening. God is
rolling on the ages with awful sweep and
force. He is crowding a whole century of
opportunities into a day. He is bringing
the world together, so that the Church
may compass, know it, traverse it, a
hundred-fold quicker and better than in
former generations. Competent engi
neering authorities assure us that in five
years wo shall be able to go around the
world in forty duj-s, and go in co mfort
and with all the security of our modern
civilization ! And are not such facts the
voice of God speaking out of the cloud to
His people to go forward? Missionary
Revieic.
The visit of Livingston to England in
1856, after his memorable walk from
Lorado to Quillemane, from the shores of
the Atlantic to those of the Indian Ocean,
gave a fresh impetus to the cause of
Foreign Missions in this country. The
great object he aimed to enforce upon the
public mind was the elevation of the
natives of Africa; to him "the end of the
geographical feat was the beginning of
the missionary enterprise." The London
Missionary Society redoubled their gener
ous exertions, resolved to extend their
labors by establishing Missions among the
Matabele and the Makololo. Robert
Moffat.
T. H. Dry,
Missionary Sec'y, Sidney District.
MISCELLANEOUS.
Adam Forepaugh will erect a brick and
iron circus pavilion in Philadelphia. He
will use it two months in the year.
Mme. Minnie Hauk has recovered from
the effects of the serious accident which
befell her recently at Geneva and-has re
sumed work on the stage.
Senator Palmer, of Michigan, has the
reputation of being the finest linguist in
the upper house of congress. He can
make a speech in English, French or
Spanish.
President Cleveland reads French
readily. Garfield was the only Presi
dent who ever made a speech in a foreign
language. He could make a fluent ora
ation in German.
. Jay Gould, paid;a00.Q00 Jor.hls country!
A. D, Btjckworth, ' Jab.
President.
CmUmt.
State Bank of North Platte
it
NORTH PLATTE, NH.
331asoA33.t G-ood. 2Tots,
Accounts solicited and proapt atlestips. ktm. .
to all business entrusted to its, cue. Iaternt. ,
paid on time deposits.
Hade at the Very Lowest Bates of Ltterest.
of the defendant, and the costs were taxed
up to Strobridge. County Attorney
Warrington prosecuted and Sinclair ud
Griffin appeared for the defense. At the
trial young Norris did not' teem to know
much about the theft, but on the other
hand he stated on the witness stand that
Strobridge had offered him twenty-five
dollars to say that he saw Bridges take
thfc money. With this assertion from the
main witness for the prosecution the
county attorney promptly dropped the
case. There is evidently a verv disreou
table "nigger in the woodpile" somewhere
and it .is to be .hoped time will locate him
where justice will have a chance to do a
good job for the country Gothenburg
Independent.
J ' mi Vet . j j tji'fv i-
"i&c fcee.rlv Sl50.000 a vear.
embraces almost a square mile of land,
ninety-gve acres of which is lawn.
AnAmericancan.be an American and
a state's right man, an American and a
republican, an American and a democrat;
but derned if he can.be an American and
a freetrader, says the San Antonia Express,
(dem.)
There are two hundred private railroad
car3 in the United States, representing a
value of nearly 5.000,000. They are
worth anywhere from $1000 to 60,000
each, the most luxurious probably being
that owned by George M. Pullman.
A New "York school boy is considered
fortunate in having .won $15,009 from a
street railway company for the loss of an
arm. A good arm on a healthy body will
reach farther than that amount of money,
large as it appears to be.
Two Chinese applied for naturalization
and were granted their first papers in the
criminal court yesterday, March 12. This
was wrong. The naturalization of Chin
ese is contrary to the plain language of
the statute, and it has also been held to be
illegal by a Federal Judge.
The Minnesota man who organized the
Mankota Gas Company should go east and
seek a larger sphere where trusts are ap
preciated. It is thought that the assets
of the company will .reach 20,000; its
capital stock was 80,000, and its bonded
and floating indebtedness aggregated 55,
000. One of the wrinkles among fashionable
women the coming summer will be to car
ry telescopes. Many strong --telescopei
made so they can be carried ina small
compass, Tfave beea purchasedoiie; used
at seaside resorts and in traveling. It has
been in vogue abroad for somo time, but
is just being introduced here.
The check which university education
has recently received in Russia may be
judged from the diminuation in the num
ber of students at the St. Petersburg Uni
versity. Whereas there were on Jan. 1st
1886, 2.88'), and on the same day in 1887,
2,627 students, on Jan 1st, 1888, there was
no more that 2,053 names enrolled on the
lists of the colleges.
Typhoid fever in 1887 killed, from two
to four times more people in the country
districts in New York state than in the
cities in proportion to the death rate of
each. The ratio of cases and a typhoid
fever from which a patient gets well often
entails consequences from which the vic
tim never recoverswould be still greater
if there was a record'of them. The Mas
sachusetts returns give the same exper
ience, and if we had any vital statistics in
tbis state worth anything, the' would
show that this deadly disease dops its
worst and most frequent work on farms.
A Frisky Wolf.
When a Nebraska engineer has a story
to tell it is a big one. One of them is
just now asserting that a large gray wolf
jum"ped on the track ahead of his engine
and kept up a gait of forty-five miles an
hour for twenty-two. Then having fur
nished the engineer something to lie
about his wolfbhip jumped into a thicket.
Railway News.
He Beats the Devil.
"Cyclone Bill," known to his family as
William Clawson is a Union Pacific engi
neer, and a dandy too. Last Sunday he
left Grand Island with engine No. 806
pulling the overland flyer fifty minutes
late; this train made all the regular stops,
was delayed twenty minutes, and notwith
standing that the time card of No. 4 is the
fastest on the card, he pulled into Council
Bluffs five minutes ahead of time, having
made up in running 152 miles, one hour
and twenty minutes, with a train of nine
coaches. It was the best run ever made
on the Union Pacific and the News-Reporter
congratulates the able man who made
it. News-Reporter.
The Troubles of a Gaslin Man.
One day last week, Alex Strobridge. of
Gaslin, came to town, filled up with
whisky and became maudlin drunk, in
fact he got very tired and sleepy, and was
placed in a back room in O'Brien's saloon
to rest and sleep off the effects of the in
toxicants. During his stay in the rooms,
referred to he claims he was robbed of
fifteen dollars in cash. Will Norris a
young man who has been around town for
several weeks with a rr.ee horse informed
Strobridge that he saw A. K. Bridges, the
manager of the saloon, take the money
from his (Strobridge's) pocket. Strobridge
let the matter rest a few days then came
to town and had Bridges arrested on the
strength of Norris's assertion The case
was brought before Justice Gentry of
Willow Island, and a hearing had on
Monday last, resulting in the acquittal
Tha Simon-Danil8 Wedding, Al
o'clock last night all was merry2 as"
a marriage in the West Chicago Club. A '
companj of a hundred occupied the wed
ding ball, which was bright with scores of
gaslights aud fragrant with the perfume
oi carnation, camelia, calla and rosebuds
with which the bridal arbor was entwined.
There were young men ia light gloves
and glossy black coats smiling above low
necked waistcoats and spotless ties ; there
were tiny, careless men in knee-breeche
and cut-aways who walked hand in hand
with fathers or grandfathers, who wore
their years as jauntily as their clothes ; .
there were matrons and young mothers in
lustrous satin and trailing brocades, and,
oh, such beautiful young ladies with
bright eyes, rosy cheeks, and matchless
arms and shoulders, some white as marble,
others glowing with the brown and pink
of health, and every one round, smooth,
dimpled, and pretty excuse enough for
being en decollette. The beauty of these
young ladies was further enhanced by the
flash and glitter of jewel and ornament,
the color and perfume of flowers, and the
.fluttering motion of feather and fan. At
the, hour appointed for the nuptials,
the Rev Dr. Stolz, of Zion Congregation,
entered the hall with the goblet of wine,
typcal of the cup of life, resting on a
6mall salver. Before he reached the
bower at the end of the room the nuptial
chorus rang along the vaulted roof and
out through the corridors and open parlors.
Then came the bridal party, including the
ushers, Messrs. Edward Pied, Isaac Frank,
Lee BTahn, and S. M. Baum; the-bride,
Miss Bertha Daniels, the groom, Mr.
Louis F. Simon, and parents, brothers and
rstets of botb;'--witirthe mastorof cere-
monies, Mr. Daniel Simon,-Tri the lead.
The'happy; groom -aOdiis majeetic and
beautiful bride stood in thecenter of the
arch, from which bung a large'floral bell,
and about which a pair of white doves
seemed to hover. During the ceremony
the relatives formed a half circle about
the bridal party, and beyond them the
guests arranged themselves and remained
standing through the address, marriage
and benediction.
When both had plighted their vow, ex
changed rings, and drank from the cup of
life they were pronounced man and wife,
and in accordance with the Jewish custom
retired to the nuptial chamber to receive
the greetings and congratulations of the
families in private, the orchestra playing
Mendelssohn's "Wedding March" as they
left the hall. 'After an absence of fifteen
minutes the bridal party returned to their
former position under the swaying bell,
and received as they passed the proces
sion of friends. At 7 o'cloctc supper was
announced, and after the feast came the
dance, and it was morning when the last
good night was said. Mr. Simon is estab
ished in business in North Platte, Neb.,
where he will make his home. Quanti
ties of beautiful gifts were received by
the young people, including several
checks, household goods, and silverware,
one complete set of sterling coming from
Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Franklin, of Dead
wood, D. T., and another from the
business friends of the groom in North
Platte.
A Narrow Escape.
A "quilting bee" given byMrs.Ruhe
at her home near Wallace, was brought to
a sudden termination with what might
have been a serious accident Wednesday
afternoon. Seven of the ladies had eaten
dinner ancLxesumed their quilting. The
remainder of the guests and the family
were taking their turn at the viands when
Charley Ruhe came in from a hunting
trip. Some one told him to hurry up if
he wanted any dinner, and of course he
hurried. Just about that time the gun
he was setting down exploded, the shot
passing through the door and scattering
among the women. Owing to its force
being broken by the door, no serious in
juries were inflicted, although all the
ladies in the room were struck by glanc
ing shot Wallace Herald.
Fon. Rent. A Dwelling House. In
quire of Mrs. Babb.
ALL COMMUNICATIONS
ME WITH REGARD TO
:Y INTERESTS I MAY HAVE
N TOWN LOTS OR OUT--YING
LAND IN NEBRASKA,
COLORADO OR WYOMING,
WILL RECEIVE PROMPT
ATTENTION.
J. T. CLARKSON,
164 RANDOLPH STREETS-CHICAGO.

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